UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
x      Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
for the quarterly period ended January 31, 2016
OR
o Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
for the transition period from      to
Commission file number: 000-23255
COPART, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
 
94-2867490
 
 
(State or other jurisdiction
 
(IRS Employer
 
 
of incorporation)
 
Identification No.)
 
14185 Dallas Parkway, Suite 300, Dallas, Texas 75254
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
(972) 391-5000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
N/A
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES x NO o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). YES x NO o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
x
 
Accelerated filer
¨
Non-accelerated filer
¨
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company
¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). YES ¨ NO x
As of February 24, 2016 , 112,000,958 shares of the registrant’s common stock were outstanding.



Copart, Inc.
Index to the Quarterly Report
January 31, 2016
Table of Contents
 
Page Number
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





Copart, Inc.
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(In thousands, except share amounts)
 
January 31,
2016
 
July 31,
2015
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
141,416

 
$
456,012

Marketable securities
 
17,465

 

Accounts receivable, net
 
281,227

 
215,696

Vehicle pooling costs
 
29,694

 
24,949

Inventories
 
9,458

 
8,613

Income taxes receivable
 
7,734

 
6,092

Deferred income taxes
 
685

 
3,396

Prepaid expenses and other assets
 
19,179

 
19,824

Total current assets
 
506,858

 
734,582

Property and equipment, net
 
744,224

 
700,402

Intangibles, net
 
14,408

 
17,857

Goodwill
 
264,128

 
271,850

Deferred income taxes
 
31,432

 
28,840

Other assets
 
43,314

 
46,421

Total assets
 
$
1,604,364

 
$
1,799,952

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
 
147,839

 
147,452

Deferred revenue
 
5,478

 
3,724

Income taxes payable
 
12,629

 
8,279

Current portion of long-term debt, revolving loan facility, and capital lease obligations
 
99,171

 
53,671

Total current liabilities
 
265,117

 
213,126

Deferred income taxes
 
4,868

 
5,322

Income taxes payable
 
23,696

 
21,157

Long-term debt and capital lease obligations, net of discount
 
576,501

 
592,135

Other liabilities
 
2,782

 
3,748

Total liabilities
 
872,964

 
835,488

Commitments and contingencies
 

 

Stockholders' equity:
 
 
 
 
Preferred stock: $0.0001 par value - 5,000,000 shares authorized; none issued
 

 

Common stock: $0.0001 par value - 400,000,000 shares authorized; 111,999,458 and 120,156,340 shares issued and outstanding, respectively.
 
11

 
12

Additional paid-in capital
 
394,002

 
407,808

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
 
(103,071
)
 
(68,793
)
Retained earnings
 
440,458

 
625,437

Total stockholders' equity
 
731,400

 
964,464

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity
 
$
1,604,364

 
$
1,799,952


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

3


Copart, Inc.
Consolidated Statements of Income
(Unaudited)
 
 
Three Months Ended January 31,
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
 
2016
 
2015
 
2016
 
2015
Service revenues and vehicle sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service revenues
 
$
260,417

 
$
238,508

 
$
511,384

 
$
485,128

Vehicle sales
 
39,289

 
37,750

 
77,160

 
81,516

Total service revenues and vehicle sales
 
299,706

 
276,258

 
588,544

 
566,644

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yard operations
 
140,965

 
129,273

 
276,874

 
260,278

Cost of vehicle sales
 
34,127

 
32,118

 
66,195

 
69,191

General and administrative
 
32,529

 
34,399

 
67,144

 
74,306

Total operating expenses
 
207,621

 
195,790

 
410,213

 
403,775

Operating income
 
92,085

 
80,468

 
178,331

 
162,869

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other (expense) income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense
 
(5,570
)
 
(4,688
)
 
(11,294
)
 
(6,598
)
Interest income
 
602

 
183

 
813

 
322

Other income, net
 
4,435

 
4,141

 
5,462

 
5,734

Total other expenses
 
(533
)
 
(364
)
 
(5,019
)
 
(542
)
Income before income taxes
 
91,552

 
80,104

 
173,312

 
162,327

Income taxes
 
32,589

 
27,911

 
61,936

 
57,519

Net income
 
$
58,963

 
$
52,193

 
$
111,376

 
$
104,808

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic net income per common share
 
$
0.50

 
$
0.41

 
$
0.94

 
$
0.83

Weighted average common shares outstanding
 
117,306

 
126,300

 
118,731

 
126,258

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted net income per common share
 
$
0.48

 
$
0.40

 
$
0.90

 
$
0.80

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding
 
122,908

 
131,872

 
124,240

 
131,694

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

4


Copart, Inc.
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
 
 
Three Months Ended January 31,
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
 
2016
 
2015
 
2016
 
2015
Comprehensive income, net of tax:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
58,963

 
$
52,193

 
$
111,376

 
$
104,808

Other comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gain on interest rate swaps, net (a)
 
163

 
545

 
603

 
949

Reclassification adjustment of interest rate swaps, net (b)
 
(101
)
 
(294
)
 
(320
)
 
(606
)
Unrealized loss on available-for-sale securities, net (c)
 
(4,146
)
 

 
(3,651
)
 

Foreign currency translation adjustments
 
(24,247
)
 
(22,840
)
 
(30,910
)
 
(46,808
)
Total comprehensive income
 
$
30,632

 
$
29,604

 
$
77,098

 
$
58,343


(a)
Net of tax effect of $(151) and $(299) for the three months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. Net of tax effect of $(342) and $(526) for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.
(b)
Net of tax effect of $56 and $157 for the three months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively. Net of tax effect of $ 178 and $332 for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.
(c)
Net of tax effect of $(282) for the three months ended January 31, 2016 . Net of tax effect of $ (3) for the six months ended January 31, 2016 .

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

5


Copart, Inc.
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
 
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
 
2016
 
2015
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
111,376

 
$
104,808

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
 
23,294

 
25,367

Allowance for doubtful accounts
 
1,270

 
(242
)
Equity in losses of unconsolidated affiliates
 
483

 

Stock-based payment compensation
 
10,800

 
8,870

Excess tax benefit from stock-based payment compensation
 
(241
)
 
(534
)
Gain on sale of property and equipment
 
(106
)
 
(457
)
Deferred income taxes
 
(106
)
 
(2,317
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects from acquisitions:
 
 
 
 
Accounts receivable
 
(68,683
)
 
(40,908
)
Vehicle pooling costs
 
(5,139
)
 
(2,125
)
Inventories
 
(1,310
)
 
(1,226
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
 
(216
)
 
1,747

Other assets
 
448

 
5,368

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
 
3,702

 
(4,173
)
Deferred revenue
 
1,810

 
351

Income taxes receivable
 
(1,410
)
 
(4,938
)
Income taxes payable
 
7,897

 
103

Other liabilities
 
(789
)
 
(811
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
 
83,080

 
88,883

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
Purchases of property and equipment
 
(77,763
)
 
(39,459
)
Proceeds from sale of property and equipment
 
296

 
525

Proceeds from sale of assets held for sale
 
100

 
217

Purchases of marketable securities
 
(21,119
)
 

Net cash used in investing activities
 
(98,486
)
 
(38,717
)
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
 
Proceeds from the exercise of stock options
 
944

 
2,303

Excess tax benefit from stock-based payment compensation
 
241

 
534

Proceeds from the issuance of Employee Stock Purchase Plan shares
 
1,640

 
1,495

Repurchases of common stock
 
(325,000
)
 
(1,121
)
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt, net of discount
 

 
698,939

Proceeds from revolving loan facility, net of repayments
 
68,000

 

Debt offering costs
 

 
(955
)
Principal payments on long-term debt
 
(37,500
)
 
(312,500
)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
 
(291,675
)
 
388,695

Effect of foreign currency translation
 
(7,515
)
 
(7,163
)
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents
 
(314,596
)
 
431,698

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
 
456,012

 
158,668

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
 
$
141,416

 
$
590,366

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
 
 
 
 
Interest paid
 
$
11,294

 
$
3,788

Income taxes paid, net of refunds
 
$
55,413

 
$
64,432


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

6


Copart, Inc.
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

January 31, 2016
(Unaudited)
NOTE 1 – Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Description of Business
Copart, Inc. (the Company) provides vehicle sellers with a full range of services to process and sell vehicles over the Internet through the Company’s Virtual Bidding Third Generation (VB3) Internet auction-style sales technology. Sellers are primarily insurance companies but also include banks and financial institutions, charities, car dealerships, fleet operators, vehicle rental companies, as well as cars sourced from the general public. The Company sells principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers, and exporters; however, at certain locations, the Company sells directly to the general public. The majority of vehicles sold on behalf of insurance companies are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss or not economically repairable by the insurance companies or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. The Company offers vehicle sellers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the vehicle sales process, minimize administrative and processing costs and maximize the ultimate sales price. In the United States and Canada (North America), Brazil, the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), Oman, Bahrain, and India, the Company sells vehicles primarily as an agent and derives revenue primarily from fees paid by vehicle sellers and vehicle buyers as well as related fees for services, such as towing and storage. In the United Kingdom (U.K.), the Company operates both on a principal basis, purchasing the salvage vehicle outright from the insurance company and reselling the vehicle for its own account, and as an agent. In Germany and Spain, the Company derives revenue from sales listing fees for listing vehicles on behalf of insurance companies.
Principles of Consolidation
The consolidated financial statements of the Company include the accounts of the parent company and its domestic and foreign wholly-owned subsidiaries. Intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.
In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments of a normal recurring nature, considered necessary for fair presentation of its financial position as of January 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 , its consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income for the three and six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , and its cash flows for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 . Interim results for the six months ended January 31, 2016 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future period, or for the entire year ending July 31, 2016 . These consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. The interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2015 .
Use of Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Estimates include but are not limited to, vehicle pooling costs; self-insured reserves; allowance for doubtful accounts; income taxes; revenue recognition; stock-based payment compensation; purchase price allocations; long-lived asset and goodwill impairment calculations; and contingencies. Actual results could differ from these estimates.
Revenue Recognition
The Company provides a portfolio of services to its sellers and buyers that facilitate the sale and delivery of a vehicle from seller to buyer. These services include the ability to use the Company’s Internet sales technology and vehicle delivery, loading, title processing, preparation and storage. The Company evaluates multiple-element arrangements relative to its member and seller agreements.
The services provided to the seller of a vehicle involve disposing of a vehicle on the seller’s behalf and, under most of the Company’s current North American contracts, collecting the proceeds from the member. The Company applies Accounting Standard Update 2009-13, Revenue Recognition (Topic 605): Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements (ASU 2009-13) for revenue recognition. Pre-sale services, including towing, title processing, preparation and storage, as well as sale fees and other enhancement services meet the criteria for separate units of accounting. Revenue associated with each service is recognized upon completion of the respective service, net of applicable rebates or allowances. For certain sellers who are charged a proportionate fee based on high bid of the vehicle, the revenue associated with the pre-sale services is recognized upon completion of the sale when the total arrangement is fixed and determinable.

7


The estimated selling price of each service is determined based on management’s best estimate and allotted based on the relative selling price method.
Vehicle sales, where vehicles are purchased and remarketed on the Company’s own behalf, are recognized on the sale date, which is typically the point of high bid acceptance. Upon high bid acceptance, a legal binding contract is formed with the member, and the gross sales price is recorded as revenue.
The Company also provides a number of services to the buyer of the vehicle, charging a separate fee for each service. Each of these services has been assessed to determine whether the requirements have been met to separate them into units of accounting within a multiple-element arrangement. The Company has concluded that the sale and the post-sale services are separate units of accounting. The fees for sale services are recognized upon completion of the sale, and the fees for the post-sale services are recognized upon successful completion of those services using the relative selling price method.
The Company also charges members an annual registration fee for the right to participate in its vehicle sales program, which is recognized ratably over the term of the arrangement, and relist and late-payment fees, which are recognized upon receipt of payment by the member. No provision for returns has been established, as all sales are final with no right of return, although the Company provides for bad debt expense in the case of non-performance by its members or sellers.
The Company allocates arrangement consideration based upon management’s best estimate of the selling price of the separate units of accounting contained within arrangements including multiple deliverables. Significant inputs in the Company’s estimates of the selling price of separate units of accounting include market and pricing trends, pricing customization and practices, and profit objectives for the services.
Vehicle Pooling Costs
The Company defers in vehicle pooling costs certain yard operation expenses associated with vehicles consigned to and received by the Company, but not sold as of the end of the period. The Company quantifies the deferred costs using a calculation that includes the number of vehicles at its facilities at the beginning and end of the period, the number of vehicles sold during the period and an allocation of certain yard operation costs of the period. The primary expenses allocated and deferred are certain facility costs, labor, transportation, and vehicle processing. If the allocation factors change, then yard operation expenses could increase or decrease correspondingly in the future. These costs are expensed as vehicles are sold in subsequent periods on an average cost basis. Given the fixed cost nature of the Company’s business, there are no direct correlations for increases in expenses or units processed on vehicle pooling costs.
The Company applies the provisions of accounting guidance for subsequent measurement of inventory to its vehicle pooling costs. The provision requires that items such as idle facility expenses, double freight and rehandling costs be recognized as current period charges regardless of whether they meet the criteria of “abnormal” as provided in the guidance. In addition, the guidance requires that the allocation of fixed production overhead to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of production facilities.
Foreign Currency Translation
The Company records foreign currency translation adjustments from the process of translating the functional currency of the financial statements of its foreign subsidiaries into the U.S. dollar reporting currency. The Canadian dollar, British pound, U.A.E. dirham, Bahraini dinar, Omani rial, Brazilian real, Indian rupee, and Euro are the functional currencies of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries as they are the primary currencies within the economic environment in which each subsidiary operates. The original equity investment in the respective subsidiaries is translated at historical rates. Assets and liabilities of the respective subsidiary’s operations are translated into U.S. dollars at period-end exchange rates, and revenues and expenses are translated into U.S. dollars at average exchange rates in effect during each reporting period. Adjustments resulting from the translation of each subsidiary’s financial statements are reported in other comprehensive income.
The cumulative effects of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations were as follows (in thousands):
Cumulative loss on foreign currency translation as of July 31, 2014
$
(18,992
)
Loss on foreign currency translation
(49,518
)
Cumulative loss on foreign currency translation as of July 31, 2015
$
(68,510
)
Loss on foreign currency translation
(30,910
)
Cumulative loss on foreign currency translation as of January 31, 2016
$
(99,420
)

8


Income Taxes and Deferred Tax Assets
Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities, their respective tax basis, and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.
In accordance with the provisions of ASC 740, Income Taxes , a two-step approach is applied to the recognition and measurement of uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The first step is to determine if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained in an audit, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely to be realized upon ultimate settlement. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions in the provision for income taxes on its consolidated statements of income.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with original maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents include cash held in checking, domestic certificates of deposit, and money market accounts. The Company periodically invests its excess cash in money market funds and U.S. Treasury Bills. The Company’s cash and cash equivalents are placed with high credit quality financial institutions.
Marketable Securities
Marketable securities consist of marketable equity securities and are classified as available-for-sale and stated at fair value. The cost basis of the marketable securities is based on the specific identification method. Unrealized gains or losses relating to available-for-sale securities are recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income, net of income taxes. Reclassification adjustments out of accumulated other comprehensive income resulting from realized gains or losses from the sale of available-for-sale securities are included in other income. As of January 31, 2016 , the cost basis of the marketable securities was $21.1 million with a fair value of $17.5 million , resulting in an unrealized loss , net of tax of $3.6 million recorded in other comprehensive income.
Other Assets
Other assets consist of long-term deposits, contracted prepayments, notes receivable, and investments in unconsolidated affiliates. In accordance with ASC 323, Investments-Equity Method and Joint Ventures, the Company uses the equity method to account for investments in joint ventures and other unconsolidated entities if the Company has the ability to exercise significant influence over the financial and operating policies of those investees. Under the equity method, the Company records the initial investment in an entity at cost and subsequently adjusts the investment for the Company's share of the affiliate's undistributed earnings (losses) and distributions recorded in other income. The Company reviews the carrying amount of the investments in unconsolidated affiliates annually, or whenever circumstances indicate that the value of these investments may have declined. If the Company determines an investment is impaired on an other-than-temporary basis, a loss equal to the difference between the fair value of the investment and its carrying amount is recorded.
Fair Value of Financial Instruments
The Company records its financial assets and liabilities at fair value in accordance with the framework for measuring fair value in U.S. GAAP. In accordance with ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures , as amended by Accounting Standards Update 2011-04, the Company considers fair value as an exit price, representing the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants under current market conditions. This framework establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value:
Level I
Observable inputs that reflect unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities traded in active markets.
Level II
Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level I that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Interest rate hedges are valued at exit prices obtained from the counter-party.
Level III
Inputs that are generally unobservable. These inputs may be used with internally developed methodologies that result in management’s best estimate.
The amounts recorded for financial instruments in the Company's consolidated financial statements, which included cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, and revolving loan facility approximated their fair values as of January 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 , due to the short-term nature of those instruments, and are classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy. Cash equivalents are classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy because they are valued using quoted market prices of the underlying investments. See Note 2 – Long-Term Debt , Note 5 – Fair Value Measures , and Note 12 – Acquisitions .

