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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549



FORM 20-F



(Mark One)    

o

 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

OR                                                             

ý

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

OR                                                             

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                    to                    .

OR                                                             

o

 

SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Date of event requiring this shell company report                    .

Commission file number: 001-36619

AFFIMED N.V.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
The Netherlands

(Jurisdiction of incorporation
or organization)
  Technologiepark, Im Neuenheimer Feld 582
69120 Heidelberg, Germany,
(+49) 6221-6743-60


(Address of principal
executive offices)
  Adi Hoess, Chief Executive Officer
Tel: (+49) 6221-6743-60
Technologiepark, Im Neuenheimer Feld 582
69120 Heidelberg, Germany


(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile
number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Copy to:
Sophia Hudson
Kirkland & Ellis LLP
601 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212 446 4750
Fax: 212 446 4900

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class   Trading Symbol   Name of each exchange on which registered
Common shares, nominal value €0.01 per share   AFMD   The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer's classes of capital stock or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report.

Common shares: 98,287,333

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

o Yes    ý No

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

o Yes    ý No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

ý Yes    o No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

o Yes    ý No (not required)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large, accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See definition of "large, accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large Accelerated Filer o   Accelerated Filer ý   Non-accelerated Filer o   Emerging growth company o

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

†The term "new or revised financial accounting standard" refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attention to its management's assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report ý

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

U.S. GAAP o   International Financial Reporting Standards as issued
by the International Accounting Standards Board ý
  Other o

If "Other" has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow.

o Item 17    o Item 18

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management's assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. ý

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

o Yes    ý No


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  PAGE  

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

    iii  

PART I

    1  

ITEM 1.    IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

    1  

A.

  Directors and senior management     1  

B.

  Advisers     1  

C.

  Auditors     1  

ITEM 2.    OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

    1  

A.

  Offer statistics     1  

B.

  Method and expected timetable     1  

ITEM 3.    KEY INFORMATION

    1  

A.

  Selected Financial Data     1  

B.

  Capitalization and indebtedness     1  

C.

  Reasons for the offer and use of proceeds     1  

D.

  Risk factors     1  

ITEM 4.    INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

    53  

A.

  History and development of the company     53  

B.

  Business overview     55  

C.

  Organizational structure     93  

D.

  Property, plant and equipment     93  

ITEM 4A.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

    93  

ITEM 5.    OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

    93  

A.

  Operating Results Overview     94  

B.

  Liquidity and Capital Resources     101  

C.

  Research and development, patents and licenses, etc.     104  

D.

  Trend information     104  

E.

  Off-balance sheet arrangements     104  

F.

  Tabular disclosure of contractual obligations     105  

G.

  Safe harbor     105  

ITEM 6.    DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

    105  

A.

  Directors and senior management     105  

B.

  Compensation     110  

C.

  Board practices     114  

D.

  Employees     116  

E.

  Share ownership     116  

ITEM 7.    MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

    117  

A.

  Major shareholders     117  

B.

  Related party transactions     120  

C.

  Interests of Experts and Counsel     120  

ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL INFORMATION

    120  

A.

  Consolidated statements and other financial information     120  

B.

  Significant changes     121  

ITEM 9.    THE OFFER AND LISTING

    121  

A.

  Offering and listing details     121  

B.

  Plan of distribution     121  

C.

  Markets     121  

D.

  Selling shareholders     121  

E.

  Dilution     121  

F.

  Expenses of the issue     121  

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  PAGE  

ITEM 10.    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

    121  

A.

  Share capital     121  

B.

  Memorandum and articles of association     121  

C.

  Material contracts     121  

D.

  Exchange controls     121  

E.

  Taxation     122  

F.

  Dividends and paying agents     141  

G.

  Statement by experts     141  

H.

  Documents on display     141  

I.

  Subsidiary information     141  

ITEM 11.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT RISK

    141  

ITEM 12.    DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

    141  

A.

  Debt securities     141  

B.

  Warrants and rights     141  

C.

  Other securities     141  

D.

  American Depositary Shares     141  

PART II

    142  

ITEM 13.    DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

    142  

A.

  Defaults     142  

B.

  Arrears and delinquencies     142  

ITEM 14.    MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

    142  

A.

  Use of Proceeds     142  

ITEM 15.    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

    142  

A.

  Disclosure Controls and Procedures     142  

B.

  Management's Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting     142  

C.

  Attestation Report of the Registered Public Accounting Firm     143  

D.

  Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting     143  

ITEM 16.    [RESERVED]

    143  

ITEM 16A.    Audit committee financial expert

    143  

ITEM 16B.    Code of ethics

    143  

ITEM 16C.    Principal Accountant Fees and Services

    143  

ITEM 16D.    Exemptions from the listing standards for audit committees

    144  

ITEM 16E.    Purchases of equity securities by the issuer and affiliated purchasers

    144  

ITEM 16F.    Change in registrant's certifying accountant

    144  

ITEM 16G.    Corporate governance

    144  

ITEM 16H.    Mine safety disclosure

    145  

PART III

    145  

ITEM 17.    Financial statements

    145  

ITEM 18.    Financial statements

    145  

ITEM 19.    Exhibits

    145  

        Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, all references in this Annual Report on Form 20-F (the "Annual Report") to "Affimed N.V." or "Affimed," the "Company," "we," "our," "ours," "us" or similar terms refer to Affimed N.V., together with its subsidiaries.


TRADEMARKS

        ROCK® ("Redirected Optimized Cell Killing") and ICE® ("Innate Cell Engager") are our registered trademarks.The trademarks, trade names and service marks appearing in this Annual Report are property of their respective owners.

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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS AND RISK FACTOR SUMMARY

        This Annual Report contains statements that constitute forward-looking statements. Many of the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report can be identified by the use of forward-looking words such as "anticipate," "believe," "could," "expect," "should," "plan," "intend," "will," "estimate" and "potential," among others.

        Forward-looking statements appear in a number of places in this Annual Report and include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our intent, belief or current expectations. Forward-looking statements are based on our management's beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to our management. Such statements are subject to risks and uncertainties, and actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements due to various factors, including, but not limited to, those identified under the section "Item 3. Key Information—D. Risk factors" in this Annual Report. These risks and uncertainties include factors relating to:

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        Our actual results or performance could differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, any forward-looking statements relating to those matters. Accordingly, no assurances can be given that any of the events anticipated by the forward-looking statements will transpire or occur, or if any of them do, what impact they will have on our results of operations, cash flows or financial condition. Additionally, some of the risks and uncertainties identified above may be amplified by the recent COVID-19 outbreak. It is not possible to predict or identify all such risks. There may be additional risks that we consider immaterial or which are unknown. Except as required by law, we are under no obligation, and expressly disclaim any obligation, to update, alter or otherwise revise any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

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PART I

ITEM 1.    IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

A.  Directors and senior management

        Not applicable.