9


Derivatives and Hedging
The Company had entered into two interest rate swaps to eliminate interest rate risk on the Company’s variable interest rate debt, and the swaps were designated as effective cash flow hedges under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging. See Note 3 – Derivatives and Hedging . Each quarter, the Company measured hedge effectiveness using the “hypothetical derivative method” and recorded in earnings any hedge ineffectiveness with the effective portion of the change in fair value recorded in other comprehensive income or loss. The interest rate swaps expired in December 2015.
Capitalized Software Costs
The Company capitalizes system development costs and website development costs related to the enterprise computing services during the application development stage. Costs related to preliminary project activities and post implementation activities are expensed as incurred. Internal-use software is amortized on a straight-line basis over its estimated useful life, generally three years. The Company evaluates the useful lives of these assets on an annual basis and tests for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances occur that impact the recoverability of these assets.
Total gross capitalized software as of January 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 was $70.5 million and $65.1 million , respectively. Accumulated amortization expense related to software as of January 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 totaled $45.6 million and $42.6 million , respectively.
Accounting for Acquisitions
The Company recognizes and measures identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed in acquired entities in accordance with ASC 805, Business Combinations . The accounting for acquisitions involves significant judgments and estimates, including the fair value of certain forms of consideration, the fair value of acquired intangible assets, which involve projections of future revenues, cash flows and terminal value, which are then either discounted at an estimated discount rate or measured at an estimated royalty rate, and the fair value of other acquired assets and assumed liabilities, including potential contingencies and the useful lives of the assets. The projections are developed using internal forecasts, available industry and market data and estimates of long-term growth rates of the Company. Historical experience is additionally utilized, in which historical or current costs have approximated fair value for certain assets acquired.
Segments and Other Geographic Reporting
The Company’s North American and U.K. regions are considered two separate operating segments, which have been aggregated into one reportable segment because they share similar economic characteristics.
NOTE 2 – Long-Term Debt
Credit Facility
On December 14, 2010, the Company entered into an Amended and Restated Credit Facility Agreement (Credit Facility), with Bank of America, N.A. The Credit Facility was an unsecured credit agreement providing for (i) a $100.0 million revolving credit facility, including a $100.0 million alternative currency borrowing sublimit and a $50.0 million letter of credit sublimit and (ii) a term loan facility of $400.0 million . On September, 29, 2011, the Company amended the Credit Facility increasing the amount of the term loan facility from $400.0 million to $500.0 million .
Credit Agreement
On December 3, 2014 , the Company entered into a Credit Agreement with Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as administrative agent, and Bank of America, N.A., as syndication agent, which superseded the Credit Facility. The Credit Agreement provides for (a) a secured revolving loan facility in an aggregate principal amount of up to $300.0 million , none of which was outstanding at July 31, 2015 and $68.0 million was outstanding at January 31, 2016 (Revolving Loan Facility), and (b) a secured term loan facility in an aggregate principal amount of $300.0 million (Term Loan), which was fully drawn at closing. Proceeds from the Credit Agreement were used to repay all outstanding amounts under the Credit Facility totaling $275.0 million at December 3, 2014. The remaining proceeds are being used for general corporate purposes. The Revolving Loan Facility and the Term Loan facility mature on December 3, 2019 .
The Term Loan, which as of January 31, 2016 , had $206.3 million outstanding, amortized $18.8 million each quarter during December 31, 2014 through December 31, 2015 , then amortizes $7.5 million each quarter, with all outstanding borrowings due on December 3, 2019 . All amounts borrowed under the Term Loan may be prepaid without premium or penalty.

10


The Revolving Loan Facility and Term Loan under the Credit Agreement bear interest, at the election of the Company, at either (a) the Base Rate, which is defined as a fluctuating rate per annum equal to the greatest of (i) the Prime Rate in effect on such day; (ii) the Federal Funds Rate in effect on such date plus 0.50% ; or (iii) an adjusted LIBOR rate determined on the basis of a one-month interest period plus 1.0% , in each case plus an applicable margin ranging from 0.25% to 1.0% based on the Company’s consolidated total net leverage ratio during the preceding fiscal quarter; or (b) an adjusted LIBOR rate plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.25% to 2.0% depending on the Company’s consolidated total net leverage ratio during the preceding fiscal quarter. Interest is due and payable quarterly, in arrears, for loans bearing interest at the Base Rate, and at the end of an interest period (or at each three month interval in the case of loans with interest periods greater than three months) in the case of loans bearing interest at the adjusted LIBOR rate. The interest rate as of January 31, 2016 on the Company’s variable interest rate debt was the one month LIBOR rate of 0.43% plus an applicable margin of 1.25%. The carrying amount of the Credit Agreement is comprised of borrowings under which interest accrues under a fluctuating interest rate structure. Accordingly, the carrying value approximates fair value at January 31, 2016 , and was classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy.
Amounts borrowed under the Revolving Loan Facility may be repaid and reborrowed until the maturity date of December 3, 2019 . The Company is obligated to pay a commitment fee on the unused portion of the Revolving Loan Facility. The commitment fee rate ranges from 0.20% to 0.35% , depending on the Company’s consolidated total net leverage ratio during the preceding fiscal quarter, on the average daily unused portion of the revolving credit commitment under the Credit Agreement. The Company had $68.0 million of outstanding borrowings under the Revolving Loan Facility as of January 31, 2016 and none were outstanding at July 31, 2015 .
The Company’s obligations under the Credit Agreement are guaranteed by certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries meeting materiality thresholds set forth in the Credit Agreement. Such obligations, including the guaranties, are secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and the assets of the subsidiary guarantors pursuant to a Security Agreement, dated December 3, 2014, among the Company, the subsidiary guarantors from time to time party thereto, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as collateral agent.
The Credit Agreement contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including covenants that limit or restrict the Company and its subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things, incur indebtedness, grant liens, merge or consolidate, dispose of assets, make investments, make acquisitions, enter into transactions with affiliates, pay dividends, or make distributions on and repurchase stock, in each case subject to certain exceptions. The Company is also required to maintain compliance, measured at the end of each fiscal quarter, with a consolidated total net leverage ratio and a consolidated interest coverage ratio. The Company was in compliance with all covenants related to the Credit Agreement as of January 31, 2016 .
Note Purchase Agreement
On December 3, 2014 , the Company entered into a Note Purchase Agreement and sold to certain purchasers (collectively, the Purchasers) $400.0 million in aggregate principal amount of senior secured notes (Senior Notes) consisting of (i) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.07% Senior Notes, Series A, due December 3, 2024 ; (ii) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.19% Senior Notes, Series B, due December 3, 2026 ; (iii) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.25% Senior Notes, Series C, due December 3, 2027 ; and (iv) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.35% Senior Notes, Series D, due December 3, 2029 . Interest is due and payable quarterly, in arrears, on each of the Senior Notes. Proceeds from the Note Purchase Agreement are being used for general corporate purposes.
The Company may prepay the Senior Notes, in whole or in part, at any time, subject to certain conditions, including minimum amounts and payment of a make-whole amount equal to the discounted value of the remaining scheduled interest payments under the Senior Notes.
The Company’s obligations under the Note Purchase Agreement are guaranteed by certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries meeting materiality thresholds set forth in the Note Purchase Agreement. Such obligations, including the guaranties, are secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and the subsidiary guarantors. The obligations of the Company and its subsidiary guarantors under the Note Purchase Agreement will be treated on a pari passu basis with the obligations of those entities under the Credit Agreement as well as any additional debt the Company may obtain.
The Note Purchase Agreement contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including covenants that limit or restrict the Company and its subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things, incur indebtedness, grant liens, merge or consolidate, dispose of assets, make investments, make acquisitions, enter into transactions with affiliates, pay dividends, or make distributions and repurchase stock, in each case subject to certain exceptions. The Company is also required to maintain compliance, measured at the end of each fiscal quarter, with a consolidated total net leverage ratio and a consolidated interest coverage ratio. The Company was in compliance with all covenants related to the Note Purchase Agreement as of January 31, 2016 .
Related to the execution of the Credit Agreement and the Note Purchase Agreement, the Company incurred $2.1 million in costs, of which $1.0 million was capitalized as debt issuance fees and $1.1 million was recorded as a reduction of the long-term debt proceeds as a debt discount. Both the debt issuance fees and debt discount are amortized to interest expense over the term of the respective debt instruments.

11


NOTE 3 – Derivatives and Hedging
The Company had entered into two interest rate swaps to exchange its variable interest rate payments commitment for fixed interest rate payments through December 2015. The swaps were designated effective cash flow hedges under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging . Each quarter, the Company measured hedge effectiveness using the “hypothetical derivative method” and recorded in earnings any hedge ineffectiveness with the effective portion of the change in fair value recorded in other comprehensive income or loss. The Company has reclassified $0.2 million and $0.4 million for the three months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively, and $0.5 million and $0.9 million for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively, out of other comprehensive income into interest expense.
The interest rate swaps were classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy as the derivatives were valued using observable inputs. The Company determined fair value of the derivative utilizing observable market data of swap rates and basis rates. These inputs were placed into a pricing model using a discounted cash flow methodology in order to calculate the mark-to-market value of the interest rate swaps. The interest rate swaps expired in December 2015. As of July 31, 2015 , the Company’s fair value of the interest rate swaps was $0.4 million and was classified as other liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets.
NOTE 4 – Goodwill and Intangible Assets
The following table sets forth amortizable intangible assets by major asset class:
(In thousands)
January 31, 2016
 
July 31, 2015

Amortized intangibles:
 
 
 
Covenants not to compete
$
1,663

 
$
1,691

Supply contracts & customer relationships
26,459

 
27,506

Trade name
5,097

 
5,129

Licenses and databases
2,470

 
2,498

Accumulated amortization
(21,281
)
 
(18,967
)
Net intangibles
$
14,408

 
$
17,857

Aggregate amortization expense on amortizable intangible assets was $1.5 million and $1.7 million for the three months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively, and $3.0 million and $3.6 million for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively,
The change in the carrying amount of goodwill was as follows (in thousands):
Balance as of July 31, 2015
$
271,850

Effect of foreign currency exchange rates
(7,722
)
Balance as of January 31, 2016
$
264,128


12


NOTE 5 – Fair Value Measures
The following table summarizes the fair value of the Company's financial assets and liabilities measured and recorded at fair value on a recurring basis based on inputs used to derive their fair values:
 
January 31, 2016
 
July 31, 2015
(In thousands)
Fair Value Total
 
Observable Inputs
(Level I)
 
Significant Observable Inputs
(Level II)
 
Fair Value Total
 
Significant Observable Inputs
(Level II)
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents
$
2,584

 
$

 
$
2,584

 
$
2,121

 
$
2,121

Marketable equity securities
17,465

 
17,465

 

 

 

Total Assets
$
20,049

 
$
17,465

 
$
2,584

 
$
2,121

 
$
2,121

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long-term variable rate debt, including current portion
$
206,250

 
$

 
$
206,250

 
$
243,750

 
$
243,750

Long-term fixed rate debt, including current portion
411,751

 

 
411,751

 
403,375

 
403,375

Revolving loan facility
68,000

 

 
68,000

 

 

Interest rate swap derivative

 

 

 
446

 
446

Total Liabilities
$
686,001

 
$

 
$
686,001

 
$
647,571

 
$
647,571


During the six months ended January 31, 2016 , no transfers were made between any levels within the fair value hierarchy. See Note 1 – Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies , Note 2 – Long-Term Debt , Note 3 – Derivatives and Hedging , and Note 12 – Acquisitions .
NOTE 6 – Net Income Per Share
The table below reconciles basic weighted shares outstanding to diluted weighted average shares outstanding:
 
Three Months Ended 
 January 31,
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
2016
 
2015
 
2016
 
2015
Weighted average common shares outstanding
117,306

 
126,300

 
118,731

 
126,258

Effect of dilutive securities - stock options
5,602

 
5,572

 
5,509

 
5,436

Weighted average common and dilutive potential common shares outstanding
122,908

 
131,872

 
124,240

 
131,694

There were no material adjustments to net income required in calculating diluted net income per share. Excluded from the dilutive earnings per share calculation were 7,750,598 and 5,104,400 stock options for the three months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively, and 7,713,448 and 5,148,374 shares for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively, because their inclusion would have been anti-dilutive.
NOTE 7 – Stock-based Payment Compensation
The Company recognizes compensation expense for stock option awards on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The following is a summary of activity for the Company’s stock options for the six months ended January 31, 2016 :
(In thousands, except per share and term data)
 
Shares
 
Weighted Average Exercise Price
 
Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term (In years)
 
Aggregate Intrinsic Value
Outstanding as of July 31, 2015
 
21,011

 
$
23.65

 
5.78
 
$
261,339

Grants of options
 
370

 
38.50

 
 
 
 
Exercises
 
(100
)
 
17.42

 
 
 
 
Forfeitures or expirations
 
(57
)
 
35.88

 
 
 
 
Outstanding as of January 31, 2016
 
21,224

 
$
23.91

 
5.37
 
$
223,358

Exercisable as of January 31, 2016
 
15,204

 
$
19.24

 
4.09
 
$
221,706


13


The aggregate intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the underlying awards and the quoted price of the Company’s common stock. The number of options that were in-the-money was 13,324,066 at January 31, 2016 .
The table below sets forth the stock-based payment compensation recognized by the Company:
 
Three Months Ended January 31,
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
2016
 
2015
 
2016
 
2015
General and administrative
$
4,710

 
$
3,955

 
$
9,438

 
$
7,775

Yard operations
676

 
549

 
1,362

 
1,095

Total stock-based payment compensation
$
5,386

 
$
4,504

 
$
10,800

 
$
8,870

In accordance with ASC 718 , Compensation – Stock Compensation , the Company made an estimate of expected forfeitures and recognized compensation cost only for those equity awards expected to vest.
In October 2013, the Compensation Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors, subject to stockholder approval (which was subsequently obtained at the December 16, 2013 annual meeting of stockholders), approved the grant to each of A. Jayson Adair, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, and Vincent W. Mitz, the Company’s President, of nonqualified stock options to purchase 2,000,000 and 1,500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, respectively, at an exercise price of $35.62 per share, which equaled the closing price of the Company’s common stock on December 16, 2013, the effective date of grant. Such grants were made in lieu of any cash salary or bonus compensation in excess of $1.00 per year or the grant of any additional equity incentives for a five -year period. Each option will become exercisable over five years, subject to continued service by Mr. Adair and Mr. Mitz, with 20% vesting on April 15, 2015 and December 16, 2014, respectively, and the balance vesting monthly over the subsequent four years.  Each option will become fully vested, assuming continued service on April 15, 2019 and December 16, 2018, respectively. If, upon or following a change in control, either the Company or a successor entity terminates the executive’s service without cause, or the executive resigns for good reason (as defined in the option agreement), then 100% of the shares subject to his stock option will immediately vest. On June 2, 2015, the Compensation Committee of the Company's Board of Directors approved the amendment of each of the stand-alone stock option agreements, by and between the Company and A. Jayson Adair and Vincent W. Mitz, respectively, to remove the provision providing at times prior to a "change in control" for the immediate vesting in full of the underlying option upon an involuntary termination of Mr. Adair or Mr. Mitz, as applicable, without "cause." The fair value of each option at the date of grant was $11.43 . The total estimated compensation expense to be recognized by the Company over the five year estimated service period for these options is $40.0 million . The Company recognized $3.8 million in compensation expenses for these grants in the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 .
NOTE 8 – Common Stock Repurchases
On September 22, 2011 , the Company's board of directors approved a 40 million share increase in the Company's stock repurchase program, bringing the total current authorization to 98 million shares. The repurchases may be effected through solicited or unsolicited transactions in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. No time limit has been placed on the duration of the stock repurchase program. Subject to applicable securities laws, such repurchases will be made at such times and in such amounts as the Company deems appropriate and may be discontinued at any time. The Company did not repurchase any common stock under the program during the six months ended January 31, 2016 or 2015 . As of January 31, 2016 , the total number of shares repurchased under the program was 50,518,282 , and 47,481,718 shares were available for repurchase under the program.
On December 30, 2015 , the Company completed a modified "Dutch Auction" tender offer, or tender offer, to purchase up to 7,317,073 shares of its common stock at a price not greater than $41.00 nor less than $38.00 per share. In connection with the tender offer, the Company accepted for payment an aggregate of 8,333,333 shares of its common stock at a purchase price of $39.00 per share for a total value of $325.0 million . The Company's directors and executive officers did not participate in the tender offer. The shares repurchased as a result of the tender offer are not part of the Company's stock repurchase program.
In fiscal 2015, certain executive officers and employees exercised stock options through cashless exercises. A portion of the options exercised were net settled in satisfaction of the exercise price and federal and state minimum statutory tax withholding requirements. The Company remitted $1.1 million for the six months ended January 31, 2015 to the proper taxing authorities in satisfaction of the employees' minimum statutory withholding requirements.

14


The stock options exercised by certain employees and executive officers through cashless exercises are summarized in the following table:
Period
 
Options
Exercised
 
Weighted Average Exercise Price
 
Shares Net
Settled for
Exercise
 
Shares
Withheld for
Taxes (1)
 
Net Shares
to
Employees
 
Weighted Average Share Price for Withholding
 
Tax
Withholdings
(in 000s)
FY 2015—Q1
 
201,333

 
$
19.59

 
124,621

 
35,416

 
41,296

 
$
31.65

 
$
1,121

FY 2015—Q3
 
139,690

 
$
20.27

 
76,021

 
20,656

 
43,013

 
$
37.27

 
$
770

FY 2015—Q4
 
200,000

 
$
12.02

 
66,602

 
52,158

 
81,240

 
$
36.08

 
$
1,882

(1) Shares withheld for taxes are treated as a repurchase of shares for accounting purposes but do not count against the Company's stock repurchase program.
No stock options were exercised by certain employees and executive officers through cashless exercises during the three months ended January 31, 2015, October 31, 2015, and January 31, 2016.
NOTE 9 – Income Taxes
The Company applies the provisions of the accounting standard for uncertain tax positions to its income taxes. For benefits to be realized, a tax position must be more likely than not to be sustained upon examination. The amount recognized is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement.
As of January 31, 2016 , the gross amounts of the Company’s liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits of $23.7 million , including interest and penalties, were classified as long-term income taxes payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. Over the next twelve months, the Company’s existing positions will continue to generate an increase in liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits, as well as a likely decrease in liabilities as a result of the lapse of the applicable statute of limitations and the conclusion of income tax audits. The expected decrease in liabilities relating to unrecognized tax benefits will have a positive effect on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position when realized. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions in income tax expense.
The Company files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, various states and foreign jurisdictions. The Company is currently under examination by certain taxing authorities in the U.S. for fiscal years between 2011 and 2013. At this time, the Company does not believe that the outcome of any examination will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position.
The Company has not provided for U.S. federal income and foreign withholding taxes on its foreign subsidiaries’ undistributed earnings as of January 31, 2016 because the Company intends to reinvest such earnings indefinitely in its foreign operations. Specifically, the earnings will be dedicated to the following areas outside the U.S. (i) funding operating and capital spending needs in existing foreign markets; (ii) funding merger and acquisition deals both in existing and new foreign markets; and (iii) other investments to help expand the Company's footprint in foreign emerging markets. The Company does not anticipate the need for any foreign cash in the U.S. operations. It is not practical to determine the taxes that might be incurred if these earnings were to be distributed in the form of dividends or otherwise. If distributed, however, foreign tax credits may become available under current law to reduce or eliminate the resultant U.S. income tax liability.
NOTE 10 – Recent Accounting Pronouncements
In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-17, Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes , which requires companies to classify all deferred tax assets and liabilities as non-current on the balance sheet, rather than separating deferred taxes into current and non-current amounts. This ASU is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016 and can be adopted prospectively or retrospectively; however, early adoption is permitted. The Company’s adoption of ASU 2015-17 will not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position.
In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-03, Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30), which requires that debt issuance costs related to a recognized debt liability be presented in the balance sheet as a direct deduction from the carrying amount of that debt liability, consistent with debt discounts. The recognition and measurement guidance for debt issuance costs are not affected by the amendments in this ASU. The amendments are effective for financial statements issued for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2015. The amendments are to be applied on a retrospective basis, wherein the balance sheet of each individual period presented is adjusted to reflect the period-specific effects of applying the new guidance. The Company’s adoption of ASU 2015-03 will not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position.

15


In February 2015, the FASB issued ASU 2015-02, Consolidation (Topic 810), which is intended to improve targeted areas of consolidation guidance for legal entities such as limited partnerships, limited liability corporations, and securitization structures (collateralized debt obligations, collateralized loan obligations, and mortgage-backed security transactions). The ASU focuses on the consolidation evaluation for reporting organizations that are required to evaluate whether they should consolidate certain legal entities. In addition to reducing the number of consolidation models from four to two, the new standard simplifies the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and improves current U.S. GAAP by placing more emphasis on risk of loss when determining a controlling financial interest, reducing the frequency of the application of related-party guidance when determining a controlling financial interest in a variable interest entity (VIE), and changing consolidation conclusions for companies in several industries that typically make use of limited partnerships or VIEs. The ASU will be effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2015. The Company’s adoption of ASU 2015-02 will not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position.
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606), which supersedes the revenue recognition requirements in ASC 605, Revenue Recognition . ASU 2014-09 is based on the principle that revenue is recognized to depict the transfer of goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASU 2014-09 also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and changes in judgments and assets recognized from costs incurred to obtain or fulfill a contract. ASU 2014-09 is effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2017. ASU 2014-09 allows adoption with either retrospective application to each period presented or retrospective application with the cumulative effect recognized as of the date of initial application. The Company has not determined the potential effects of implementing ASU 2014-09 on the consolidated financial statements.
NOTE 11 – Legal Proceedings
The Company is subject to threats of litigation and is involved in actual litigation and damage claims arising in the ordinary course of business, such as actions related to injuries, property damage, and handling or disposal of vehicles. The material pending legal proceedings to which the Company is a party, or of which any of the Company’s property is subject, include the following matters.
On November 1, 2013, the Company filed suit against Sparta Consulting, Inc. (now known as KPIT) in the 44th Judicial District Court of Dallas County, Texas, alleging fraud, fraudulent inducement, and/or promissory fraud, negligent misrepresentation, unfair business practices pursuant to California Business and Professions Code § 17200, breach of contract, declaratory judgment, and attorney’s fees. The Company seeks compensatory and exemplary damages, disgorgement of amounts paid, attorney’s fees, pre- and post-judgment interest, costs of suit, and a judicial declaration of the parties’ rights, duties, and obligations under the Implementation Services Agreement dated October 6, 2011. The suit arises out of the Company’s September 17, 2013 decision to terminate the Implementation Services Agreement, under which KPIT was to design, implement, and deliver a customized replacement enterprise resource planning system for the Company. On January 2, 2014, KPIT removed this suit to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas. On August 11, 2014, the Northern District of Texas transferred the suit to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California for convenience. On January 8, 2014, KPIT filed suit against the Company in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, alleging breach of contract, promissory estoppel, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, account stated, quantum meruit, unjust enrichment, and declaratory relief. KPIT seeks compensatory and exemplary damages, prejudgment interest, costs of suit, and a judicial declaration of the parties’ rights, duties, and obligations under the Implementation Services Agreement. The Company is pursuing its claim for damages, and defending KPIT’s claim for damages.
The Company provides for costs relating to these matters when a loss is probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. The effect of the outcome of these matters on the Company’s future consolidated results of operations and cash flows cannot be predicted because any such effect depends on future results of operations and the amount and timing of the resolution of such matters. The Company believes that any ultimate liability will not have a material effect on its consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows. However, the amount of the liabilities associated with these claims, if any, cannot be determined with certainty. The Company maintains insurance which may or may not provide coverage for claims made against the Company. There is no assurance that there will be insurance coverage available when and if needed. Additionally, the insurance that the Company carries requires that the Company pay for costs and/or claims exposure up to the amount of the insurance deductibles negotiated when the insurance is purchased.
Governmental Proceedings
The Georgia Department of Revenue, or DOR, has conducted a sales and use tax audit of the Company’s operations in Georgia for the period from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011. As a result of their initial audit, the DOR issued a notice of proposed assessment for uncollected sales taxes in which it asserted that the Company failed to collect and remit sales taxes totaling $73.8 million , including penalties and interest. According to the DOR, the proposed assessment was based on its initial determination that the Company's sales did not constitute nontaxable sales for resale.

16


The Company subsequently engaged a Georgia law firm and outside tax advisors to review the conduct of its business operations in Georgia, the notice of proposed assessment, and the DOR’s policy position. In particular, the Company’s outside legal counsel provided the Company an opinion that the sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax. In rendering its opinion, the Company’s counsel noted that non-U.S. registered resellers are unable to comply strictly with technical requirements for a Georgia certificate of exemption but concluded that its sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax notwithstanding this technical inability to comply.
Since the Company's receipt of the notice of proposed assessment, the Company and its counsel have engaged in active discussions with the DOR to resolve the matter. On June 5, 2015 , following the Company's discussions and after additional review of documentation, the DOR provided the Company with revised audit work papers computing a sales tax liability of $2.7 million before interest and any penalties.
On June 22, 2015 , representatives of the DOR and the Office of the Attorney General for the State of Georgia informed the Company's counsel that the DOR intended to issue a formal notice of assessment for an estimated $100.0 million , based on the DOR’s original proposed assessment of $73.8 million plus additional accumulated interest and penalties. On August 4, 2015 , the DOR issued an official Assessment and Demand for Payment for $96.1 million for sales taxes, penalties, and interest that the DOR alleges the Company owes the State of Georgia. The Company filed an appeal of this notice of assessment from the DOR with the Georgia Tax Tribunal on September 3, 2015.

Based on the opinion from the Company’s outside law firm, advice from its outside tax advisors, and the Company's best estimate of a probable outcome, the Company has adequately provided for the payment of any assessment in its consolidated financial statements. The Company believes it has strong defenses to the DOR’s notice of assessment and intends to defend this matter. There can be no assurance that this matter will be resolved in the Company’s favor or that the Company will not ultimately be required to make a substantial payment to the Georgia DOR. The Company understands that litigating and defending the matter in Georgia could be expensive and time-consuming and result in substantial management distraction. If the matter were to be resolved in a manner adverse to the Company, it could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position.
NOTE 12 – Acquisitions
During the year ended July 31, 2014, the Company acquired one facility in Montreal, Canada; a salvage vehicle auction business in Brazil, which did not include any facilities; as well as the assets of an online marketing company, which included the rights to hundreds of web domains including www.cashforcars.com and www.cash4cars.com.
During the year ended July 31, 2015 , the purchase price allocations for the assets of the online marketing company and the salvage vehicle auction businesses in Montreal, Canada and Brazil were finalized. As a result, from the preliminary purchase price allocation as of July 31, 2014, goodwill decreased $0.8 million , primarily related to a $0.9 million increase in intangible assets, and changes to deferred taxes on acquired intangible assets. In accordance with ASC 805, any adjustments to the fair value of acquired assets and liabilities that occur subsequent to the measurement period will be reflected in the Company’s results of operations. There were no acquisitions during the six months ended January 31, 2016 .
These acquisitions were undertaken because of their strategic fit and have been accounted for using the purchase method in accordance with ASC 805, Business Combinations , which resulted in the recognition of goodwill in the Company's consolidated financial statements. Goodwill arose because the purchase price of each acquisition reflected a number of factors, including their future earnings and cash flow potential; the multiple to earnings, cash flow and other factors at which similar businesses have been purchased by other acquirers; the competitive nature of the process by which the Company acquired these businesses; and the complementary strategic fit and resulting synergies brought to existing operations. Goodwill that arose from these acquisitions was within Level III of the fair value hierarchy as it was valued using unobservable inputs. Unobservable inputs reflect the Company’s best estimate of what hypothetical market participants would use to determine the value of acquired assets at the reporting date based on the best information available in the circumstances. When a determination is made to classify items within Level III of the fair value hierarchy, the evaluation is based upon the significance of the unobservable inputs to the overall fair value measurement. Due to the limitation of goodwill asset market values or pricing information, the determination of fair value of the goodwill asset is inherently more difficult. Goodwill is not amortized for financial reporting purposes but could be amortizable for tax purposes. The intangible assets that arose from these acquisitions were also within Level III of the fair value hierarchy as it was valued using unobservable inputs, primarily from utilizing the Multi-Period Excess Earnings Method (MPEEM) model, which is an income-based approach that allocates to goodwill any acquisition costs not specifically assigned to intangibles, fixed assets or working capital. Intangible assets acquired include covenants not to compete, supply contracts, customer relationships, trade names, licenses and databases and software with a useful life ranging from three to eight years.
These acquisitions did not result in a significant change in the Company’s consolidated results of operations individually or in the aggregate; therefore, pro forma financial information has not been presented. The operating results have been included in the Company’s consolidated results of operations and financial position since the acquisition dates.


17


ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including the information incorporated by reference herein, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the Securities Act), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act). All statements other than statements of historical facts are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “forecast,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-Q involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and situations that may cause our or our industry’s actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these statements. These forward-looking statements are made in reliance upon the safe harbor provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These factors include those listed in Part I, Item 1A. under the caption entitled “Risk Factors” in this Form 10-Q and those discussed elsewhere in this Form 10-Q. Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this Form 10-Q to “Copart,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our” refer to Copart, Inc. We encourage investors to review these factors carefully together with the other matters referred to herein, as well as in the other documents we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC). We may from time to time make additional written and oral forward-looking statements, including statements contained in our filings with the SEC. We do not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time by or on behalf of us.
Although we believe that, based on information currently available to us and our management, the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.
Overview
We are a leading provider of online auctions and vehicle remarketing services in the United States (U.S.), Canada, the United Kingdom (U.K.), Brazil, the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), Oman, Bahrain, and India. We also provide vehicle remarketing services in Germany and Spain.
We provide vehicle sellers with a full range of services to process and sell vehicles primarily over the Internet through our Virtual Bidding Third Generation Internet auction-style sales technology, which we refer to as VB3. Vehicle sellers consist primarily of insurance companies, but also include banks and financial institutions, charities, car dealerships, fleet operators and vehicle rental companies. We sell the vehicles principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters and, at certain locations, to the general public. The majority of the vehicles sold on behalf of insurance companies are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss or not economically repairable by the insurance companies, or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. We offer vehicle sellers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the vehicle sales process, minimize administrative and processing costs, and maximize the ultimate sales price.
In the U.S. and Canada (North America), Brazil, the U.A.E., Oman, Bahrain, and India, we sell vehicles primarily as an agent and derive revenue primarily from fees paid by vehicle sellers and vehicle buyers as well as related fees for services, such as towing and storage. In the U.K., we operate both on a principal basis, purchasing the salvage vehicles outright from the insurance companies and reselling the vehicles for our own account, and as an agent. In Germany and Spain, we derive revenue from sales listing fees for listing vehicles on behalf of many insurance companies.
We monitor and analyze a number of key financial performance indicators in order to manage our business and evaluate our financial and operating performance. Such indicators include:
Service and Vehicle Sales Revenue: Our revenue consists of sales transaction fees charged to vehicle sellers and vehicle buyers, transportation revenue, purchased vehicle revenue, and other remarketing services. Revenues from sellers are generally generated either on a fixed fee contract basis, where our fees are fixed based on the sale of each vehicle regardless of the selling price of the vehicle or under our Percentage Incentive Program (PIP), where our fees are generally based on a predetermined percentage of the vehicle sales price. Under the consignment or fixed fee program, we generally charge an additional fee for title processing and special preparation. We may also charge additional fees for the cost of transporting the vehicle to our facility, storage of the vehicle, and other incidental costs not included in the consignment fee. Under the consignment program, only the fees associated with vehicle processing are recorded in revenue, not the actual sales price (gross proceeds). Sales transaction fees also include fees charged to vehicle buyers for purchasing vehicles, storage, loading, and annual registration. Transportation revenue includes charges to sellers for towing vehicles under certain contracts and towing charges assessed to buyers for delivering vehicles. Purchased vehicle revenue includes the gross sales price of the vehicle, which we have purchased or are otherwise considered to own and is primarily generated in the U.K. We have certain contracts with insurance companies in which we act as a principal, purchasing vehicles and reselling them for our own account. We also purchase vehicles in the open market, primarily from individuals and resell them for our own account.

18


Our revenue is impacted by several factors, including salvage frequency and the average vehicle auction selling price, as over 50% of our service revenue is associated in some manner to the ultimate selling price of the vehicle. Vehicle auction selling prices are driven primarily by: (i) changes in commodity prices, particularly the per ton price for crushed car bodies, as we believe this has an impact on the ultimate selling price of vehicles sold for scrap and vehicles sold for dismantling; (ii) used car pricing, which we believe has an impact on salvage frequency; (iii) the mix of cars sold; and (iv) changes in the U.S. dollar exchange rate to foreign currencies, which we believe has an impact on auction participation by international buyers. We cannot determine the impact of the movement of these influences as we cannot determine which vehicles are sold to the end user or for scrap, dismantling, retailing or export. We also cannot predict the future movements of these influences. Accordingly, we cannot quantify the specific impact that commodity pricing, used car pricing, and product sales mix has on the selling price of vehicles and ultimately on service revenue. Salvage frequency is the percentage of cars involved in accidents which insurance companies salvage rather than repair and is driven by the relationship between repairs costs, used car values, and auction returns. Over the last several years, we believe there has been an increase in overall growth in the salvage market driven by an increase in salvage frequency. The increase in salvage frequency may have been driven by the decline in used car values relative to repair costs, which we believe are generally trending upward. Conversely, increases in used car prices, such as occurred during the most recent recession, may decrease salvage frequency and adversely affect our growth rate. Used car values are determined by many factors, including the used car supply, which is tied directly to new car sales, and the average age of cars on the road. New car sales grew on a year over year basis increasing the supply of used cars. Additionally, the average age of cars on the road continued to increase, growing from 9.6 years in 2002 to 11.5 years in 2015. Contrary to what movements in these factors would indicate, used car values have remained stable over the last twelve months. The factors that influence repair costs, used car pricing, and auction returns are many and varied and we cannot predict their movements. Accordingly, we cannot predict future trends in salvage frequency.
Operating Costs and Expenses: Yard operations expenses consist primarily of operating personnel (which includes yard management, clerical and yard employees), rent, contract vehicle towing, insurance, fuel, equipment maintenance and repair, and costs of vehicles sold under the purchase contracts. General and administrative expenses consist primarily of executive management, accounting, data processing, sales personnel, human resources, professional fees, research and development, and marketing expenses.
Other Income and Expense: Other income primarily includes income from the rental of certain real property, foreign exchange rate gains and losses, and gains and losses from the disposal of assets, which will fluctuate based on the nature of these activities each period. Other expense consists primarily of interest expense on long-term debt. See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 2 – Long-Term Debt .
Liquidity and Cash Flows: Our primary source of working capital is cash operating results and debt financing. The primary source of our liquidity is our cash and cash equivalents. The primary factors affecting cash operating results are: (i) seasonality; (ii) market wins and losses; (iii) supplier mix; (iv) accident frequency; (v) salvage frequency; (vi) increased volume from our existing suppliers; (vii) commodity pricing; (viii) used car pricing; (ix) foreign currency exchange rates; (x) product mix; and (xi) contract mix to the extent applicable. These factors are further discussed in the Results of Operations and Risk Factors sections of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
Potential internal sources of additional working capital are the sale of assets or the issuance of equity through option exercises and shares issued under our Employee Stock Purchase Plan. A potential external source of additional working capital is the issuance of debt and equity; however, we cannot predict if these sources will be available in the future and, if available, if they can be issued under terms commercially acceptable to us.
Results of Tender Offer
On December 30, 2015 , we completed a modified "Dutch Auction" tender offer, or tender offer, to purchase up to 7,317,073 shares of our common stock at a price not greater than $41.00 nor less than $38.00 per share. In connection with the tender offer, we accepted for payment an aggregate of 8,333,333 shares of common stock at a purchase price of $39.00 per share for a total value of $325.0 million . Our directors and executive officers did not participate in the tender offer. The shares repurchased as a result of the tender offer are not part of our stock repurchase program.
Acquisitions and New Operations
As part of our overall expansion strategy of offering integrated services to vehicle sellers, we anticipate acquiring and developing facilities in new regions, as well as the regions currently served by our facilities. We believe that these acquisitions and openings will strengthen our coverage, as we have facilities located in North America, the U.K., Brazil, the U.A.E., Oman, Bahrain, Germany, Spain and India, with the intention of providing national coverage for our sellers. All of our acquisitions have been accounted for using the purchase method of accounting.