B.  Advisers

        Not applicable.

C.  Auditors

        Not applicable.

ITEM 2.    OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

A.  Offer statistics

        Not applicable.

B.  Method and expected timetable

        Not applicable.

ITEM 3.    KEY INFORMATION

A.  [Reserved]

B.  Capitalization and indebtedness

        Not applicable.

C.  Reasons for the offer and use of proceeds

        Not applicable.

D.  Risk factors

        You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below and the other information in this Annual Report before making an investment in our common shares. Our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially and adversely affected if any of these risks occurs, and as a result, the market price of our common shares could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment. This Annual Report also contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. See "Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Risk Factor Summary." Our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors.

Risks Related to Our Business and the Development and Commercialization of Our Product Candidates

All of our product candidates are in preclinical or clinical development. Drug development is expensive, time consuming and uncertain, and we may ultimately not be able to obtain regulatory approvals for the commercialization of some or all of our product candidates.

        The research, testing, manufacturing, labeling, approval, selling, marketing and distribution of drug products are subject to extensive regulation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA,

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the European Medicines Agency, or EMA, national competent authorities in Europe, including the Paul-Ehrlich-Institute or PEI in Germany, and other non-U.S. regulatory authorities, which establish regulations that differ from country to country. We are not permitted to market our product candidates in the United States or in other countries until we receive approval of a Biologics License Application, or BLA, from the FDA or marketing approval from applicable regulatory authorities outside the United States. Our product candidates are in various stages of development and are subject to the risks of failure inherent in drug development. We have not submitted an application for or received marketing approval for any of our product candidates. We have limited experience in conducting and managing the clinical studies necessary to obtain regulatory approvals, including approval by the FDA or the European Commission. Obtaining approval of a BLA or a marketing authorization application can be a lengthy, expensive and uncertain process. In addition, failure to comply with FDA, EMA and other non-U.S. regulatory requirements may, either before or after product approval, if any, subject our company to administrative or judicially imposed sanctions, including:

    restrictions on our ability to conduct clinical studies, including full or partial clinical holds, or other regulatory objections to ongoing or planned trials;

    restrictions on the products, manufacturers, or manufacturing process;

    warning letters;

    civil and criminal penalties;

    injunctions;

    suspension or withdrawal of regulatory approvals;

    product seizures, detentions or import bans;

    voluntary or mandatory product recalls and publicity requirements;

    total or partial suspension of production;

    imposition of restrictions on operations, including costly new manufacturing requirements; and

    refusal to approve pending BLAs or supplements to approved BLAs in the United States and refusal to approve marketing authorization applications in other jurisdictions.

        The FDA, the EMA and other non-U.S. regulatory authorities also have substantial discretion in the drug approval process. The number of preclinical studies and clinical studies that will be required for regulatory approval varies depending on the product candidate, the disease or condition that the product candidate is designed to address, and the regulations applicable to any particular drug candidate. Regulatory agencies can delay, limit or deny approval of a product candidate for many reasons, including:

    a product candidate may not be deemed safe or effective;

    the results may not confirm the positive results from earlier preclinical studies or clinical studies;

    regulatory agencies may not find the data from preclinical studies and clinical studies sufficient or well-controlled;

    regulatory agencies might not approve or might require changes to our manufacturing processes or facilities; or

    regulatory agencies may change their approval policies or adopt new regulations.

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        For example, during the fourth quarter of 2018, the FDA concurred with our decision to place AFM11, a T cell-engaging bispecific antibody, on clinical hold after the occurrence of serious adverse events, or SAEs, in three patients, which included a death in the ALL study and two life-threatening events in the NHL study, and formally placed the AFM11 IND application on full clinical hold. We subsequently discontinued the development of AFM11. Any delay in obtaining or failure to obtain required approvals could materially adversely affect our ability to generate revenue from the particular product candidate, which likely would result in significant harm to our financial position and adversely impact our share price. Furthermore, any regulatory approval to market a product may be subject to limitations on the indicated uses for which we may market the product. These limitations may limit the size of the market for the product.

        In addition, even if regulatory approval is granted, pricing and reimbursement may not be achieved due to a multitude of factors, including formulary restrictions, health service providers not considering the benefit to patients of a new medicine to be sufficient to support reimbursement, as well as others.

Clinical drug development involves a lengthy and expensive process with uncertain timelines and uncertain outcomes, and results of earlier trials may not be predictive of future trial results. If clinical studies of our product candidates are prolonged or delayed, we may be unable to obtain required regulatory approvals, and therefore be unable to commercialize our product candidates on a timely basis or at all.

        We have no history of conducting large-scale or pivotal clinical studies or commercializing pharmaceutical products, which may make it difficult to evaluate the prospects for our future viability.

        Our operations to date have been limited to financing and staffing our company, developing our technology and developing AFM13, AFM24, AFM11 (prior to the termination of such program) and our other product candidates. We have not yet successfully demonstrated an ability to complete a large-scale or pivotal clinical study, obtain marketing approval, manufacture a commercial scale product or conduct sales and marketing activities necessary for successful product commercialization. Consequently, predictions about our future success or viability may not be as accurate as they could be if we had a history of successfully developing and commercializing pharmaceutical products.

        If clinical studies for our product candidates are prolonged, delayed or stopped, we may be unable to obtain regulatory approval and commercialize our product candidates on a timely basis, which would require us to incur additional costs and delay or restrict our receipt of any product revenue.

        There have been significant developments in the highly dynamic field of immuno-oncology such as the earlier availability of product candidates or earlier approval of drugs for the same indications as our product candidates, which led us to adapt our clinical programs accordingly. For example, in the past, the marketing authorization of Blincyto® (blinatumomab) in acute lymphocytic leukemia, or ALL, and of anti-PD-1 antibodies in Hodgkin Lymphoma, or HL, resulted in delays in clinical study initiation and/or patient recruitment for our phase 1 trials of AFM11 in ALL and NHL, and the phase 2a investigator-sponsored trial (IST) of AFM13 in HL. Certain clinical studies of our product candidates are sponsored by academic sites, which are known as investigator sponsored trials (ISTs). By definition, the financing, design, and conduct of such studies are under the responsibility of the academic site sponsor. Therefore, we have limited control over these studies and we do not have control over the timing and reporting of the data from these trials. In addition, we may have limited information about ISTs while they are being conducted, including the timing of planned trial initiation, the status of patient recruitment, changes to trial design, and clinical study results.