19


The following table sets forth facilities that we have acquired or opened from August 1, 2014 through January 31, 2016 :
Locations
 
Acquisitions or
Greenfield
 
Date
 
Geographic Service Area
Manama, Bahrain
 
Greenfield
 
May 2015
 
Bahrain
Muscat, Oman
 
Greenfield
 
June 2015
 
Oman
Moncton, New Brunswick
 
Greenfield
 
July 2015
 
Canada
Sonepat, Haryana
 
Greenfield
 
October 2015
 
India
The period-to-period comparability of our consolidated operating results and financial position is affected by business acquisitions, new openings, weather and product introductions during such periods. In particular, we have certain contracts inherited through our U.K. acquisitions that require us to act as a principal, purchasing vehicles from the insurance companies and reselling them for our own account. It is our intention, where possible, to migrate these contracts to the agency model in future periods. Changes in the amount of revenue derived in a period from principal transactions relative to total revenue will impact revenue growth and margin percentages.
In addition to growth through business acquisitions, we seek to increase revenues and profitability by, among other things, (i) acquiring and developing additional vehicle storage facilities in key markets; (ii) pursuing national and regional vehicle seller agreements; (iii) increasing our service offerings to sellers and members; and (iv) expanding the application of VB3 into new markets. In addition, we implement our pricing structure and auction procedures, and attempt to introduce cost efficiencies at each of our acquired facilities by implementing our operational procedures, integrating our management information systems, and redeploying personnel, when necessary.
Results of Operations
The following table shows certain data from our consolidated statements of income expressed as a percentage of total service revenues and vehicle sales for the three and six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 :
 
 
Three Months Ended January 31,
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In percentages)
 
2016
 
2015
2016
 
2015
Service revenues and vehicle sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Service revenues
 
87
 %
 
86
 %
87
 %
 
86
 %
Vehicle sales
 
13
 %
 
14
 %
13
 %
 
14
 %
Total service revenues and vehicle sales
 
100
 %
 
100
 %
100
 %
 
100
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yard operations
 
47
 %
 
47
 %
47
 %
 
46
 %
Cost of vehicle sales
 
11
 %
 
12
 %
11
 %
 
12
 %
General and administrative
 
11
 %
 
12
 %
12
 %
 
13
 %
Total operating expenses
 
69
 %
 
71
 %
70
 %
 
71
 %
Operating income
 
31
 %
 
29
 %
30
 %
 
29
 %
Other (expense) income:
 
 %
 
 %
(1
)%
 
 %
Income before income taxes
 
31
 %
 
29
 %
29
 %
 
29
 %
Income taxes
 
11
 %
 
10
 %
11
 %
 
10
 %
Net income
 
20
 %
 
19
 %
19
 %
 
18
 %

20


Comparison of the Three and Six Months Ended January 31, 2016 and 2015
The following table presents a comparison of service revenues and vehicle sales for the three and six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 :
 
 
Three Months Ended January 31,
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
 
2016
 
2015
 
Change
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
Change
 
% Change
Service revenues
 
$
260,417

 
$
238,508

 
$
21,909

 
9.2
%
 
$
511,384

 
$
485,128

 
$
26,256

 
5.4
 %
Vehicle sales
 
39,289

 
37,750

 
1,539

 
4.1
%
 
77,160

 
81,516

 
(4,356
)
 
(5.3
)%
Total service revenues and vehicle sales
 
$
299,706

 
$
276,258

 
$
23,448

 
8.5
%
 
$
588,544

 
$
566,644

 
$
21,900

 
3.9
 %
Service Revenues. The increase in service revenues during the three months ended January 31, 2016 of $21.9 million , or 9.2% as compared to the same period last year came from (i) growth in North America of $19.6 million; and (ii) growth in the U.K. of $2.3 million. The growth in North America was driven primarily by increased volume, partially offset by a marginal decrease in revenue per car due to lower average auction selling prices, which we believe is due to lower commodity prices, the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against foreign currencies, and a change in mix of vehicles sold. The increase in volume in North America was derived largely from existing suppliers, driven by what we believe was increased salvage frequency. Excluding a detrimental impact of $1.3 million due to the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate, the growth in the U.K. of $3.6 million was driven primarily by increased volume as we increased our market share and a marginal increase in revenue per car. Excluding a detrimental impact of $1.1 million due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates, primarily from the change in the Brazilian real to U.S. dollar exchange rate, the growth in our other international markets was $1.1 million.
The increase in service revenues during the six months ended January 31, 2016 of $26.3 million , or 5.4% as compared to the same period last year came from (i) growth in North America of $24.5 million; and (ii) growth in the U.K. of $2.8 million; partially offset by (iii) a decline in our other international markets of $1.0 million. The growth in North America was driven primarily by increased volume, partially offset by a marginal decrease in revenue per car due to lower average auction selling prices, which we believe is due to lower commodity prices, the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against foreign currencies, and a change in mix of vehicles sold. The increase in volume in North America came from existing suppliers as we believe there may have been an increase in the overall growth in the salvage market driven by increased salvage frequency. Excluding a detrimental impact of $2.9 million due to the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate, the growth in the U.K. of $5.7 million was driven primarily by increased volume and secondarily by a marginal increase in revenue per car. Excluding a detrimental impact of $2.5 million due to changes in foreign currency exchange rates, primarily from the change in the Brazilian real to U.S. dollar exchange rate, the growth in our other international markets was $1.5 million.
Vehicle Sales. The increase in vehicle sales for the three months ended January 31, 2016 of $1.5 million , or 4.1% as compared to the same period last year came from (i) an increase in North America of $0.6 million; (ii) an increase in the U.K. of $0.3 million; and (iii) growth in our other international markets of $0.6 million. The increase in North America was driven primarily by increased volume, partially offset by a decrease in revenue per car due to lower average auction selling prices, which we believe is due to lower commodity prices and a change in mix of vehicles sold. The increase in the U.K. was primarily the result of increased volume, partially offset by a decrease in revenue per car due to lower average auction selling prices driven by increased open market purchase activity from the general public and included a $1.1 million detrimental impact due to the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate. The growth in our other international markets was driven primarily by increased volume.
The decrease in vehicle sales for the six months ended January 31, 2016 of $4.4 million , or 5.3% as compared to the same period last year came from (i) a decline in the U.K. of $4.9 million; and (ii) a decline in North America of $0.3 million; partially offset by (iii) growth in our other international markets of $0.8 million. The decline in the U.K. was primarily the result of lower average auction selling prices driven by decreased insurance volume and increased open market purchase activity from the general public and included a $2.6 million detrimental impact due to the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate. The decline in North America was primarily the result of lower average auction selling prices, which we believe is due to lower commodity prices and a change in mix of vehicles sold. The growth in our other international markets was driven primarily by increased volume.


21


The following table summarizes operating expenses, total other expenses and income taxes for the three and six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 :
 
Three Months Ended January 31,
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
2016
 
2015
 
Change
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
Change
 
% Change
Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yard operations
$
132,717

 
$
120,730

 
$
11,987

 
9.9
 %
 
$
260,281

 
$
242,875

 
$
17,406

 
7.2
 %
 Yard depreciation and amortization
8,248

 
8,543

 
(295
)
 
(3.5
)%
 
16,593

 
17,403

 
(810
)
 
(4.7
)%
 Total yard operations expense
140,965

 
129,273

 
11,692

 
9.0
 %
 
276,874

 
260,278

 
16,596

 
6.4
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of vehicle sales
34,127

 
32,118

 
2,009

 
6.3
 %
 
66,195

 
69,191

 
(2,996
)
 
(4.3
)%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
General and administrative
29,086

 
31,542

 
(2,456
)
 
(7.8
)%
 
60,525

 
68,579

 
(8,054
)
 
(11.7
)%
General and administrative depreciation and amortization
3,443

 
2,857

 
586

 
20.5
 %
 
6,619

 
5,727

 
892

 
15.6
 %
Total general and administrative
32,529

 
34,399

 
(1,870
)
 
(5.4
)%
 
67,144

 
74,306

 
(7,162
)
 
(9.6
)%
Total operating expenses
$
207,621

 
$
195,790

 
$
11,831

 
6.0
 %
 
$
410,213

 
$
403,775

 
$
6,438

 
1.6
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total other expenses
$
(533
)
 
$
(364
)
 
$
(169
)
 
46.4
 %
 
$
(5,019
)
 
$
(542
)
 
$
(4,477
)
 
826.0
 %
Income taxes
32,589

 
27,911

 
4,678

 
16.8
 %
 
61,936

 
57,519

 
4,417

 
7.7
 %
Yard Operations Expense. The increase in yard operations expense for the three months ended January 31, 2016 of $11.7 million , or 9.0% as compared to the same period last year came primarily from (i) growth in North America of $10.5 million; (ii) growth in the U.K. of $1.1 million; and (ii) an increase in our other international markets of $0.1 million. The growth in North America was driven primarily by increased volume, partially offset by a marginal decrease in the cost to process each car. Excluding the beneficial impact of $0.7 million due to the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate, the growth in the U.K. was driven by increased volume and a marginal increase in the cost to process each car. The decrease in yard depreciation and amortization expenses for the three months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period last year resulted primarily from certain assets becoming fully amortized in North America.
The increase in yard operations expense for the six months ended January 31, 2016 of $16.6 million , or 6.4% as compared to the same period last year came primarily from (i) growth in North America of $15.7 million; (ii) growth in in the U.K. of $0.8 million; and (iii) growth in our other international markets of $0.1 million. The growth in North America was driven primarily by increased volume, partially offset by a marginal decrease in the cost to process each car. Excluding the beneficial impact of $1.8 million due to the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate, the growth in the U.K. was driven by increased volume. The decrease in yard depreciation and amortization expenses for the six months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period last year resulted primarily from certain assets becoming fully amortized in North America.
Cost of Vehicle Sales. The increase in cost of vehicle sales for the three months ended January 31, 2016 of $2.0 million , or 6.3% as compared to the same period last year came primarily from (i) an increase in the U.K. of $0.8 million, which included the beneficial impact of the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate of $0.9 million; (ii) an increase in North America of $0.7 million; and (iii) an increase in our other international markets of $0.5 million. The increase in the U.K. resulted from increased volume, partially offset by lower average purchase prices, driven by increased open market purchase activity from the general public. The increase in North America resulted from increased volume, partially offset by lower average purchase prices, which we believe is due to lower commodity prices and a change in mix of vehicles sold. The growth in our other international markets was driven primarily by increased volume.
The decrease in cost of vehicle sales for the six months ended January 31, 2016 of $3.0 million , or 4.3% as compared to the same period last year came primarily from (i) a decline in the U.K. of $4.0 million, which included the beneficial impact of the change in the British pound to U.S. dollar exchange rate of $2.0 million; partially offset by (ii) an increase in North America of $0.3 million; and (iii) an increase in our other international markets of $0.7 million. The decline in the U.K. resulted from lower average purchase prices, driven by decreased insurance volume and increased open market purchase activity from the general public, partially offset by increased volume. The increase in North America resulted from increased volume, partially offset by lower average purchase prices, which we believe is due to lower commodity prices and a change in mix of vehicles sold. The growth in our other international markets was driven primarily by increased volume.

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General and Administrative Expenses. The decrease in general and administrative expenses for the three months ended January 31, 2016 of $1.9 million , or 5.4% as compared to the same period last year came primarily from (i) a decrease in North America of $2.6 million as a result of decreased expenditures on technology development; partially offset by (ii) an increase in stock-based payment compensation. The increase in depreciation and amortization expenses for the three months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period last year resulted primarily from depreciating certain technology assets placed into service in North America.
The decrease in general and administrative expenses for the six months ended January 31, 2016 of $7.2 million , or 9.6% as compared to the same period last year came primarily from (i) a decrease in North America of $7.7 million as a result of decreased expenditures on technology development; partially offset by (ii) an increase in stock-based payment compensation. The increase in depreciation and amortization expenses for the six months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period last year resulted primarily from depreciating certain technology assets placed into service in North America.
Other (Expense) Income. The increase in total other expenses for the three months ended January 31, 2016 of $0.2 million , or 46.4% as compared to the same period last year was primarily due to an increase in interest expense of $0.9 million as a result of the additional long-term debt issued in December 2014, partially offset by increased currency gains in the U.K. of $0.9 million. See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 2 – Long-Term Debt .
The increase in total other expenses for the six months ended January 31, 2016 of $4.5 million as compared to the same period last year was primarily due to an increase in interest expense of $4.7 million as a result of the additional long-term debt issued in December 2014, partially offset by increased currency gains in the U.K. of $0.6 million. See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 2 – Long-Term Debt .
Income Taxes. Our effective income tax rates were 35.6% and 34.8% for the three months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively, and 35.7% and 35.4% for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
The following table presents a comparison of key components of our liquidity and capital resources at January 31, 2016 and July 31, 2015 and for the six months ended January 31, 2016 and 2015 , respectively:
(In thousands)
January 31, 2016
 
July 31, 2015
 
Change
 
% Change
Cash and cash equivalents
$
141,416

 
$
456,012

 
$
(314,596
)
 
(69.0
)%
Marketable securities
17,465

 

 
17,465

 
100.0
 %
Working capital
241,741

 
521,456

 
(279,715
)
 
(53.6
)%
 
Six Months Ended January 31,
(In thousands)
2016
 
2015
 
Change
 
% Change
Operating cash flows
$
83,080

 
$
88,883

 
$
(5,803
)
 
-6.5
 %
Investing cash flows
(98,486
)
 
(38,717
)
 
(59,769
)
 
154.4
 %
Financing cash flows
(291,675
)
 
388,695

 
(680,370
)
 
-175.0
 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
$
(77,763
)
 
$
(39,459
)
 
$
(38,304
)
 
97.1
 %
Proceeds from revolving loan facility, net of repayments
68,000

 

 
68,000

 
100.0
 %
Principal payments on long-term debt
(37,500
)
 
(312,500
)
 
275,000

 
-88.0
 %
Cash and cash equivalents and working capital decreased at January 31, 2016 as compared to July 31, 2015 primarily due to repurchases of common stock as part of our tender offer, capital expenditures and payments on long-term debt, partially offset by cash generated from operations and proceeds from our revolving loan facility. Cash equivalents consisted of bank deposits, domestic certificates of deposit, and funds invested in money market accounts, which bear interest at variable rates. Marketable securities increased at January 31, 2016 as compared to July 31, 2015 due to the purchase of marketable equity securities.
Historically, we have financed our growth through cash generated from operations, public offerings of common stock, equity issued in conjunction with certain acquisitions and debt financing. Our primary source of cash generated by operations is from the collection of sellers' fees, members' fees and reimbursable advances from the proceeds of vehicle sales. Our business is seasonal as inclement weather during the winter months increases the frequency of accidents and consequently, the number of cars involved in accidents which the insurance companies salvage rather than repair. During the winter months, most of our facilities process 10% to 30% more vehicles than at other times of the year. This increased volume requires the increased use of our cash to pay out advances and handling costs of the additional business.