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        Following discussions with the FDA, we announced our registrational pathway and updated clinical development plans for AFM13 in the fourth quarter of 2018. And, following a lengthy review and approval process of a phase 2 clinical study protocol by the FDA in the first half of 2019, we initiated a phase 2 study in the fourth quarter of 2019 that is evaluating the efficacy and safety of AFM13 as monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory CD30 positive peripheral T cell lymphoma, or PTCL, or transformed mycosis fungoides (TMF), a subset of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). Importantly, while the study is ongoing, we have paused recruitment for the TMF cohort due to the impact of COVID-19. Of note, the TMF cohort was not part of the submission strategy for PTCL and thus the enrollment pause in the TMF cohort will will not impact the development in PTCL. Based on the unmet medical need for safe and effective new treatments in these hard-to-treat populations and preliminary feedback from the FDA during an end of phase 1 meeting held in the fourth quarter of 2018, we believe that results from our open-label, single-arm phase 2 study could form the basis for a BLA submission and support a potential accelerated approval for patients with relapsed or refractory CD30-positive PTCL.

        In addition, we have initiated a first-in-human phase 1/2a trial of AFM24, a first-in-class innate cell engager for various solid tumor indications. As we have only limited human data on AFM24 at this stage, we cannot assure you of its success. We have not previously tested our innate cell engagers in solid tumors in the clinical setting. The goals of the trial are to establish a dose for phase 2 testing as well as to evaluate the safety, tolerability and preliminary efficacy of AFM24 in patients with selected solid tumor subtypes. At this stage, we cannot assure you of its safety or tolerability, or of its ability to demonstrate efficacy in humans.

        The commencement of planned clinical studies could be substantially delayed or prevented by several factors, including:

    further discussions with the FDA, the EMA, the PEI (the national competent authority in Germany regulating, among others, antibody products) or other regulatory agencies regarding the scope or design of our clinical studies;

    the limited number of, and competition for, suitable sites to conduct our clinical studies, many of which may already be engaged in other clinical study programs, including some that may be for the same indication as our product candidates;

    approval of drugs for the same indications as our product candidates;

    any delay or failure to obtain regulatory approval or agreement to commence a clinical study in any of the countries where enrollment is planned;

    inability to obtain sufficient funds required for a clinical study;

    clinical holds on, or other regulatory objections to, a new or ongoing clinical study;

    delay or failure in the testing, validation, manufacture and delivery of sufficient supplies of product candidate for our clinical studies;

    delays related to the impact of COVID-19;

    delay or failure to reach agreement on acceptable clinical study agreement terms with prospective sites or clinical research organizations, or CROs, the terms of which can be subject to extensive negotiation and may vary significantly among different sites or CROs; and

    delay or failure to obtain institutional review board, or IRB, or ethics committee approval to conduct a clinical study at a prospective site.

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        The completion of our clinical studies has been and could in the future be substantially delayed or prevented by several factors, including:

    slower than expected rates of patient recruitment and enrollment, due to factors including, but not limited to, the availability of other drugs to treat potential patients, the unwillingness of patients to participate in low-dose groups of dose-ranging studies and lack of recruitment by clinical study sites;

    delays relating to adding new clinical study sites;

    failure of patients to complete the clinical study or return for post-treatment follow-up;

    failure of our collaborators to provide us with products necessary for us to conduct our combination studies;

    safety issues, including severe or unexpected drug-related adverse effects experienced by patients, including possible deaths;

    the FDA or other regulatory authorities requiring us to suspend or terminate a clinical study, or requiring us to submit additional data or imposing other requirements before permitting us to continue a clinical study;

    lack of efficacy during clinical studies;

    errors in trial design or conduct;

    termination of our clinical studies by one or more clinical study sites;

    inability or unwillingness of patients or clinical investigators to follow our clinical study protocols, including clinical investigators' failure to comply with our clinical study protocols without our notice;

    inability to monitor patients adequately during or after treatment by us and/or our CROs; and

    the need to repeat or terminate clinical studies as a result of inconclusive or negative results or unforeseen complications in testing.

        For example, in our clinical studies for AFM13 and AFM24, infusion related reactions (IRRs) have been a commonly observed treatment-related side effect, in some cases serious. In our Phase 1b study evaluating the combination of AFM13 with pembrolizumab, IRRs related to AFM13 were observed in 27 of 30 patients, or 90%, and IRRs of grade 3 or greater were observed in four patients. IRRs were also observed in our ongoing Phase 2 study evaluating AFM13 for the treatment of relapsed / refractory PTCL. While these IRRs have generally been well managed with pre-medication and interventional treatments, the incidence of IRRs has occasionally led to dose reductions and/or patients discontinuing their participation in our clinical trials. As we increase the number of clinical trials for our ICE® molecules and study them against new tumor targets, there can be no assurance that IRRs or other side effects will not cause delays or termination of our future clinical studies or development plans.

        Changes in regulatory requirements and guidance may also occur and we may need to significantly amend clinical study protocols or submit new clinical study protocols to reflect these changes with the appropriate regulatory authorities. In addition, changes in the competitive environment have occurred and may continue to occur.

        Amendments may require us to renegotiate terms with CROs or resubmit clinical study protocols to IRBs or ethics committees for re-examination, which may impact the costs, timing or successful completion of a clinical study.

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        Our clinical studies may be suspended or terminated at any time by the FDA, the PEI, other regulatory authorities, the IRBs or ethics committees overseeing the clinical study at issue, any of our clinical study sites, or us, due to a number of factors, including:

    failure to conduct the clinical study in accordance with regulatory requirements or our clinical protocols;

    safety issues or any determination that a clinical study presents unacceptable health risks;

    lack of adequate funding to continue the clinical study due to unforeseen costs or other business decisions;

    upon a breach or pursuant to the terms of any agreement with, or for any other reason by, current or future collaborators that have responsibility for the clinical development of any of our product candidates; and

    availability of a new effective treatment for the respective disease or condition that would be considered to be standard of care by regulatory bodies.

        For example, during the fourth quarter of 2018, we placed AFM11, a T cell-engaging bispecific antibody, on clinical hold after the occurrence of SAEs in three patients, which included a death in the ALL study and two life-threatening events in the NHL study. The SAEs occurred in patients enrolled in the highest dose cohorts of each study. Subsequently, we received a formal notification from the FDA that the regulatory agency has concurred with our decision to stop recruitment and formally placed the AFM11 IND application on full clinical hold. In May 2019, we received notification from the FDA that additional data would be needed to determine whether the AFM11 clinical hold could be lifted. In line with the strategic focus on our innate immunity portfolio, we made the decision to terminate the phase 1 clinical programs of AFM11. The Company took into consideration the competitive landscape of B-cell directed therapies currently in development and associated resources needed for further development of AFM11. We informed the FDA of our intention to terminate the AFM11 clinical program in its entirety.

        Our product development costs will increase if we experience delays in clinical studies or marketing approvals or if we are required to conduct additional clinical studies or other testing of our product candidates. We may be required to obtain additional funding to conduct and complete such clinical studies. We cannot assure you that our clinical studies will begin as planned or be completed on schedule, if at all, or that we will not need to restructure our trials after they have begun. Significant clinical study delays also could shorten any periods during which we may have the exclusive right to commercialize our product candidates or allow our competitors to bring products to market before we do, which may harm our business and results of operations.

        Any failure or significant delay in completing clinical studies for our product candidates would adversely affect our ability to obtain regulatory approval and our commercial prospects and ability to generate product revenue will be diminished.

The results of previous clinical studies may not be predictive of future results, our progress in trials for one product candidate may not be indicative of progress in trials for other product candidates and the results of our current and planned clinical studies may not satisfy the requirements of the FDA, the EMA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities.

        We currently have no products approved for sale and we cannot guarantee that we will ever have marketable products. Clinical failure can occur at any stage of clinical development. Clinical studies may produce negative or inconclusive results, and we or any of our current and future collaborators may decide, or regulators may require us, to conduct additional clinical or preclinical testing. We will be required to demonstrate with substantial evidence through well-controlled clinical

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studies that our product candidates are safe and effective for use in a diverse population before we can seek regulatory approvals for their commercial sale. Success in early clinical trials does not mean that future larger registration clinical studies will be successful, because product candidates in later-stage clinical studies may fail to demonstrate sufficient safety and efficacy to the satisfaction of the FDA and non-U.S. regulatory authorities despite having progressed through initial clinical studies. Product candidates that have shown promising results in early clinical studies may still suffer significant setbacks in subsequent registration clinical studies. Similarly, the outcome of preclinical testing and early clinical studies may not be predictive of the success of later clinical studies, and interim results of a clinical study do not necessarily predict final results. Progress in trials of one product candidate does not indicate that we will make similar progress in additional trials for that product candidate or in trials for our other product candidates. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical industry, including those with greater resources and experience than us, have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical studies, even after obtaining promising results in earlier clinical studies.

        In addition, the design of a clinical study can determine whether its results will support approval of a product and flaws in the design of a clinical study may not become apparent until the clinical study is well advanced. We may be unable to design and execute a clinical study to support regulatory approval.

        In some instances, there can be significant variability in safety and/or efficacy results between different trials of the same product candidate due to numerous factors, including changes in trial protocols, differences in size and type of the patient populations, adherence to the dosing regimen and other trial protocols and the rate of dropout among clinical study participants. We do not know whether any phase 2, phase 3 or other clinical studies we or any of our collaborators may conduct will demonstrate consistent or adequate efficacy and safety to obtain regulatory approval to market our product candidates.

        Further, our product candidates may not be approved even if they achieve their primary endpoints in phase 3 clinical studies or registration trials. The FDA, the EMA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may disagree with our trial design and our interpretation of data from preclinical and clinical studies. In addition, any of these regulatory authorities may change requirements for the approval of a product candidate even after reviewing and providing comments or advice on a protocol for a clinical study. In addition, any of these regulatory authorities may also approve a product candidate for fewer or more limited indications than we request or may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly post-marketing clinical studies. The FDA, the EMA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may not accept the labeling claims that we believe would be necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of our product candidates.

We depend on enrollment of patients in our clinical studies for our product candidates. We compete with other sponsors who have ongoing clinical studies of investigational therapies for patients for our clinical studies. If we are unable to enroll patients in our clinical studies, our research and development efforts could be materially adversely affected.

        Successful and timely completion of clinical studies will require that we enroll a sufficient number of patients. Trials may be subject to delays as a result of patient enrollment taking longer than anticipated. Patient enrollment depends on many factors, including the size and nature of the patient population, eligibility criteria for the trial, the proximity of patients to clinical sites, the design of the clinical protocol, the availability of competing clinical studies, the availability of new drugs approved for the indication the clinical study is investigating, and clinicians' and patients' perceptions as to the potential advantages of the drug being studied in relation to other available therapies. In addition, we compete with approved immunotherapies and investigational immunotherapies for patients for our clinical studies. Our product candidate AFM13 has orphan drug designation for the

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treatment of HL, from FDA and EMA, and for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma from the FDA, which means that the potential patient population is limited. As we are developing AFM13 and certain of our other product candidates for patients for whom previous therapies have failed and who may not have long to live, patients may elect not to participate in our, or any, clinical study.

        The approval of new immuno-oncology drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs) has changed the landscape for conducting clinical studies of other oncology drugs, including ours, both for indications for which such drugs are approved as well as for indications in which additional trials are being conducted. In addition, there are several other types of drugs in development for the indications for which we are developing AFM13 and certain of our other product candidates. We compete for patients with the sponsors of trials for all of these drugs. These factors may make it difficult for us to enroll enough patients to complete our clinical studies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

        For example, although the GHSG, phase 2a clinical study of AFM13 in patients with HL started recruitment in the second quarter of 2015, the study experienced slower recruitment than anticipated due to the availability of anti-PD-1 antibodies for the treatment of relapsed/refractory HL patients. Further delays in the completion of any clinical study of our product candidates will increase our costs, prolong our product candidate development and approval process and delay or potentially jeopardize our ability to commence product sales and generate revenue. In addition, some of the factors that cause, or lead to, a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical studies may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of our product candidates.

COVID-19 has adversely impacted and could continue to impact our business, including our supply chain, clinical trials and operations.

        The recent outbreak of COVID-19 has evolved from a regional epidemic to a global pandemic, impacting almost every corner of the globe. The continued spread of COVID-19 is adversely impacting clinical and preclinical trials globally and in different therapeutic areas. As a result, our clinical trials or preclinical studies, including our ability to recruit and retain patients, principal investigators and site staff who, as healthcare providers, may have heightened exposure to COVID-19, may be significantly impacted. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are implementing mitigation procedures designed to enable us to address the various issues that may arise from the COVID-19 pandemic, although there can be no assurance that these procedures will be successful or that we can avoid a material and adverse disruption to our business. As the pandemic continues, we may experience the prioritization of hospital resources toward the outbreak and further restrictions on travel. Furthermore, some patients may be unwilling to enroll in our trials or be unable to comply with clinical trial protocols if quarantines or travel restrictions impede patient movement or interrupt healthcare services. For example, although we are continuing to enroll patients in our phase 2 study of AFM13 as monotherapy in relapsed or refractory patients suffering from peripheral T cell lymphoma, we have paused enrolment in an exploratory cohort intended to investigate the initial efficacy of AFM13 as monotherapy in patients suffering from transformed mycosis fungoides (T-MF) given the challenges presented by the ongoing pandemic.