23


We believe that our currently available cash and cash equivalents and cash generated from operations will be sufficient to satisfy our operating and working capital requirements for at least the next 12 months. We expect to acquire additional locations and expand some our current facilities in the foreseeable future. We may be required to raise additional cash through the issuance of new debt or additional equity to fund this expansion. Although the timing and magnitude of growth through expansion and acquisitions are not predictable, the opening of new greenfield yards is contingent upon our ability to locate property that (i) is in an area in which we have a need for more capacity; (ii) has adequate size given the capacity needs; (iii) has the appropriate shape and topography for our operations; (iv) is reasonably close to a major road or highway; and (v) most importantly, has the appropriate zoning for our business. Costs to develop a new yard can range from $1.0 to $30.0 million, depending on size, location and developmental infrastructure requirements.
As of January 31, 2016 , $100.4 million of the $141.4 million of cash and cash equivalents was held by our foreign subsidiaries. If these funds are needed for our operations in the U.S., we would be required to accrue and pay U.S. taxes to repatriate these funds. However, our intent is to permanently reinvest these funds outside of the U.S. and our current plans do not demonstrate a need to repatriate them to fund our U.S. operations.
Net cash provided by operating activities decreased for the six months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period in 2015 due to changes in operating assets and liabilities, partially offset by improved cash operating results from an increase in service revenues and a decrease in general and administrative expenses. The change in operating assets and liabilities was primarily the result of an increase in accounts receivable of $27.8 million, partially offset by an increase in accounts payable of $7.9 million and an increase in income taxes payable of $7.8 million.
Net cash used in investing activities increased for the six months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period in 2015 due primarily to an increase in capital expenditures and purchases of marketable securities. Our capital expenditures are primarily related to lease buyouts of certain facilities, acquiring land, opening and improving facilities, software development, and acquiring yard equipment. We continue to expand and invest in new and existing facilities and standardize the appearance of existing locations.
Net cash used in financing activities increased for the six months ended January 31, 2016 as compared to the same period in 2015 due primarily to an increase in repurchases of common stock as part of our tender offer, a decrease in the issuance of long-term debt and a decrease in proceeds from the exercise of stock options, partially offset by the proceeds from our revolving loan facility and decreased payments on long-term debt. See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 2 – Long-Term Debt and Note 8 – Common Stock Repurchases and under the subheadings " Credit Agreement " and " Note Purchase Agreement " .
Credit Facility
On December 14, 2010, we entered into an Amended and Restated Credit Facility Agreement (Credit Facility), with Bank of America, N.A. The Credit Facility was an unsecured credit agreement providing for (i) a $100.0 million revolving credit facility, including a $100.0 million alternative currency borrowing sublimit and a $50.0 million letter of credit sublimit and (ii) a term loan facility of $400.0 million. On September, 29, 2011, we amended the Credit Facility increasing the amount of the term loan facility from $400.0 million to $500.0 million.
Credit Agreement
On December 3, 2014, we entered into a Credit Agreement with Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as administrative agent, and Bank of America, N.A., as syndication agent, which superseded the Credit Facility. The Credit Agreement provides for (a) a secured revolving loan facility in an aggregate principal amount of up to $300.0 million , none of which was outstanding at July 31, 2015 and $68.0 million was outstanding at January 31, 2016 (Revolving Loan Facility), and (b) a secured term loan facility in an aggregate principal amount of $300.0 million (Term Loan), which was fully drawn at closing. Proceeds from the Credit Agreement were used to repay all outstanding amounts under the Credit Facility totaling $275.0 million at December 3, 2014. The remaining proceeds are being used for general corporate purposes. The Revolving Loan Facility and the Term Loan facility mature on December 3, 2019.
The Term Loan, which as of January 31, 2016 , had $206.3 million outstanding, amortized $18.8 million million each quarter during December 31, 2014 through December 31, 2015, then amortizes $7.5 million each quarter, with all outstanding borrowings due on December 3, 2019. All amounts borrowed under the Term Loan may be prepaid without premium or penalty.
The Revolving Loan Facility and Term Loan under the Credit Agreement bear interest, at our election, at either (a) the Base Rate, which is defined as a fluctuating rate per annum equal to the greatest of (i) the Prime Rate in effect on such day; (ii) the Federal Funds Rate in effect on such date plus 0.50% ; or (iii) an adjusted LIBOR rate determined on the basis of a one-month interest period plus 1.0% , in each case plus an applicable margin ranging from 0.25% to 1.0% based on our consolidated total net leverage ratio during the preceding fiscal quarter; or (b) an adjusted LIBOR rate plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.25% to 2.0% depending on our consolidated total net leverage ratio during the preceding fiscal quarter. Interest is due and payable quarterly, in arrears, for loans bearing interest at the Base Rate, and at the end of an interest period (or at each three month interval in the case of loans with interest periods greater than three months) in the case of loans bearing interest at the adjusted LIBOR rate. The interest rate as of January 31, 2016 on our variable interest rate debt was the one month LIBOR rate of 0.43% plus an applicable margin of 1.25%. The carrying amount of the Credit Agreement is comprised of borrowings under which interest accrues under a fluctuating interest rate structure. Accordingly, the carrying value approximates fair value at January 31, 2016 , and was classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy.

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Amounts borrowed under the Revolving Loan Facility may be repaid and reborrowed until the maturity date of December 3, 2019. We are obligated to pay a commitment fee on the unused portion of the Revolving Loan Facility. The commitment fee rate ranges from 0.20% to 0.35% , depending on our consolidated total net leverage ratio during the preceding fiscal quarter, on the average daily unused portion of the revolving credit commitment under the Credit Agreement. We had $68.0 million of outstanding borrowings under the Revolving Loan Facility as of January 31, 2016 and none were outstanding as of July 31, 2015 .
Our obligations under the Credit Agreement are guaranteed by certain of our domestic subsidiaries meeting materiality thresholds set forth in the Credit Agreement. Such obligations, including the guaranties, are secured by substantially all of our assets and the assets of the subsidiary guarantors pursuant to a Security Agreement, dated December 3, 2014, among us, the subsidiary guarantors from time to time party thereto, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as collateral agent.
The Credit Agreement contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including covenants that limit or restrict us and our subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things, incur indebtedness, grant liens, merge or consolidate, dispose of assets, make investments, make acquisitions, enter into transactions with affiliates, pay dividends, or make distributions on and repurchase stock, in each case subject to certain exceptions. We are also required to maintain compliance, measured at the end of each fiscal quarter, with a consolidated total net leverage ratio and a consolidated interest coverage ratio. We were in compliance with all covenants related to the Credit Agreement as of January 31, 2016 .
Note Purchase Agreement
On December 3, 2014, we entered into a Note Purchase Agreement and sold to certain purchasers (collectively, the Purchasers) $400.0 million in aggregate principal amount of senior secured notes (Senior Notes) consisting of (i) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.07% Senior Notes, Series A, due December 3, 2024 ; (ii) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.19% Senior Notes, Series B, due December 3, 2026 ; (iii) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.25% Senior Notes, Series C, due December 3, 2027 ; and (iv) $100.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.35% Senior Notes, Series D, due December 3, 2029 . Interest is due and payable quarterly, in arrears, on each of the Senior Notes. Proceeds from the Note Purchase Agreement are being used for general corporate purposes.
We may prepay the Senior Notes, in whole or in part, at any time, subject to certain conditions, including minimum amounts and payment of a make-whole amount equal to the discounted value of the remaining scheduled interest payments under the Senior Notes.
Our obligations under the Note Purchase Agreement are guaranteed by certain of our domestic subsidiaries meeting materiality thresholds set forth in the Note Purchase Agreement. Such obligations, including the guaranties, are secured by substantially all of our assets and the assets of the subsidiary guarantors. Our obligations and our subsidiary guarantors under the Note Purchase Agreement will be treated on a pari passu basis with the obligations of those entities under the Credit Agreement as well as any additional debt that we may obtain.
The Note Purchase Agreement contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including covenants that limit or restrict us and our subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things, incur indebtedness, grant liens, merge or consolidate, dispose of assets, make investments, make acquisitions, enter into transactions with affiliates, pay dividends, or make distributions and repurchase stock, in each case subject to certain exceptions. We are also required to maintain compliance, measured at the end of each fiscal quarter, with a consolidated total net leverage ratio and a consolidated interest coverage ratio. We are in compliance with all covenants related to the Note Purchase Agreement as of January 31, 2016 .
Related to the execution of the Credit Agreement and the Note Purchase Agreement, we incurred $2.1 million in costs, of which $1.0 million was capitalized as debt issuance fees and $1.1 million was recorded as a reduction of the long-term debt proceeds as a debt discount. Both the debt issuance fees and debt discount are amortized to interest expense over the term of the respective debt instruments.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
The preparation of consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including costs related to vehicle pooling, self-insured reserves, allowance for doubtful accounts, income taxes, revenue recognition, stock-based payment compensation, purchase price allocations, long-lived asset impairment calculations and contingencies. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
Management has discussed the selection of critical accounting policies and estimates with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and the Audit Committee has reviewed our disclosure relating to critical accounting policies and estimates in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. There have been no significant changes to the critical accounting policies and estimates from what was disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2015 filed with the SEC on September 25, 2015. Our significant accounting policies are described in the Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 1 – Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

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Recently Issued Accounting Standards
For a description of the new accounting standards that affect us, refer to the Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 10 – Recent Accounting Pronouncements .
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
As of January 31, 2016 , there are no off-balance sheet arrangements pursuant to Item 303(a)(4) of Regulation S-K promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
There have been no significant changes to the information required under this Item from what was disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2015 filed with the SEC on September 25, 2015.
ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
(a)   Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
We conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act), or Disclosure Controls, as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. This evaluation, or Controls Evaluation, was performed under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and our Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Disclosure Controls are controls and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act, such as this Quarterly Report, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure Controls include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our CEO and CFO, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our Disclosure Controls include some, but not all, components of our internal control over financial reporting.
Based upon the Controls Evaluation, our CEO and CFO have concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, our Disclosure Controls were effective to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is accumulated and communicated to management, including the CEO and CFO, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure, and that such information is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
 (b)   Changes in Internal Controls
There have not been any changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

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PART II — OTHER INFORMATION
ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are subject to threats of litigation and are involved in actual litigation and damage claims arising in the ordinary course of business, such as actions related to injuries, property damage, and handling or disposal of vehicles. The material pending legal proceedings to which we are party, or of which our property is subject, include the following matters. 
On November 1, 2013, we filed suit against Sparta Consulting, Inc. (now known as KPIT) in the 44th Judicial District Court of Dallas County, Texas, alleging fraud, fraudulent inducement, and/or promissory fraud, negligent misrepresentation, unfair business practices pursuant to California Business and Professions Code § 17200, breach of contract, declaratory judgment, and attorney’s fees. We seek compensatory and exemplary damages, disgorgement of amounts paid, attorney’s fees, pre- and post-judgment interest, costs of suit, and a judicial declaration of the parties’ rights, duties, and obligations under the Implementation Services Agreement dated October 6, 2011. The suit arises out of our September 17, 2013 decision to terminate the Implementation Services Agreement, under which KPIT was to design, implement, and deliver a customized replacement enterprise resource planning system for us. On January 2, 2014, KPIT removed this suit to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas. On August 11, 2014, the Northern District of Texas transferred the suit to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California for convenience. On January 8, 2014, KPIT filed suit against us in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of California, alleging breach of contract, promissory estoppel, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, account stated, quantum meruit, unjust enrichment, and declaratory relief. KPIT seeks compensatory and exemplary damages, prejudgment interest, costs of suit, and a judicial declaration of the parties’ rights, duties, and obligations under the Implementation Services Agreement. We are pursuing our claim for damages, and defending KPIT’s claim for damages.
We have provided for costs relating to these matters when a loss is probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. The effect of the outcome of these matters on our future consolidated results of operations and cash flows cannot be predicted because any such effect depends on future results of operations and the amount and timing of the resolution of such matters. We believe that any ultimate liability will not have a material effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows. However, the amount of the liabilities associated with these claims, if any, cannot be determined with certainty. We maintain insurance which may or may not provide coverage for claims made against us. There is no assurance that there will be insurance coverage available when and if needed. Additionally, the insurance that we carry requires that we pay for costs and/or claims exposure up to the amount of the insurance deductibles negotiated when the insurance is purchased.
Governmental Proceedings
The Georgia Department of Revenue, or DOR, has conducted a sales and use tax audit of our operations in Georgia for the period from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011. As a result of their initial audit, the DOR issued a notice of proposed assessment for uncollected sales taxes in which it asserted that we failed to collect and remit sales taxes totaling $73.8 million , including penalties and interest. According to the DOR, the proposed assessment was based on its initial determination that our sales did not constitute nontaxable sales for resale.
Subsequently, we engaged a Georgia law firm and outside tax advisors to review the conduct of our business operations in Georgia, the notice of proposed assessment, and the DOR’s policy position. In particular, our outside legal counsel provided us with an opinion that the sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax. In rendering its opinion, our counsel noted that non-U.S. registered resellers are unable to comply strictly with technical requirements for a Georgia certificate of exemption but concluded that our sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax notwithstanding this technical inability to comply.
Since our receipt of the notice of proposed assessment, our counsel and we have engaged in active discussions with the DOR to resolve the matter. On June 5, 2015 , following our discussions and after additional review of documentation, the DOR provided us with revised audit work papers computing a sales tax liability of $2.7 million before interest and any penalties.
On June 22, 2015 , representatives of the DOR and the Office of the Attorney General for the State of Georgia informed our counsel that the DOR intended to issue a formal notice of assessment for an estimated $100.0 million , based on the DOR’s original proposed assessment of $73.8 million plus additional accumulated interest and penalties. On August 4, 2015 , the DOR issued an official Assessment and Demand for Payment for $96.1 million for sales taxes, penalties, and interest that the DOR alleges we owe the State of Georgia. We filed an appeal of this notice of assessment from the DOR with the Georgia Tax Tribunal on September 3, 2015.


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Based on the opinion from our outside law firm, advice from our outside tax advisors, and our best estimate of a probable outcome, we believe that we have adequately provided for the payment of any assessment in our consolidated financial statements. We believe we have strong defenses to the DOR’s notice of assessment and intend to defend this matter. There can be no assurance that this matter will be resolved in our favor or that we will not ultimately be required to make a substantial payment to the Georgia DOR. We understand that litigating and defending the matter in Georgia could be expensive and time-consuming and result in substantial management distraction. If the matter were to be resolved in a manner adverse to us, it could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
Set forth below and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in other documents we file with the SEC are descriptions of the risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results contemplated by the forward-looking statements contained in this report. The descriptions below include any material changes to and supersede the description of the risk factors affecting our business previously disclosed in “Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2015 .
We depend on a limited number of major vehicle sellers for a substantial portion of our revenues. The loss of one or more of these major sellers could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position, and an inability to increase our sources of vehicle supply could adversely affect our growth rates.
No single customer accounted for more than 10% of our revenue during the six months ended January 31, 2016 . Historically, a limited number of vehicle sellers have collectively accounted for a substantial portion of our revenues. Seller arrangements are either written or oral agreements typically subject to cancellation by either party upon 30 to 90 days’ notice. Vehicle sellers have terminated agreements with us in the past in particular markets, which has affected the pricing for sales services in those markets. There can be no assurance that our existing agreements will not be canceled. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into future agreements with vehicle sellers or that we will be able to retain our existing supply of salvage vehicles. A reduction in vehicles from a significant vehicle seller or any material changes in the terms of an arrangement with a significant vehicle seller could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position. In addition, a failure to increase our sources of vehicle supply could adversely affect our earnings and revenue growth rates.
Our expansion into markets outside North America, including recent expansions in Europe, Brazil, the Middle East, and India expose us to risks arising from operating in international markets. Any failure to successfully integrate businesses acquired outside of North America into our operations could have an adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.
We first expanded our operations outside North America in fiscal 2008 with a significant acquisition in the U.K. followed by acquisitions in the U.A.E., Brazil, Germany, and Spain in fiscal 2013, expansions into Bahrain and Oman in fiscal 2015, and expansion into India in fiscal 2016. In addition, we continue to evaluate acquisitions and other opportunities outside North America. Acquisitions or other strategies to expand our operations outside North America pose substantial risks and uncertainties that could have an adverse effect on our future operating results. In particular, we may not be successful in realizing anticipated synergies from these acquisitions, or we may experience unanticipated costs or expenses integrating the acquired operations into our existing business. We have and may continue to incur substantial expenses establishing new yards or operations in international markets. Among other things, we will ultimately deploy our proprietary auction technologies at all of our foreign operations and we cannot predict whether this deployment will be successful or will result in increases in the revenues or operating efficiencies of any acquired companies relative to their historic operating performance. Integration of our respective operations, including information technology and financial and administrative functions, may not proceed as anticipated and could result in unanticipated costs or expenses such as capital expenditures that could have an adverse effect on our future operating results. We cannot provide any assurance that we will achieve our business and financial objectives in connection with these acquisitions or our strategic decision to expand our operations internationally.
As we continue to expand our business internationally, we will need to develop policies and procedures to manage our business on a global scale. Operationally, acquired businesses typically depend on key seller relationships, and our failure to maintain those relationships would have an adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and could have an adverse effect on our future operating results.
In addition, we anticipate our international operations will continue to subject us to a variety of risks associated with operating on an international basis, including:
the difficulty of managing and staffing foreign offices and the increased travel, infrastructure and legal compliance costs associated with multiple international locations;
the need to localize our product offerings, particularly the need to implement our online auction platform in foreign countries;
the need to comply with complex foreign and U.S. laws and regulations that apply to our international operations;