        COVID-19 may also negatively affect the operations of third-party contract research organizations that we rely upon to carry out our clinical trials or the operations of our third-party manufacturers, each of which could result in delays or disruptions in the supply of our product candidates. The negative impact COVID-19 has had and may continue to have on patient enrollment and treatment, and the timing and execution of our clinical trials could cause costly delays to our clinical trial activities, which could adversely affect our ability to obtain regulatory approval for and to advance towards commercialization, increase operating expenses and have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results.

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        In addition, COVID-19 has resulted in significant governmental measures being implemented to control the spread of the virus. Public health officials have recommended and mandated precautions to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, including prohibitions on congregating, traveling across borders, shelter-in-place orders and other similar measures. We have taken precautionary measures intended to help minimize the risk of the virus to our employees, including temporarily requiring some or all of our employees to work remotely, suspending all non-essential travel and discouraging employee attendance at industry events and in-person work-related meetings. Such measures could negatively affect our business. For instance, temporarily requiring employees to work remotely may disrupt our operations or create unforeseen issues related to the use of technology designed to allow for remote communication and collaboration. The COVID-19 pandemic has also caused volatility in the global financial markets and has threatened a slowdown in the global economy, which may negatively affect our ability to raise additional capital on attractive terms or at all.

        The full extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic may impact our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted at this time. As such, we cannot presently predict the scope and severity of any potential business shutdowns or disruptions, the impacts on our business, financing or clinical trial activities or on the healthcare system and the global economy as a whole.

We use new technologies in the development of our product candidates and the FDA and other regulatory authorities have not approved products that utilize these technologies.

        Our innate cell engager product candidates in development are based on our fit-for-purpose ROCK® ("Redirected Optimized Cell Killing") platform and are capable of recruiting NK cells and / or macrophages. Regulatory approval of our product candidates is less certain than the approval of drugs that do not employ such novel technologies or methods of action. We intend to work closely with the FDA, the EMA and other regulatory authorities to perform the requisite scientific analyses and evaluation of our methods to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates. For example, final assays and specifications of our product candidates have yet to be developed, and the FDA, EMA or other regulatory authorities may require additional analyses to evaluate different aspects of our product quality. It is possible that the validation process may take time and resources, may require independent third-party analyses, or may not be accepted by the FDA, the EMA or other regulatory authorities. Delays or failure to obtain regulatory approval of any of the product candidates that we are developing would adversely affect our business.

Even if our product candidates obtain regulatory approval, they will be subject to continuous regulatory review.

        If marketing authorization is obtained for any of our product candidates, the product will remain subject to continuous review and therefore authorization could be subsequently withdrawn or restricted. We will be subject to ongoing obligations and oversight by regulatory authorities, including adverse event reporting requirements, marketing restrictions and, potentially, other post-marketing obligations, all of which may result in significant expense and limit our ability to commercialize such products.

        If there are changes in the application of legislation or regulatory policies, or if problems are discovered with a product or our manufacture of a product, or if we or one of our distributors, licensees or co-marketers fails to comply with regulatory requirements, the regulators could take various actions. These include imposing fines on us, imposing restrictions on the product or its manufacture and requiring us to recall or remove the product from the market. The regulators could also suspend or withdraw our marketing authorizations, requiring us to conduct additional clinical studies, change our product labeling or submit additional applications for marketing authorization. If any of these events occurs, our ability to sell such product may be impaired, and we may incur

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substantial additional expense to comply with regulatory requirements, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be successful in our efforts to use and expand our technology platforms to build a pipeline of product candidates.

        A key element of our strategy is to use and expand our technology platforms to build a pipeline of product candidates and progress these product candidates through clinical development for the treatment of a variety of different types of diseases. Although our research and development efforts to date have resulted in a pipeline of product candidates directed at various cancers, we may not be able to develop product candidates that are safe and effective. Even if we are successful in continuing to build our pipeline, the potential product candidates that we identify may not be suitable for clinical development, including as a result of being shown to have harmful side effects or other characteristics that indicate that they are unlikely to be products that will receive marketing approval and achieve market acceptance. If we do not continue to successfully develop and begin to commercialize product candidates, we will face difficulty in obtaining product revenues in future periods, which could result in significant harm to our financial position and adversely affect our share price.

Even if we obtain marketing approval of any of our product candidates in a major pharmaceutical market such as the United States or Europe, we may never obtain approval or commercialize our products in other major markets, which would limit our ability to realize their full market potential.

        In order to market any products in a country or territory, we must establish and comply with numerous and varying regulatory requirements of such countries or territories regarding safety and efficacy. Clinical studies conducted in one country may not be accepted by regulatory authorities in other countries, and regulatory approval in one country does not mean that regulatory approval will be obtained in any other country. Approval procedures vary among countries and can involve additional product testing and validation and additional administrative review periods. Seeking regulatory approvals in all major markets could result in significant delays, difficulties and costs for us and may require additional preclinical studies or clinical studies which would be costly and time consuming. Regulatory requirements can vary widely from country to country and could delay or prevent the introduction of our products in those countries. Satisfying these and other regulatory requirements is costly, time consuming, uncertain and subject to unanticipated delays. In addition, our failure to obtain regulatory approval in any country may delay or have negative effects on the process for regulatory approval in other countries. We do not have any product candidates approved for sale in any jurisdiction, including international markets, and we do not have experience in obtaining regulatory approval in international markets. If we fail to comply with regulatory requirements in international markets or to obtain and maintain required approvals, our target market will be reduced and our ability to realize the full market potential of our products will be harmed.

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In the United States, we may seek fast track designation of AFM13 and certain of our other product candidates, with the intent to pursue an accelerated approval pathway and potentially, breakthrough designation of AFM13 and/or certain of our other product candidates. There is no assurance that the FDA will grant such designations; and, even if it does grant such designations to AFM13 and/or certain of our other product candidates, such designation may not actually lead to a faster development or regulatory review or approval process and does not increase the likelihood that our product candidates will receive marketing approval in the United States.

        Based on clinical data, either from ongoing or new clinical studies, we plan to seek fast track designation of AFM13 as a monotherapy and/or as a combination in relevant indications. In addition, we may seek fast track designation of certain of our other product candidates. The fast track program, a provision of the FDA Modernization Act of 1997, is designed to facilitate interactions between a sponsoring company and the FDA before and during submission of a BLA for an investigational agent that, alone or in combination with one or more other drugs, is intended to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition, and which demonstrates the potential to address an unmet medical need for that disease or condition. Under the fast track program, the FDA may consider reviewing portions of a marketing application before the sponsor submits the complete application if the FDA determines, after a preliminary evaluation of the clinical data, that a product that has been granted fast track designation may be effective. A fast track designation provides the opportunity for more frequent interactions with the FDA, and a product that has been granted fast track designation could be eligible for priority review if supported by clinical data at the time of submission of the BLA.