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tariffs and trade barriers and other regulatory or contractual limitations on our ability to operate in certain foreign markets;
exposure to foreign currency exchange rate risk, which may have an adverse impact on our revenues and revenue growth rates;
adapting to different business cultures and market structures, particularly where we seek to implement our auction model in markets where insurers have historically not played a substantial role in the disposition of salvage vehicles; and
•    repatriation of funds currently held in foreign jurisdictions to the U.S. may result in higher effective tax rates.
As we continue to expand our business globally, our success will depend, in large part, on our ability to anticipate and effectively manage these and other risks associated with our international operations. Our failure to manage any of these risks successfully could harm our international operations and have an adverse effect on our operating results.
In addition, certain acquisitions in the U.K. may be reviewed by the Competition and Markets Authority (U.K. Regulator). If an inquiry is made by the U.K. Regulator, we may be required to demonstrate that our acquisitions will not result, or be expected to result, in a substantial lessening of competition in the U.K. market. Although we believe that there will not be a substantial lessening of competition in the U.K. market, based on our analysis of the relevant U.K. markets, there can be no assurance that the U.K. Regulator will agree with us if it decides to make an inquiry. If the U.K. Regulator determines that by our acquisitions of certain assets, there is or likely will be a substantial lessening of competition in the U.K. market, we could be required to divest some portion of our U.K. assets. In the event of a divestiture order by the U.K. Regulator, the assets disposed may be sold for substantially less than their carrying value. Accordingly, any divestiture could have a material adverse effect on our operating results in the period of the divestiture.
Our operations and acquisitions in certain foreign areas expose us to political, regulatory, economic, and reputational risks.
Although we have implemented policies, procedures and training designed to ensure compliance with anti-bribery laws, trade controls and economic sanctions, and similar regulations, our employees or agents may take actions in violation of our policies. We may incur costs or other penalties in the event that any such violations occur, which could have an adverse effect on our business and reputation.
In addition, some of our recent acquisitions have required us to integrate non-U.S. companies which had not, until our acquisition, been subject to U.S. law. In many countries outside of the United States, particularly in those with developing economies, it may be common for persons to engage in business practices prohibited by laws and regulations applicable to us, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), U.K. Bribery Act, Brazil Clean Companies Act or similar local anti-bribery laws. These laws generally prohibit companies and their employees or agents from making improper payments to government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Failure by us and our subsidiaries to comply with these laws could subject us to civil and criminal penalties that could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated operating results and financial position.
We face risks associated with the implementation of our salvage auction model in markets that may not operate on the same terms as the North American market. For example, certain markets operate on a principal rather than agent basis, which may have an adverse impact on our gross margin percentages and expose us to inventory risks that we do not experience in North America.
Some of our target markets outside North America operate in a manner substantially different than our historic market in North America. For example, new markets may operate either wholly or partially on the principal model, in which the vehicle is purchased then resold for our own account, rather than the agency model employed in North America, in which we act as a sales agent for the legal owner of vehicles. Further, operating on a principal basis exposes us to inventory risks, including losses from theft, damage, and obsolescence. In addition, our business in North America and the U.K. has been established and grown based largely on our ability to build relationships with insurance carriers. In other markets, insurers have traditionally been less involved in the disposition of salvage vehicles. As we expand into markets outside North America and the U.K., we cannot predict whether markets will readily adapt to our strategy of online auctions of automobiles sourced principally through vehicle insurers. Any failure of new markets to adopt our business model could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
In general, acquisitions increase our sales and profitability although, given the typical size of our acquisitions, most acquisitions will not individually have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and financial position. We may not always be able to introduce our processes and selling platform to acquired companies due to different operating models in international jurisdictions or other facts. As a result, the associated benefits of acquisitions may be delayed for years in some international situations. During this period, the acquisitions may operate at a loss and certain acquisitions, while profitable, may operate at a margin percentage that is below our overall operating margin percentage and, accordingly, have an adverse impact on our consolidated results of operations and financial position. Hence, the conversion periods vary from weeks to years and cannot be predicted.

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We are transitioning various functionality of our third-party enterprise operating system to an internally developed proprietary system, and we may experience difficulties operating our business as we work to develop and design this system.
During fiscal 2014, we terminated a contract with KPIT (formerly known as Sparta Consulting, Inc.), whereby KPIT was engaged to design and implement an SAP-based replacement for our existing business operating software that, among other things, would address our international expansion needs. Following a review of KPIT’s work performed to date, and an assessment of the cost to complete, deployment risk, and other factors, we ceased development of KPIT’s software and are now pursuing an internally developed proprietary solution in its place. The transition of our enterprise operating system carries certain risks, including the risk of significant design or deployment errors causing disruptions, delays or deficiencies, which may make our website and services unavailable. This type of interruption could prevent us from processing vehicles for our sellers and may prevent us from selling vehicles through our Internet bidding platform, VB3, which would adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position. In addition, the transition to our new internally developed proprietary system will require us to commit substantial financial, operational and technical resources before the volume of business increases, without assurance that the volume of business will increase. We began using our new internally developed proprietary system with our expansion into India in fiscal 2016.
We may also implement additional or enhanced information systems in the future to accommodate our growth and to provide additional capabilities and functionality. The implementation of new systems and enhancements is frequently disruptive to the underlying business of an enterprise and can be time-consuming and expensive, increase management responsibilities and divert management attention. Any disruptions relating to our system enhancements or any problems with the implementation, particularly any disruptions impacting our operations or our ability to accurately report our financial performance on a timely basis during the implementation period, could materially and adversely affect our business. Even if we do not encounter these material and adverse effects, the implementation of these enhancements may be much more costly than we anticipated. If we are unable to successfully implement the information systems enhancements as planned, our financial position, results of operations and cash flows could be negatively impacted.
Our success depends on maintaining the integrity of our systems and infrastructure. As our operations continue to grow in both size and scope, domestically and internationally, we must continue to provide reliable, real-time access to our systems by our customers through improving and upgrading our systems and infrastructure for enhanced products, services, features and functionality. Any failure to maintain the integrity of our systems and infrastructure may result in loss of customers due to among other things, slow delivery times, unreliable service levels or insufficient capacity, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated financial position and results of operations.
The impairment of capitalized development costs could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
We capitalize certain costs associated with the development of new software products, new software for internal use and major software enhancements to existing software. These costs are amortized over the estimated useful life of the software beginning with its introduction or roll-out. If, at any time, it is determined that capitalized software provides a reduced economic benefit, the unamortized portion of the capitalized development costs will be expensed, in part or in full, as an impairment, which may have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and financial position. During fiscal 2014, we recognized a $29.1 million impairment charge primarily related to capitalized software development costs, as we ceased development of a third-party enterprise operating system and decided to address our international technology needs through an internally developed proprietary solution.
Any failure to maintain security and prevent unauthorized access to electronic and other confidential information could disrupt our business and materially and adversely affect our reputation, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
Information security risks for online commerce companies have significantly increased in recent years because of, in addition to other factors, the proliferation of new technologies, the use of the Internet and telecommunications technologies to conduct financial transactions, and the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime, hackers, terrorists, and other external parties. These threats may derive from fraud or malice on the part of third parties or current or former employees. In addition, human error or accidental technological failure could make us vulnerable to cyber-attacks, including the introduction of malicious computer viruses or code into our system, phishing attacks, or other information technology data security incidents.
Our operations rely on the secure processing, transmission and storage of confidential, proprietary and other information in our computer systems and networks. Our customers and other parties in the payments value chain rely on our digital technologies, computer and e-mail systems, software and networks to conduct their operations. In addition, to access our products and services, our customers and cardholders increasingly use personal smartphones, tablet PCs and other mobile devices that may be beyond our control.
Cyber-attacks or other cyber security incidents could materially and adversely affect our reputation, operating results, or financial condition by, among other things, making our auction platform inoperable for a period of time, damaging our reputation with buyers, sellers, and insurance companies as a result of the unauthorized disclosure of confidential information (including account data information), or resulting in governmental investigations, litigation, liability, fines, or penalties against us. If such attacks are not detected immediately, their effect could be compounded. While we maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions, cover certain aspects of these cyber risks, our insurance coverage may be insufficient to cover all losses and would not remedy damage to our reputation.

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We have in the past identified attempts by unauthorized third parties to access our systems and disrupt our online auctions. These attempts have caused minor service interruptions, which were promptly addressed and resolved, and our online service was restored to normal business. In April 2015, we identified that unauthorized third parties had gained access to data provided to us by our members that is considered to be personal information in certain jurisdictions. We immediately investigated, including the engagement of an external expert security firm, and made the required notifications to members whose information may have been accessed and to regulatory agencies.
We are constantly evaluating and implementing new technologies and processes to manage risks relating to cyber-attacks and system and network disruptions, including but not limited to usage errors by our employees, power outages and catastrophic events such as fires, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes and earthquakes. We have further enhanced our security protocols based on the investigation we conducted in response to the data security incident. Nevertheless, we cannot provide assurances that our efforts to address prior data security incidents and mitigate against the risk of future data security incidents or system failures will be successful. The techniques used by criminals to obtain unauthorized access to sensitive data change frequently and are often not recognized immediately. We may be unable to anticipate these techniques or implement adequate preventative measures and believe that cyber-attacks and threats against us have occurred in the past and are likely to continue in the future. If our systems are compromised again in the future, become inoperable for extended periods of time, or cease to function properly, we may have to make a significant investment to fix or replace them, and our ability to provide many of our electronic and online solutions to our customers may be impaired. In addition, as cyber-threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend significant additional resources to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate any information security vulnerabilities. Any of the risks described above could materially and adversely affect our consolidated financial position and results of operations.
Our business is exposed to risks associated with online commerce security and credit card fraud.
Consumer concerns over the security of transactions conducted on the Internet or the privacy of users may inhibit the growth of the Internet and online commerce. To securely transmit confidential information such as customer credit card numbers, we rely on encryption and authentication technology. Unanticipated events or developments could result in a compromise or breach of the systems we use to protect customer transaction data. Furthermore, our servers may also be vulnerable to viruses transmitted via the Internet. While we proactively check for intrusions into our infrastructure, a new or undetected virus could cause a service disruption.
We maintain an information security program and our processing systems incorporate multiple levels of protection in order to address or otherwise mitigate these risks. Despite these mitigation efforts, there can be no assurance that we will be immune to these risks and not suffer losses in the future. Under current credit card practices and the rules of the online auto auction industry, we may be held liable for fraudulent credit card transactions and other payment disputes with customers. As such, we have implemented certain anti-fraud measures, including credit card verification procedures; however, a failure to adequately prevent fraudulent credit card transactions could adversely affect our consolidated financial position and results of operations.
Our security measures may also be breached due to employee error, malfeasance, insufficiency, or defective design. Additionally, outside parties may attempt to fraudulently induce employees, users, or customers to disclose sensitive information in order to gain access to our data or our users’ or customers’ data. Any such breach or unauthorized access could result in significant legal and financial exposure, damage to our reputation, and a loss of confidence in the security of our products and services that could have an adverse effect on our consolidated financial position and results of operations.
Our business is subject to a variety of domestic and international laws and other obligations regarding privacy and data protection.
We are subject to federal, state and international laws, directives, and regulation relating to the collection, use, retention, disclosure, security and transfer of personal data. These laws, directives, and regulations, and their interpretation and enforcement continue to evolve and may be inconsistent from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Complying with emerging and changing privacy and data protection requirements may cause us to incur substantial costs or require us to change our business practices. For example, in October 2015, a European court decision invalidated the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor framework which allowed us and other companies to meet certain European legal requirements for the transfer of personal data from the European Economic Area to the U.S. We may find it necessary or desirable to modify our data handling practices as a result of this court decision, and it may serve as a basis for our personal data handling practices to be challenged or otherwise adversely impact our business. Noncompliance with our legal obligations relating to privacy and data protection could result in penalties, legal proceedings by governmental entities or others, and significant legal and financial exposure and could affect our ability to retain and attract customers. Any of the risks described above could adversely affect our consolidated financial position and results of operations.

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Implementation of our online auction model in new markets may not result in the same synergies and benefits that we achieved when we implemented the model in North America and the U.K.
We believe that the implementation of our proprietary auction technologies across our operations over the last decade had a favorable impact on our results of operations by increasing the size and geographic scope of our buyer base, increasing the average selling price for vehicles sold through our sales, and lowering expenses associated with vehicle sales.
We implemented our online system across all of our North American and U.K. salvage yards beginning in fiscal 2004 and 2008, respectively, and experienced increases in revenues and average selling prices, as well as improved operating efficiencies in both markets. In considering new markets, we consider the potential synergies from the implementation of our model based in large part on our experience in North America and the U.K. We cannot predict whether these synergies will also be realized in new markets.
Failure to have sufficient capacity to accept additional cars at one or more of our storage facilities could adversely affect our relationships with insurance companies or other sellers of vehicles.
Capacity at our storage facilities varies from period to period and from region to region. For example, following adverse weather conditions in a particular area, our yards in that area may fill and limit our ability to accept additional salvage vehicles while we process existing inventories. For example, Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Sandy had, in certain quarters, an adverse effect on our operating results, in part because of yard capacity constraints in the impacted areas of the United States. We regularly evaluate our capacity in all our markets and where appropriate, seek to increase capacity through the acquisition of additional land and yards. We may not be able to reach agreements to purchase independent storage facilities in markets where we have limited excess capacity, and zoning restrictions or difficulties obtaining use permits may limit our ability to expand our capacity through acquisitions of new land. Failure to have sufficient capacity at one or more of our yards could adversely affect our relationships with insurance companies or other sellers of vehicles, which could have an adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
Because the growth of our business has been due in large part to acquisitions and development of new facilities, the rate of growth of our business and revenues may decline if we are not able to successfully complete acquisitions and develop new facilities.
We seek to increase our sales and profitability through the acquisition of additional facilities and the development of new facilities. For example, in fiscal 2013, we acquired new facilities in Sao Paulo, Brazil; the U.A.E.; Ettlingen, Germany; Cordoba, Spain; and in North America. In fiscal 2014, we acquired a facility in Montreal, Canada. In fiscal 2015, we opened new facilities in Bahrain, Oman and Moncton, Canada. In fiscal 2016 we opened a new facility in India. Promising acquisitions are difficult to identify and complete for a number of reasons, including competition among prospective buyers, the availability of affordable financing in the capital markets and the need to satisfy applicable closing conditions and obtain antitrust and other regulatory approvals on acceptable terms. There can be no assurance that we will be able to:
•    continue to acquire additional facilities on favorable terms;
•    expand existing facilities in no-growth regulatory environments;
•    increase revenues and profitability at acquired and new facilities;
maintain the historical revenue and earnings growth rates we have been able to obtain through facility openings and strategic acquisitions;
•    create new vehicle storage facilities that meet our current revenue and profitability requirements; or
•    obtain necessary regulatory approvals under applicable antitrust and competition laws.
In addition, certain of the acquisition agreements by which we have acquired companies require the former owners to indemnify us against certain liabilities related to the operation of the company before we acquired it. In most of these agreements, however, the liability of the former owners is limited and certain former owners may be unable to meet their indemnification responsibilities. We cannot assure that these indemnification provisions will protect us fully or at all, and as a result we may face unexpected liabilities that adversely affect our financial statements. Any failure to continue to successfully identify and complete acquisitions and develop new facilities could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
As we continue to expand our operations, our failure to manage growth could harm our business and adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
Our ability to manage growth depends not only on our ability to successfully integrate new facilities, but also on our ability to:
•    hire, train and manage additional qualified personnel;
•    establish new relationships or expand existing relationships with vehicle sellers;
•    identify and acquire or lease suitable premises on competitive terms;

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•    secure adequate capital; and
•    maintain the supply of vehicles from vehicle sellers.
Our inability to control or manage these growth factors effectively could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
Our annual and quarterly performance may fluctuate, causing the price of our stock to decline.
Our revenues and operating results have fluctuated in the past and can be expected to continue to fluctuate in the future on a quarterly and annual basis as a result of a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. Factors that may affect our operating results include, but are not limited to, the following:
•    fluctuations in the market value of salvage and used vehicles;
•    fluctuations in commodity prices, particularly the per ton price of crushed car bodies;
•    the impact of foreign exchange gain and loss as a result of international operations;
our ability to successfully integrate our newly acquired operations in international markets and any additional markets we may enter;
•    the availability of salvage vehicles;
•    variations in vehicle accident rates;
•    member participation in the Internet bidding process;
•    delays or changes in state title processing;
•    changes in international, state or federal laws or regulations affecting salvage vehicles;
•    changes in local laws affecting who may purchase salvage vehicles;
•    our ability to integrate and manage our acquisitions successfully;
•    the timing and size of our new facility openings;
•    the announcement of new vehicle supply agreements by us or our competitors;
•    the severity of weather and seasonality of weather patterns;
the amount and timing of operating costs and capital expenditures relating to the maintenance and expansion of our     business, operations and infrastructure;
•    the availability and cost of general business insurance;
•    labor costs and collective bargaining;
•    changes in the current levels of out of state and foreign demand for salvage vehicles;
•    the introduction of a similar Internet product by a competitor; and
•    the ability to obtain necessary permits to operate.
Due to the foregoing factors, our operating results in one or more future periods can be expected to fluctuate. As a result, we believe that period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations are not necessarily meaningful and should not be relied upon as any indication of future performance. In the event such fluctuations result in our financial performance being below the expectations of public market analysts and investors, the price of our common stock could decline substantially.
Our Internet-based sales model has increased the relative importance of intellectual property assets to our business, and any inability to protect those rights could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, or results of operations.
Our intellectual property rights include patents relating to our auction technologies, as well as trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and other intellectual property rights. In addition, we may enter into agreements with third parties regarding the license or other use of our intellectual property in foreign jurisdictions. Effective intellectual property protection may not be available in every country in which our products and services are distributed, deployed, or made available. We seek to maintain certain intellectual property rights as trade secrets. The secrecy could be compromised by third parties, or intentionally or accidentally by our employees, which would cause us to lose the competitive advantage resulting from those trade secrets. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights, or any inability to protect our intellectual property rights, could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