        The FDA is authorized to designate a product candidate as a breakthrough therapy if it finds that the product is intended, alone or in combination with one or more other drugs, to treat a serious or life-threatening disease or condition and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the product may demonstrate substantial improvement over existing therapies on one or more clinically significant endpoints, such as substantial treatment effects observed early in clinical development. For products designated as breakthrough therapies, interaction and communication between the FDA and the sponsor of the trial can help to identify the most efficient path for clinical development while minimizing the number of patients placed in ineffective control regimens. Products designated as breakthrough therapies by the FDA can also be eligible for accelerated approval if the relevant criteria are met.

        The FDA has broad discretion whether or not to grant fast track or breakthrough designation. Accordingly, even if we believe one of our product candidates meets the criteria for fast track or breakthrough designation, the FDA may disagree and instead determine not to make such designation. In any event, the receipt of fast-track or breakthrough therapy designation for a product candidate may not result in a faster development process, review or approval compared to product candidates considered for approval under conventional FDA procedures and, in any event, does not assure ultimate approval by the FDA. In addition, even if one or more of our product candidates qualify as fast track or breakthrough therapies, the FDA may later decide that the product candidates no longer meet the conditions for qualification or decide that the time period for FDA review or approval will not be shortened.

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We may be unable to obtain orphan product designation or exclusivity for some of our product candidates. If our competitors are able to obtain orphan product exclusivity for their products in the same indications for which we are developing our product candidates, we may not be able to have our products approved by the applicable regulatory authority for a significant period of time. Conversely, if we obtain orphan drug exclusivity for some of our product candidates, we may not be able to benefit from the associated marketing exclusivity.

        Regulatory authorities in some jurisdictions, including the United States and Europe, may designate drugs for relatively small patient populations as orphan drugs. Under the Orphan Drug Act, the FDA may designate a product candidate as an orphan drug if it is a drug intended to treat a rare disease or condition, which is generally defined as a patient population of fewer than 200,000 individuals annually in the United States. In the European Union, or the EU, the European Commission may designate a product candidate as an orphan medicinal product if it is a medicine for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of life-threatening or very serious conditions that affect not more than five in 10,000 persons in the European Union, or it is unlikely that marketing of the medicine would generate sufficient returns to justify the investment needed for its development. We have received orphan drug designation for AFM13 for the treatment of HL in the United States and Europe, and for T-cell lymphoma in the United States; but orphan drug status does not ensure that we will have market exclusivity in a particular market and there is no assurance we will be able to receive orphan drug designation for certain of our other product candidates or any additional product candidates. Further, the granting of a request for orphan drug designation does not alter the standard regulatory requirements and process for obtaining marketing approval.

        Generally, if a product candidate with an orphan drug designation receives the first marketing approval for the indication for which it has such designation, the product is entitled to a period of marketing exclusivity, which, subject to certain exceptions, precludes the FDA from approving the marketing application of the same drug from another sponsor for the same indication for that time period or precludes the EMA, and other national drug regulators in the EU, from accepting the marketing application for a similar product from another sponsor for the same indication. The applicable period is seven years in the United States and ten years in the European Union. The EU period can be reduced to six years if a product no longer meets the criteria for orphan drug designation or if the product is sufficiently profitable so that market exclusivity is no longer justified. In the EU, orphan exclusivity may also be extended for an additional two years (i.e. , a maximum of 12 years' orphan exclusivity) if the product is approved on the basis of a dossier that includes pediatric clinical study data generated in accordance with an approved pediatric investigation plan. Orphan drug exclusivity may be lost in the United States if the FDA determines that the request for designation was materially defective or if the manufacturer is unable to assure sufficient quantity of the product to meet the needs of patients with the rare disease or condition.

        Even if we obtain orphan drug exclusivity for one or more of our products that exclusivity may not effectively protect the product from competition because exclusivity can be suspended under certain circumstances. In the United States, even after an orphan drug is approved, the FDA can subsequently approve another drug with the same active moiety for the same condition if the FDA concludes that the later drug is clinically superior in that it is shown to be safer, more effective or makes a major contribution to patient care. In the European Union, orphan exclusivity will not prevent a marketing authorization being granted for a similar medicinal product in the same indication if the new product is safer, more effective or otherwise clinically superior to the first product or if the marketing authorization holder of the first product is unable to supply sufficient quantities of the product.

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Our product candidates may result in serious adverse, undesirable or unacceptable side effects which may delay or prevent marketing approval. If such side effects are identified during the development of our product candidates or following approval, if any, we may need to abandon our development of such product candidates, the commercial profile of any approved label may be limited, or we may be subject to other significant negative consequences following marketing approval, if any.

        Although all of our product candidates have undergone or will undergo safety testing to the extent possible and agreed with health authorities, not all adverse effects of drugs can be predicted or anticipated. Immunotherapy and its method of action of harnessing the body's immune system, especially with respect to immune cell engagers, is powerful and could lead to serious side effects that we only discover in clinical studies. Unforeseen side effects from any of our product candidates could arise either during clinical development or, if such side effects are rarer, after our product candidates have been approved by regulatory authorities and the approved product has been marketed, resulting in the exposure of additional patients. All of our product candidates are still in clinical or preclinical development. While our phase 1 clinical studies for AFM13 demonstrated a favorable safety profile, the results from ongoing and future trials of AFM13 or other NK cell-engaging bispecific antibodies may not confirm these results. The most frequently observed adverse event for AFM13 is infusion related reactions (IRRs), in some cases serious. In our Phase 1b study evaluating the combination of AFM13 with pembrolizumab, IRRs related to AFM13 were observed in 27 of 30 patients, or 90%, and IRRs of grade 3 or greater were observed in four patients. IRRs were also observed in our ongoing Phase 2 study evaluating AFM13 for the treatment of relapsed / refractory PTCL. While these IRRs have generally been well managed with pre-medication and interventional treatments, the incidence of IRRs has occasionally led to dose reductions and/or patients discontinuing their participation in our clinical trials. As we increase the number of clinical trials for our ICE® molecules and study them against new tumor targets, there can be no assurance that IRRs or other side effects will not cause delays or termination of our future clinical studies or development plans.

        During the fourth quarter of 2018, we placed AFM11, a T cell-engaging bispecific antibody, on clinical hold after the occurrence of SAEs in three patients, which included a death in the ALL study and two life-threatening events in the NHL study. The SAEs occurred in patients enrolled in the highest dose cohorts of each study. Subsequently, we received a formal notification from the FDA that the regulatory agency has concurred with our decision to stop recruitment and formally placed the AFM11 IND application on full clinical hold. In early March 2019, we submitted a complete response document to the FDA that summarizes the clinical data from the two AFM11 phase 1 studies to request that the clinical hold be lifted so that clinical development of AFM11 may proceed in ALL patients. In May 2019, we received notification from the FDA that additional data would be needed to determine whether the AFM11 clinical hold could be lifted. In line with the strategic focus on our innate immunity portfolio, we made the decision to terminate the phase 1 clinical programs of AFM11. The Company took into consideration the competitive landscape of B-cell directed therapies currently in development and associated resources needed for further development of AFM11. We informed the FDA of our intention to terminate the AFM11 clinical program in its entirety.

        We are developing our AFM13 product candidate for patients with relapsed or refractory HL and other CD30+ lymphomas, and AFM24 for patients with EGFR+ solid tumor indications, for which other therapies have limited benefit and survival times may be short. Therefore, we expect that certain patients may die during the clinical studies of our product candidates, and it may be difficult to ascertain whether such deaths are attributable to the underlying disease, complications from the disease, our product candidate, or a combination thereof.

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        The results of ongoing and future clinical studies may show that our product candidates cause undesirable or unacceptable side effects, which could interrupt, delay or halt clinical studies, and result in the delay of, or failure to obtain, marketing approval from the FDA, the European Commission and other regulatory authorities, or result in marketing approval from the FDA, the European Commission and other regulatory authorities with restrictive label warnings or potential product liability claims. Treatment-related side effects could also affect patient recruitment or the ability of enrolled subjects to complete the study, or make the product candidate less attractive for partnering. In addition, these side effects may not be appropriately recognized or managed by the treating medical staff, particularly outside of our existing or future collaborators as toxicities resulting from cancer immunotherapies are not normally encountered in the general patient population and by medical personnel. The inability to recognize and manage the potential side effects of our product candidates could result in patient deaths. Any of these occurrences may prevent us from achieving or maintaining market acceptance of the affected product candidate and may harm our business, financial condition and prospects significantly.

        Additionally, if any of our product candidates receives marketing approval and we or others later identify undesirable or unacceptable side effects caused by such products:

    regulatory authorities may require us to take our approved product off the market;

    regulatory authorities may require the addition of labeling statements, specific warnings, a contraindication or field alerts to physicians and pharmacies;

    we may be required to change the way the product is administered, conduct additional clinical studies or change the labeling of the product;

    we may be subject to limitations on how we may promote the product;

    sales of the product may decrease significantly;

    we may be subject to litigation or product liability claims; and

    our reputation may suffer.

        Any of these events could prevent us, our collaborators or our potential future partners from achieving or maintaining market acceptance of the affected product or could substantially increase commercialization costs and expenses, which in turn could delay or prevent us from generating significant revenue from the sale of our products.

Adverse events in the field of immuno-oncology could damage public perception of our product candidates and negatively affect our business.

        The commercial success of our products will depend in part on public acceptance of the use of cancer immunotherapies. SAEs and other adverse events in clinical studies of our product candidates or in clinical studies of others developing similar products and the resulting publicity, as well as any other adverse events in the field of immuno-oncology that may occur in the future, could result in a decrease in demand for any products that we may develop. Although the mode of action of our innate cell engagers differs from that of other immuno-oncology approaches in development, the public may not always differentiate between our therapies and others in the field. If public perception is influenced by claims that the use of cancer immunotherapies is unsafe, our products may not be accepted by the general public or the medical community.

        Future adverse events in immuno-oncology or the biopharmaceutical industry could also result in greater governmental regulation, stricter labeling requirements and potential regulatory delays in the testing or approval of our products. Any increased scrutiny could delay or increase the costs of obtaining regulatory approval for our product candidates.

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Even if approved, if any of our product candidates do not achieve broad market acceptance among physicians, patients, the medical community and third-party payors, our revenue generated from their sales will be limited.

        The commercial success of our product candidates will depend upon their acceptance among physicians, patients and the medical community. The degree of market acceptance of our product candidates will depend on a number of factors, including:

    limitations or warnings contained in the approved labeling for a product candidate;

    changes in the standard of care for the targeted indications for any of our product candidates;

    limitations in the approved clinical indications for our product candidates;

    demonstrated clinical safety and efficacy compared to other products;

    lack of significant adverse side effects;

    sales, marketing and distribution support;

    availability and extent of reimbursement from managed care plans and other third-party payors;

    timing of market introduction and perceived effectiveness of competitive products;

    the degree of cost-effectiveness of our product candidates;

    availability of alternative therapies at similar or lower cost, including generic and over-the-counter products;

    the extent to which the product candidate is approved for inclusion on formularies of hospitals and managed care organizations;

    whether the product is designated under physician treatment guidelines as a first-line, second-line, third-line, or subsequent line of therapy for particular diseases;

    adverse publicity about our product candidates or favorable publicity about competitive products;

    convenience and ease of administration of our products; and

    potential product liability claims.

        If any of our product candidates are approved, but do not achieve an adequate level of acceptance by physicians, patients and the medical community, we may not generate sufficient revenue from these products, and we may not become or remain profitable. In addition, efforts to educate the medical community and third-party payors on the benefits of our product candidates may require significant resources and may never be successful.

We are subject to manufacturing risks that could substantially increase our costs and limit supply of our product or prevent us from achieving a commercially viable production process.

        The process of manufacturing our products is complex, highly regulated and subject to several risks, including:

    We do not have experience in manufacturing our product candidates at commercial scale. We contract with external manufacturers to develop a larger scale manufacturing process for AFM13 in order to have material supply available for the registration directed phase 2b trial. We may not succeed in scaling up the process to commercial scale. We may need a larger

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      scale manufacturing process for certain of our product candidates than what we have planned, depending on the dose and regimen. Any changes in our manufacturing processes as a result of scaling up may result in the need to obtain additional regulatory approvals. Difficulties in achieving commercial-scale production or the need for additional regulatory approvals as a result of scaling up could delay the development and regulatory approval of our product candidates and ultimately affect our success.

    We may not achieve the manufacturing productivity, or yield, required to achieve a commercially viable cost of goods. Our molecules are novel antibody structures and there is very limited knowledge as to which productivities can be achieved at commercial scale. Low productivity may result in a cost of goods which is too high to allow profitable commercialization, or give rise to the need for additional manufacturing process optimization which would require additional funding and time.

    The process of manufacturing biologics, such as AFM13, AFM24, certain of our other product candidates and the NK cells we use for our combination studies, is susceptible to product loss due to contamination, improper storage or shipping conditions, equipment failure or improper installation or operation of equipment, vendor or operator error, and difficulties in scaling up the production process. Even minor deviations from normal manufacturing processes could result in reduced production yields, product defects and other supply disruptions. If microbial, viral or other contaminations are discovered in our product candidates or in the manufacturing facilities in which our product candidates are made, such manufacturing facilities may need to be closed for an extended period to investigate and remedy the contamination.