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We also may not be able to acquire or maintain appropriate domain names in all countries in which we do business. Furthermore, regulations governing domain names may not protect our trademarks and similar proprietary rights. We may be unable to prevent third parties from acquiring domain names that are similar to, infringe upon, or diminish the value of our trademarks and other proprietary rights.
We have in the past been and may in the future be subject to intellectual property rights claims, which are costly to defend, could require us to pay damages, and could limit our ability to use certain technologies in the future.
Litigation based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights are common among companies who rely heavily on intellectual property rights. Our reliance on intellectual property rights has increased significantly in recent years as we have implemented our auction-style sales technologies across our business and ceased conducting live auctions. Recent U.S. Supreme Court precedent potentially restricts patentability of software inventions by affirming that patent claims merely requiring application of an abstract idea on standard computers utilizing generic computer functions are patent ineligible, which may impact our ability to enforce our issued patent and obtain new patents. As we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us increases. Litigation and any other intellectual property claims, whether with or without merit, can be time-consuming, expensive to litigate and settle, and can divert management resources and attention from our core business. An adverse determination in current or future litigation could prevent us from offering our products and services in the manner currently conducted. We may also have to pay damages or seek a license for the technology, which may not be available on reasonable terms and which may significantly increase our operating expenses, if it is available for us to license at all. We could also be required to develop alternative non-infringing technology, which could require significant effort and expense.
If we experience problems with our subhaulers and trucking fleet operations, our business could be harmed.
We rely solely upon independent subhaulers to pick up and deliver vehicles to and from our storage facilities in North America, Brazil, U.A.E., Oman, Bahrain, and India. We also utilize, to a lesser extent, independent subhaulers in the U.K. Our failure to pick up and deliver vehicles in a timely and accurate manner could harm our reputation and brand, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Further, an increase in fuel cost may lead to increased prices charged by our independent subhaulers, which may significantly increase our cost. We may not be able to pass these costs on to our sellers or buyers.
In addition to using independent subhaulers, in the U.K. we utilize a fleet of company trucks to pick up and deliver vehicles from our U.K. storage facilities. In connection therewith, we are subject to the risks associated with providing trucking services, including inclement weather, disruptions in transportation infrastructure, availability and price of fuel, any of which could result in an increase in our operating expenses and reduction in our net income.
We are partially self-insured for certain losses and if our estimates of the cost of future claims differ from actual trends, our results of operations could be harmed.
We are partially self-insured for certain losses related to medical insurance, general liability, workers’ compensation and auto liability. Our liability represents an estimate of the ultimate cost of claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. The estimated liability is not discounted and is established based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates. Further, we utilize independent actuaries to assist us in establishing the proper amount of reserves for anticipated payouts associated with these self-insured exposures. While we believe these estimates are reasonable based on the information currently available, if actual trends, including the severity of claims and medical cost inflation, differ from our estimates, our results of operations could be impacted.
Our executive officers, directors and their affiliates hold a large percentage of our stock and their interests may differ from other stockholders.
Our executive officers, directors and their affiliates beneficially own, in the aggregate, 21.0% of our common stock as of January 31, 2016 . If they were to act together, these stockholders would have significant influence over most matters requiring approval by stockholders, including the election of directors, any amendments to our certificate of incorporation and certain significant corporate transactions, including potential merger or acquisition transactions. In addition, without the consent of these stockholders, we could be delayed or prevented from entering into transactions that could be beneficial to us or our other investors. These stockholders may take these actions even if they are opposed by our other investors.

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We have certain provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, which may have an anti-takeover effect or that may delay, defer or prevent acquisition bids for us that a stockholder might consider favorable and limit attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.
Our board of directors is authorized to create and issue from time to time, without stockholder approval, up to an aggregate of 5,000,000 shares of undesignated preferred stock, the terms of which may be established and shares of which may be issued without stockholder approval, and which may include rights superior to the rights of the holders of common stock. In addition, our bylaws establish advance notice requirements for nominations for elections to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by stockholders at stockholder meetings. These anti-takeover provisions and other provisions under Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for stockholders to elect directors of their choosing and cause us to take other corporate actions the stockholders desire.
If we lose key management or are unable to attract and retain the talent required for our business, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our objectives.
Our future success depends in large part upon the leadership and performance of our executive management team, all of whom are employed on an at-will basis and none of whom are subject to any agreements not to compete. If we lose the service of one or more of our executive officers or key employees, in particular Willis J. Johnson, our Chairman; A. Jayson Adair, our Chief Executive Officer; Vincent W. Mitz, our President; and William E. Franklin, our Executive Vice President, or if one or more of these executives decide to join a competitor or otherwise compete directly or indirectly with us, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our business objectives.
Cash investments are subject to risks.
We may invest our excess cash in securities or money market funds backed by securities, which may include U.S. treasuries, other federal, state and municipal debt, bonds, preferred stock, commercial paper, insurance contracts and other securities both privately and publicly traded. All securities are subject to risk, including fluctuations in interest rates, credit risk, market risk and systemic economic risk. Changes or movements in any of these risk factors may result in a loss or impairment to our invested cash and may have a material effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
Rapid technological changes may render our technology obsolete or decrease the competitiveness of our services.
To remain competitive, we must continue to enhance and improve the functionality and features of our websites and software. The Internet and the online commerce industry are rapidly changing. In particular, the online commerce industry is characterized by increasingly complex systems and infrastructures. If competitors introduce new services embodying new technologies or if new industry standards and practices emerge, our existing websites and proprietary technology and systems may become obsolete. Our future success will depend on our ability to:
enhance our existing services;
develop and license new services and technologies that address the increasingly sophisticated and varied needs of our prospective customers; and
respond to technological advances and emerging industry standards and practices in a cost-effective and timely basis.
Developing our websites and other proprietary technology entails significant technical and business risks. We may use new technologies ineffectively or we may fail to adapt our websites, transaction-processing systems and network infrastructure to customer requirements or emerging industry standards. If we face material delays in introducing new services, products and enhancements, our customers and suppliers may forego the use of our services and use those of our competitors.  
New member programs could impact our operating results.
We have or will initiate programs to open our auctions to the general public. These programs include the Registered Broker program through which the public can purchase vehicles through a registered member and the Market Maker program through which registered members can open Copart storefronts with Internet kiosks enabling the general public to search our inventory and purchase vehicles. Initiating programs that allow access to our online auctions to the general public may involve material expenditures and we cannot predict what future benefit, if any, will be derived.

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Factors such as mild weather conditions can have an adverse effect on our revenues and operating results, as well as our revenue and earnings growth rates, by reducing the available supply of salvage vehicles. Conversely, extreme weather conditions can result in an oversupply of salvage vehicles that requires us to incur abnormal expenses to respond to market demands.
Mild weather conditions tend to result in a decrease in the available supply of salvage vehicles because traffic accidents decrease and fewer automobiles are damaged. Accordingly, mild weather can have an adverse effect on our salvage vehicle inventories, which would be expected to have an adverse effect on our revenue and operating results and related growth rates. Conversely, our inventories will tend to increase in poor weather such as a harsh winter or as a result of adverse weather-related conditions such as flooding. During periods of mild weather conditions, our ability to increase our revenues and improve our operating results and related growth will be increasingly dependent on our ability to obtain additional vehicle sellers and to compete more effectively in the market, each of which is subject to the other risks and uncertainties described in these sections. In addition, extreme weather conditions, although they increase the available supply of salvage cars, can have an adverse effect on our operating results. For example, during fiscal 2006 and fiscal 2013, we recognized substantial additional costs associated with Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Sandy. Weather events have had, in certain quarters, an adverse effect on our operating results, in part because of yard capacity constraints in the impacted areas of the U.S. These additional costs were characterized as “abnormal” under ASC 330, Inventory, and included the additional subhauling, payroll, equipment and facilities expenses directly related to the operating conditions created by the hurricanes. In the event that we were to again experience extremely adverse weather or other anomalous conditions that result in an abnormally high number of salvage vehicles in one or more of our markets, those conditions could have an adverse effect on our future operating results.
Macroeconomic factors such as high fuel prices, declines in commodity prices, declines in used car prices, and vehicle-related technological advances may have an adverse effect on our revenues and operating results, as well as our earnings growth rates.
Macroeconomic factors that affect oil prices and the automobile and commodity markets can have adverse effects on our revenues, revenue growth rates (if any), and operating results. Significant increases in the cost of fuel could lead to a reduction in miles driven per car and a reduction in accident rates. A material reduction in accident rates, whether due to, among other things, a reduction in miles driven per car, vehicle-related technological advances such as accident avoidance systems and, to the extent widely adopted, the advent of driverless cars, could have a material impact on revenue growth. In addition, under our Percentage Incentive Program contracts, or PIP, the cost of towing the vehicle to one of our facilities is included in the PIP fee. We may incur increased fees, which we may not be able to pass on to our vehicle sellers. A material increase in tow rates could have a material impact on our operating results. Volatility in fuel, commodity, and used car prices could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and revenue growth rates in future periods.
The salvage vehicle sales industry is highly competitive and we may not be able to compete successfully.
We face significant competition for the supply of salvage vehicles and for the buyers of those vehicles. We believe our principal competitors include other auction and vehicle remarketing service companies with whom we compete directly in obtaining vehicles from insurance companies and other sellers, and large vehicle dismantlers, who may buy salvage vehicles directly from insurance companies, bypassing the salvage sales process. Many of the insurance companies have established relationships with competitive remarketing companies and large dismantlers. Certain of our competitors may have greater financial resources than us. Due to the limited number of vehicle sellers, particularly in the U.K., the absence of long-term contractual commitments between us and our sellers and the increasingly competitive market environment, there can be no assurance that our competitors will not gain market share at our expense.
We may also encounter significant competition for local, regional and national supply agreements with vehicle sellers. There can be no assurance that the existence of other local, regional or national contracts entered into by our competitors will not have a material adverse effect on our business or our expansion plans. Furthermore, we are likely to face competition from major competitors in the acquisition of vehicle storage facilities, which could significantly increase the cost of such acquisitions and thereby materially impede our expansion objectives or have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations. These potential new competitors may include consolidators of automobile dismantling businesses, organized salvage vehicle buying groups, automobile manufacturers, automobile auctioneers and software companies. While most vehicle sellers have abandoned or reduced efforts to sell salvage vehicles directly without the use of service providers such as us, there can be no assurance that this trend will continue, which could adversely affect our market share, consolidated results of operations and financial position. Additionally, existing or new competitors may be significantly larger and have greater financial and marketing resources than us; therefore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to compete successfully in the future.

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Government regulation of the salvage vehicle sales industry may impair our operations, increase our costs of doing business and create potential liability.
Participants in the salvage vehicle sales industry are subject to, and may be required to expend funds to ensure compliance with a variety of governmental, regulatory and administrative rules, regulations, land use ordinances, licensure requirements and procedures, including those governing vehicle registration, the environment, zoning and land use. Failure to comply with present or future regulations or changes in interpretations of existing regulations may result in impairment of our operations and the imposition of penalties and other liabilities. At various times, we may be involved in disputes with local governmental officials regarding the development and/or operation of our business facilities. We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with applicable regulatory requirements. We may be subject to similar types of regulations by federal, national, international, provincial, state, and local governmental agencies in new markets. In addition, new regulatory requirements or changes in existing requirements may delay or increase the cost of opening new facilities, may limit our base of salvage vehicle buyers and may decrease demand for our vehicles.
Changes in laws affecting the importation of salvage vehicles may have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition.
Our Internet-based auction-style model has allowed us to offer our products and services to international markets and has increased our international buyer base. As a result, foreign importers of salvage vehicles now represent a significant part of our total buyer base. Changes in laws and regulations that restrict the importation of salvage vehicles into foreign countries may reduce the demand for salvage vehicles and impact our ability to maintain or increase our international buyer base. For example, in March 2008, a decree issued by the president of Mexico became effective that placed restrictions on the types of vehicles that can be imported into Mexico from the U.S. The adoption of similar laws or regulations in other jurisdictions that have the effect of reducing or curtailing our activities abroad could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position by reducing the demand for our products and services.
The operation of our storage facilities poses certain environmental risks, which could adversely affect our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
Our operations are subject to federal, state, national, provincial and local laws and regulations regarding the protection of the environment in the countries which we have storage facilities. In the salvage vehicle remarketing industry, large numbers of wrecked vehicles are stored at storage facilities and during that time, spills of fuel, motor oil and other fluids may occur, resulting in soil, surface water or groundwater contamination. In addition, certain of our facilities generate and/or store petroleum products and other hazardous materials, including waste solvents and used oil. In the U.K., we provide vehicle de-pollution and crushing services for end-of-life program vehicles. We could incur substantial expenditures for preventative, investigative or remedial action and could be exposed to liability arising from our operations, contamination by previous users of certain of our acquired facilities or facilities which we may acquire in the future, or the disposal of our waste at off-site locations. Environmental laws and regulations could become more stringent over time and there can be no assurance that we or our operations will not be subject to significant costs in the future. Although we have obtained indemnification for pre-existing environmental liabilities from many of the persons and entities from whom we have acquired facilities, there can be no assurance that such indemnifications will be adequate. Any such expenditures or liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
Adverse U.S. and international economic conditions may negatively affect our business, operating results, or financial condition.
The capital and credit markets have historically experienced extreme volatility and disruption, which has in the past and may in the future lead to economic downturns in the U.S. and abroad. As a result of any economic downturn, the number of miles driven may decrease, which may lead to fewer accident claims, a reduction of vehicle repairs, and fewer salvage vehicles. Increases in unemployment, as a result of any economic downturn, may lead to an increase in the number of uninsured motorists. Uninsured motorists are responsible for disposition of their vehicle if involved in an accident. Disposition generally is either the repair or disposal of the vehicle. In the situation where the owner of the wrecked vehicle, and not an insurance company, is responsible for its disposition, we believe it is more likely that vehicle will be repaired or, if disposed, disposed through channels other than us. Adverse credit markets may also affect the ability of members to secure financing to purchase salvaged vehicles which may adversely affect demand. In addition, if the banking system or the financial markets deteriorate or are volatile, our credit facility or our ability to obtain additional debt or equity financing may be affected. These adverse economic conditions and events may have a negative effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial position.
If we determine that our goodwill has become impaired, we could incur significant charges that would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations.
Goodwill represents the excess of cost over the fair market value of assets acquired in business combinations. In recent years, the amount of goodwill on our consolidated balance sheets has increased substantially, principally as a result of a series of acquisitions we have made in North America, the U.K., Brazil, Germany, the U.A.E., and Spain in fiscal 2013 and 2014. As of January 31, 2016 , the amount of goodwill on our consolidated balance sheet subject to future impairment testing was $264.1 million .

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Pursuant to ASC 350, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other , we are required to annually test goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives to determine if impairment has occurred. Additionally, interim reviews must be performed whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that impairment may have occurred. If the testing performed indicates that impairment has occurred, we are required to record a non-cash impairment charge for the difference between the carrying value of the goodwill or other intangible assets and the implied fair value of the goodwill or other intangible assets in the period the determination is made. The testing of goodwill and other intangible assets for impairment requires us to make significant estimates about our future performance and cash flows, as well as other assumptions. These estimates can be affected by numerous factors, including changes in the definition of a business segment in which we operate; changes in economic, industry or market conditions; changes in business operations; changes in competition; or potential changes in the share price of our common stock and market capitalization. Changes in these factors, or changes in actual performance compared with estimates of our future performance, could affect the fair value of goodwill or other intangible assets, which may result in an impairment charge. For example, continued deterioration in worldwide economic conditions could affect these assumptions and lead us to determine that goodwill impairment is required with respect to our acquisitions in North America, the U.K., Brazil, Germany, the U.A.E. or Spain. We cannot accurately predict the amount or timing of any impairment of assets. Should the value of our goodwill or other intangible assets become impaired, it could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and could result in our incurring net losses in future periods.
An adverse outcome of our appeal to the Georgia Tax Tribunal of the Georgia Department of Revenue's final assessment in connection with its sales tax audit could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
The Georgia Department of Revenue, or DOR, has conducted a sales and use tax audit of our operations in Georgia for the period from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011. As a result of their initial audit, the DOR issued a notice of proposed assessment for uncollected sales taxes in which it asserted that we failed to collect and remit sales taxes totaling $73.8 million , including penalties and interest. According to the DOR, the proposed assessment was based on its initial determination that our sales did not constitute nontaxable sales for resale.

Subsequently, we engaged a Georgia law firm and outside tax advisors to review the conduct of our business operations in Georgia, the notice of proposed assessment, and the DOR’s policy position. In particular, our outside legal counsel provided us with an opinion that the sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax. In rendering its opinion, our counsel noted that non-U.S. registered resellers are unable to comply strictly with technical requirements for a Georgia certificate of exemption but concluded that our sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax notwithstanding this technical inability to comply.

Since our receipt of the notice of proposed assessment, our counsel and we have engaged in active discussions with the DOR to resolve the matter. On June 5, 2015 , following our discussions and after additional review of documentation, the DOR provided us with revised audit work papers computing a sales tax liability of $2.7 million before interest and any penalties.

On June 22, 2015 , representatives of the DOR and the Office of the Attorney General for the State of Georgia informed our counsel that the DOR intended to issue a formal notice of assessment for an estimated $100.0 million , based on the DOR’s original proposed assessment of $73.8 million plus additional accumulated interest and penalties. On August 4, 2015 , the DOR issued an official Assessment and Demand for Payment for $96.1 million for sales taxes, penalties, and interest that the DOR alleges we owe the State of Georgia. We filed an appeal of this notice of assessment from the DOR with the Georgia Tax Tribunal on September 3, 2015.

Based on the opinion from our outside law firm, advice from our outside tax advisors, and our best estimate of a probable outcome, we believe that we have adequately provided for the payment of any assessment in our consolidated financial statements. We believe we have strong defenses to the DOR’s notice of assessment and intend to defend this matter. There can be no assurance that this matter will be resolved in our favor or that we will not ultimately be required to make a substantial payment to the Georgia DOR. We understand that litigating and defending the matter in Georgia could be expensive and time-consuming and result in substantial management distraction. If the matter were to be resolved in a manner adverse to us, it could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
New accounting pronouncements or new interpretations of existing standards could require us to make adjustments to accounting policies that could adversely affect the consolidated financial statements.
The Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, and the SEC, from time to time issue new pronouncements or new interpretations of existing accounting standards that require changes to our accounting policies and procedures. To date, we do not believe any new pronouncements or interpretations have had a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position, but future pronouncements or interpretations could require a change or changes in our policies or procedures.

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Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could result in declines in our reported revenues and earnings.
Our reported revenues and earnings are subject to fluctuations in currency exchange rates. We do not engage in foreign currency hedging arrangements; consequently, foreign currency fluctuations may adversely affect our revenues and earnings. Should we choose to engage in hedging activities in the future we cannot be assured our hedges will be effective or that the costs of the hedges will exceed their benefits. Fluctuations in the rate of exchange between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies, primarily the British pound, Canadian dollar, U.A.E. dirham, Bahraini dinar, Omani rial, Brazilian real, Indian rupee, and Euro could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position.
If interest rate swaps entered into in connection with our credit facility prove ineffective, it could result in volatility in our operating results, including potential losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows.
We had entered into two interest rate swaps to exchange our variable interest rate payment commitments for fixed interest rate payments on our variable interest rate debt through December 2015, at which time the interest rate swaps were allowed to expire. We recorded the swaps at fair value, and had designated it as an effective cash flow hedge under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging . Each quarter, we measured hedge effectiveness using the “hypothetical derivative method” and recorded in earnings any gains or losses resulting from hedge ineffectiveness. The hedge provided by our swaps could have proven to be ineffective for a number of reasons, including early retirement of the variable interest rate debt, as was allowed under the variable interest rate debt, or in the event the counterparty to the interest rate swaps were determined to not be creditworthy. Any determination that the hedge created by the swaps was ineffective could have had a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows and result in volatility in our operating results. In addition, any changes in relevant accounting standards relating to the swaps, especially ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging , could materially increase earnings volatility. We may enter into additional interest rate swaps in the future to exchange our variable interest rate payment commitments for fixed interest rate payments on our variable interest rate debt at which point these risks could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows and result in volatility in our operating results.



39


ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
The following table sets forth information concerning the number of shares of our common stock purchased by us during the three months ended January 31, 2016 :
Period
Total
Number of
Shares
 
Average
Price Paid
Per Share
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Program
 
Maximum Number
of Shares That May
Yet be Purchased
Under the Program (1)
Balance at October 31, 2015

 
$

 

 
47,481,718

November 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015

 
$

 

 
47,481,718

December 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015
8,333,333 (2)

 
$
39.00

 

 
47,481,718

January 1, 2016 through January 31, 2016

 
$

 

 
47,481,718

(1) Our stock repurchase program was announced on February 20, 2003. On September 22, 2011, our board of directors approved a 40 million share increase in our stock repurchase program, bringing the total current authorization to 98 million shares. The repurchase may be effected through solicited or unsolicited transactions in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions, No time limit has been placed on the duration of the stock repurchase program. Subject to applicable securities laws, such repurchases will be made at such times and in such amounts as we deem appropriate and may be discontinued at any time.
(2) 8.333.333 shares were repurchased by us through a modified "Dutch Auction" tender offer under which we were to purchase up to 7,317,073 shares of our common stock at a price not greater than $41.00 nor less than $38.00 per share. The tender offer was announced on November 23, 2015 and was completed on December 30, 2015.
ITEM 6. EXHIBITS
a)
Exhibits
3.1
 
Copart, Inc. Certificate of Incorporation
10.26
 
Executive Officer Employment Agreement, effective January 4, 2016, between the Registrant and Jeffrey Liaw (incorporated by reference herein to Exhibit 10.26 of the Registrant's Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC on November 23, 2015 (File No. 000-23255))
31.1
 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2
 
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1(1)
 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2(1)
 
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS
 
XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF
 
XBRL Extension Definition
101.LAB
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE
 
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
(1)
 
In accordance with Item 601(b)(32)(ii) of Regulation S-K and SEC Release No. 33-8238 and 34-47986, Final Rule: Management’s Reports on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting and Certification of Disclosure in Exchange Act Periodic Reports, the certifications furnished in Exhibits 32.1 and 32.2 hereto are deemed to accompany this Form 10-Q and will not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act. Such certifications will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filings under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that the registrant specifically incorporates it by reference.

40


SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
COPART, INC.
 
 
 
/s/ Jeffrey Liaw
 
Jeffrey Liaw, Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial
 
and Accounting Officer and duly Authorized Officer)
Date: February 25, 2016

41
Exhibit 3.1

CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION OF
COPART, INC.
(As amended December 2, 2015)
Article I
The name of the corporation is Copart, Inc.
ARTICLE II     
The address of the corporation’s registered office in the State of Delaware is 2711 Centerville Road, Suite 400, City of Wilmington, County of New Castle, Delaware, 19808. The name of the registered agent at such address is Corporation Service Company.
ARTICLE III     
The purpose of the corporation is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which corporations may be organized under the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware (the “ DGCL ”).
ARTICLE IV     
A. Authorized Shares . The total number of shares of stock that the corporation shall have authority to issue is 185,000,000 405,000,000, consisting of the following:
i. Common Stock . 180,000,000 400,000,000 shares of Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share. Each share of Common Stock shall entitle the holder thereof to one (1) vote on each matter submitted to a vote at a meeting of stockholders; provided , however , that, except as otherwise required by law, holders of Common Stock shall not be entitled to vote on any amendment to this Certificate of Incorporation (including any Preferred Stock Designation (as defined herein) relating to any series of Preferred Stock) that relates solely to the terms of one or more outstanding series of Preferred Stock if the holders of such affected series are entitled, either separately or together as a class with the holders of one or more other such series, to vote thereon pursuant to this Certificate of Incorporation (including any Preferred Stock Designation relating to any series of Preferred Stock).
ii. Blank Check Preferred Stock . 5,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, which may be issued from time to time in one or more series pursuant to a resolution or resolutions providing for such issue duly adopted by the Board of Directors (authority to do so being hereby expressly vested in the Board of Directors), and by filing a certificate pursuant to the applicable law of the State of Delaware (such certificate being referred to herein as a “Preferred Stock Designation”). The Board of Directors is further authorized, subject to limitations prescribed by law, to fix by resolution or resolutions the designations, powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions thereof, of any wholly unissued series of Preferred Stock, including without limitation authority to fix by resolution or resolutions the dividend rights, dividend rate, conversion rights, voting rights, rights and terms of redemption (including sinking fund provisions), redemption price or prices, and liquidation preferences of any such series, and the number of shares constituting any such series and the designation thereof, or any of the foregoing.





B. Vote to Increase or Decrease Authorized Shares . The number of authorized shares of Preferred Stock may be increased or decreased (but not below the number of shares thereof then outstanding) by the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of the voting power of all of the then-outstanding shares of capital stock of the corporation entitled to vote thereon, without a vote of the holders of the Preferred Stock, or of any series thereof, unless a vote of any such holders is required pursuant to the terms of any Preferred Stock Designation. The Board of Directors is further authorized to increase (but not above the total number of authorized shares of the class) or decrease (but not below the number of shares of any such series then outstanding) the number of shares of any series, the number of which was fixed by it, subsequent to the issuance of shares of such series then outstanding, subject to the powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations and restrictions thereof stated in the Certificate of Incorporation or the resolution of the Board of Directors originally fixing the number of shares of such series. If the number of shares of any series is so decreased, then the shares constituting such decrease shall resume the status which they had prior to the adoption of the resolution originally fixing the number of shares of such series.
ARTICLE V     
A. Board Size . The number of directors that constitutes the entire Board of Directors of the corporation shall be fixed by, or in the manner provided in, the Bylaws of the corporation. At each annual meeting of stockholders, directors of the corporation shall be elected to hold office until the next annual meeting of stockholders and until their successors have been duly elected and qualified or until their earlier resignation or removal.
B. Vacancies . Vacancies occurring on the Board of Directors for any reason and newly created directorships resulting from an increase in the authorized number of directors may be filled by vote of a majority of the remaining members of the Board of Directors, although less than a quorum, or by a sole remaining director, at any meeting of the Board of Directors. A person so elected by the Board of Directors to fill a vacancy or newly created directorship shall hold office until the next succeeding annual meeting of stockholders and until his or her successor shall be duly elected and qualified or until his or her earlier resignation or removal.
ARTICLE VI     
Except as otherwise provided in the Bylaws, the Bylaws may be amended or repealed or new Bylaws adopted by the vote or written consent of holders of a majority of the voting power of the outstanding shares entitled to vote generally in the election of directors. In furtherance and not in limitation of the powers conferred by statute, the Board of Directors of the corporation is expressly authorized to adopt, amend or repeal the Bylaws of the corporation.
ARTICLE VII     
Elections of directors need not be by written ballot unless the Bylaws of the corporation shall so provide.
ARTICLE VIII     
A. Stockholder Action by Written Consent . Any action required or permitted to be taken at an annual or special meeting of stockholders may be taken without a meeting, without prior notice and without a vote, if a consent or consents in writing, setting forth the action so taken, shall be signed by holders of record on the record date (established in the manner provided in Paragraph B of this Article VIII) of outstanding shares of the corporation having not less than the minimum number of votes that would be necessary to authorize or take such action at a

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meeting at which all shares entitled to vote thereon were present and voted; provided, however, that in the case of the election or removal of directors by written consent, such consent shall be effective only if signed by the holders of all outstanding shares entitled to vote for the election of directors.
B. Record Date . In order that the corporation may determine the stockholders entitled to consent to corporate action in writing without a meeting, the Board of Directors may fix a record date, which record date shall not precede the date upon which the resolution fixing the record date is adopted by the Board of Directors, and which record date shall not be more than ten days after the date upon which the resolution fixing the record date is adopted by the Board of Directors. Any stockholder of record seeking to have the stockholders authorize or take corporate action by written consent shall, by written notice to the attention of the Secretary of the corporation, request the Board of Directors to fix a record date. The Board of Directors shall promptly, but in all events within ten days after the date on which such a request is received, adopt a resolution fixing the record date (unless a record date has previously been fixed by the Board of Directors pursuant to the first sentence of this Paragraph B of Article VIII). If no record date has been fixed by the Board of Directors within ten days of the date on which such a request is received, the record date for determining stockholders entitled to consent to corporate action in writing without a meeting, when no prior action by the Board of Directors is required by applicable law, shall be the first date on which a signed written consent setting forth the action taken or proposed to be taken is delivered to the corporation by delivery to its registered office in the State of Delaware, its principal place of business, or an officer or agent of the corporation having custody of the book in which proceedings of meetings of stockholders are recorded. If no record date has been fixed by the Board of Directors and prior action by the Board of Directors is required by applicable law, the record date for determining stockholders entitled to consent to corporate action in writing without a meeting shall be at the close of business on the date on which the Board of Directors adopts the resolution taking such prior action.
ARTICLE IX     
At any election of directors of the corporation, a holder of any class or series of stock then entitled to vote in such election shall be entitled to as many votes as shall equal the number of votes which (except for this Article IX as to cumulative voting) such holder would be entitled to cast for the election of directors with respect to such holder’s shares of stock multiplied by the number of directors to be elected in the election in which such holder’s class or series of shares is entitled to vote, and such holder may cast all of such votes for a single director or may distribute them among the number to be voted for, or for any two or more of them as such holder may see fit.
ARTICLE X     
Special meetings of the stockholders may be called at any time by the Board of Directors acting pursuant to a resolution adopted by a majority of the total number of authorized directors (whether or not there exist any vacancies in previously authorized directorships), the chairman of the Board of Directors, or the chief executive officer, and special meetings may not be called by any other person or persons; provided, however , that special meetings of the stockholders of the corporation shall be called by the secretary of the corporation following his or her receipt at the principal executive offices of the corporation of one or more written demands to call a special meeting of the stockholders submitted by or on behalf of the holder or holders of record of at least ten percent (10%) of the total voting power of all issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of the corporation entitled to vote generally in the election of the Board of Directors (the “ Requisite Percentage ”); provided, further , that such stockholder demand or demands shall have been submitted in accordance with and in the form required by the Bylaws. Special meetings of the stockholders of the corporation (including those called by the secretary following receipt of a written demand or demands from stockholders holding the Requisite Percentage) shall be held on such

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date, at such time, and at such place, if any, as shall be designated by the Board of Directors and stated in the corporation’s notice of meeting. In the case of a special meeting called by the secretary following receipt of a written demand or demands from stockholders holding the Requisite Percentage, the date of such special meeting, as fixed by the Board of Directors in accordance with this Article X and the Bylaws, shall not be fewer than thirty (30) days nor more than ninety (90) days (the “ Outside Date ”) after the date a demand or demands by stockholders holding the Requisite Percentage have been received by the secretary of the corporation at the principal executive offices of the corporation in accordance with this Article X and the Bylaws. To be in proper form, a demand or demands from stockholders holding the Requisite Percentage shall include the information, documents and instruments specified in the Bylaws. The Board of Directors may postpone or reschedule any previously scheduled special meeting; provided, however, that the Board of Directors may not reschedule a special meeting called in response to a written demand or demands to call such meeting received by the secretary from stockholders holding the Requisite Percentage nor may the Board of Directors postpone such meeting beyond the Outside Date.
ARTICLE XI     
A. Director Exculpation . To the fullest extent permitted by the DGCL, as it presently exists, a director of the corporation shall not be personally liable to the corporation or its stockholders for monetary damages for breach of fiduciary duty as a director. If the DGCL is amended to authorize corporate action further eliminating or limiting the personal liability of directors, then the liability of a director of the corporation shall be eliminated or limited to the fullest extent permitted by the DGCL, as so amended.
B. Permissive Indemnification . The corporation shall have the power to indemnify to the fullest extent permitted by law any person made or threatened to be made a party to an action or proceeding, whether criminal, civil, administrative or investigative, by reason of the fact that he, she, his or her testator or his or her intestate is or was a director, officer, employee or agent of the corporation or any predecessor of the corporation or serves or served at any other enterprise as a director, officer, employee or agent at the request of the corporation or any predecessor to the corporation.
C. Vested Rights . Neither any amendment nor repeal of this Article XI, nor the adoption of any provision of this Certificate of Incorporation or the Bylaws of the corporation inconsistent with this Article XI, shall eliminate or reduce the effect of this Article XI in respect of any matter occurring, or any cause of action, suit, claim or proceeding accruing or arising or that, but for this Article XI, would accrue or arise, prior to such amendment, repeal or adoption of an inconsistent provision.
ARTICLE XII     
Except as provided in Article XI above, the corporation reserves the right to amend, alter, change or repeal any provision contained in this Certificate of Incorporation, in the manner now or hereafter prescribed by statute, and all rights conferred upon stockholders herein are granted subject to this reservation.

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ARTICLE XIII     
Unless the corporation consents in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware shall be the sole and exclusive forum for (A) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of the corporation, (B) any action or proceeding asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any director, officer or other employee of the corporation to the corporation or the corporation’s stockholders, (C) any action or proceeding asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the DGCL or the corporation’s Certificate of Incorporation or Bylaws, or (D) any action or proceeding asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine.
ARTICLE XIV     
Pursuant to Section 203(b)(1) of the DGCL, the corporation shall not be governed by the provisions of Section 203 of the DGCL.
ARTICLE XV
The name and mailing address of the incorporator are as follows:
Paul A. Styer
c/o Copart, Inc.
4665 Business Center Drive
Fairfield, California 94534
I, THE UNDERSIGNED, being the incorporator, for the purpose of forming a corporation under the laws of the State of Delaware do make, file and record this Certificate of Incorporation, do certify that the facts herein stated are true, and, accordingly, have hereto set my hand this 6th day of January, 2012.

                         /s/Paul A. Styer
Paul A. Styer
Incorporator



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EXHIBIT 31.1
CERTIFICATION OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER PURSUANT TO
EXCHANGE ACT RULE 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a)
AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 302
OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002
I, A. Jayson Adair, certify that:
1.
I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of Copart, Inc.;
2.
Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;
3.
Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;
4.
The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:
a)
Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;
b)
Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;
c)
Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and
d)
Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and
5.
The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):
a)
All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and
b)
Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
Date: February 25, 2016
 
 
 
/s/ A. Jayson Adair
 
A. Jayson Adair