    The manufacturing facilities in which our product candidates are made could be adversely affected by equipment failures, labor shortages, natural disasters, health epidemics, power failures and numerous other factors.

    We must comply with applicable current Good Manufacturing Practice, or cGMP, regulations and guidelines. We may encounter difficulties in achieving quality control and quality assurance and may experience shortages in qualified personnel. We are subject to inspections by the FDA and comparable agencies in other jurisdictions to confirm compliance with applicable regulatory requirements. Any failure to follow cGMP or other regulatory requirements or delay, interruption or other issues that arise in the manufacture, fill-finish, packaging, or storage of our product candidates as a result of a failure of our facilities or the facilities or operations of third parties to comply with regulatory requirements or pass any regulatory authority inspection could significantly impair our ability to develop and commercialize our product candidates, leading to significant delays in the availability of drug product for our clinical studies or the termination or hold on a clinical study, or the delay or prevention of a filing or approval of marketing applications for our product candidates. Significant noncompliance could also result in the imposition of sanctions, including fines, injunctions, civil penalties, failure of regulatory authorities to grant marketing approvals for our product candidates, delays, suspension or withdrawal of approvals, license revocation, seizures or recalls of products, operating restrictions and criminal prosecutions, any of which could damage our reputation. If we are not able to maintain regulatory compliance, we may not be permitted to market our product candidates and/or may be subject to product recalls, seizures, injunctions, or criminal prosecution.

    Any adverse developments affecting manufacturing operations for our product candidates, if any are approved, may result in shipment delays, inventory shortages, lot failures, product withdrawals or recalls, or other interruptions in the supply of our products. We may also have to take inventory write-offs and incur other charges and expenses for products that fail to

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      meet specifications, undertake costly remediation efforts or seek more costly manufacturing alternatives.

    Our product candidates that have been produced and are stored for later use may degrade, become contaminated or suffer other quality defects, which may cause the affected product candidates to no longer be suitable for their intended use in clinical studies or other development activities. If the defective product candidates cannot be replaced in a timely fashion, we may incur significant delays in our development programs that could adversely affect the value of such product candidates.

We currently have no marketing, sales or distribution infrastructure. If we are unable to develop sales, marketing and distribution capabilities on our own or through collaborations, or if we fail to achieve adequate pricing and/or reimbursement we will not be successful in commercializing our product candidates.

        We currently have no marketing, sales and distribution capabilities because our lead product candidates are still in clinical development. If any of our product candidates are approved, we intend either to establish a sales and marketing organization with technical expertise and supporting distribution capabilities to commercialize our product candidates, or to outsource this function to a third party. Either of these options would be expensive and time consuming. These costs may be incurred in advance of any approval of our product candidates. In addition, we may not be able to hire a sales force that is sufficient in size or has adequate expertise in the medical markets that we intend to target. Any failure or delay in the development of our internal sales, marketing and distribution capabilities would adversely impact the commercialization of our products.

        To the extent that we enter into collaboration agreements with respect to marketing, sales or distribution, our product revenue may be lower than if we directly marketed or sold any approved products. In addition, any revenue we receive will depend in whole or in part upon the efforts of these third-party collaborators, which may not be successful and are generally not within our control. If we are unable to enter into these arrangements on acceptable terms or at all, we may not be able to successfully commercialize any approved products. If we are not successful in commercializing any approved products, either on our own or through collaborations with one or more third parties, our future product revenue will suffer and we may incur significant additional losses.

        We may not be able to achieve the prices for our products that we may need for sustained profitability. In particular, there are different and changing reimbursement regulations in major market countries and other countries, and we might not be able to show the specific benefit or other requirements required for reimbursement or reimbursement at a specified pricing level in one or more jurisdictions.

        In addition, if we successfully develop combinations of our product candidates with other potentially expensive agents, the market may not allow premium pricing of our products and hence may impair our ability to achieve profitability.

We face significant competition and if our competitors develop and market products that are more effective, safer or less expensive than our product candidates, our commercial opportunities will be negatively impacted.

        The life sciences industry is highly competitive and subject to rapid and significant technological change. We are currently developing therapeutics that will compete with other drugs and therapies that currently exist or are being developed. Products we may develop in the future are also likely to face competition from other drugs and therapies, some of which we may not currently be aware. We have competitors both in the United States and internationally, including major multinational pharmaceutical companies, established biotechnology companies, specialty pharmaceutical

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companies, universities and other research institutions. Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, manufacturing, marketing, drug development, technical and human resources than we do. Large pharmaceutical companies, in particular, have extensive experience in clinical testing, obtaining regulatory approvals, recruiting patients and in manufacturing pharmaceutical products. These companies also have significantly greater research and marketing capabilities than we do and may also have products that have been approved or are in late stages of development, and collaborative arrangements in our target markets with leading companies and research institutions. Established pharmaceutical companies may also invest heavily to accelerate discovery and development of novel compounds or to in-license novel compounds that could make the product candidates that we develop obsolete. As a result of all of these factors, our competitors may succeed in discovering, developing, obtaining patent protection, marketing approval and commercialize products in our field before we do.

        There are many companies developing or marketing treatments for cancer disorders, including many major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. These treatments consist of small molecule drug products, biologic therapeutics that work either by using next-generation antibody technology platforms or new immunological approaches to address specific cancer targets, as well as genetically engineered cellular therapeutics. These treatments are often combined with one another in an attempt to maximize the response rate. In addition, several companies are developing therapeutics that work by targeting multiple specificities using a single recombinant molecule, as we are.

        Clinical phase 2 data with the anti-PD-1 CPIs nivolumab and pembrolizumab in HL have been published. These data indicate that treatment with anti-PD-1 antibodies results in high response rates in the salvage setting of HL. In 2016, the FDA granted accelerated approval, and the European Commission granted approval for nivolumab in classical HL patients who have relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®). In 2017, the FDA granted accelerated approval, and the European Commission granted approval for pembrolizumab in adult and pediatric patients with refractory cHL who have relapsed after 3 or more prior lines of therapy, and the European Commission granted approval for pembrolizumab in adult patients with relapsed or refractory cHL who have failed autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) and brentuximab vedotin, or who are transplant-ineligible and have failed brentuximab vedotin. Phase 2 and phase 3 studies of brentuximab vedotin in combination with nivolumab are ongoing. If AFM13 were to be approved for HL, we could be in competition with these therapies, as well as any other therapies or combination regimens that comprise the standard of care that AFM13 could potentially displace. Several other agents have reached proof of concept clinical studies in HL, including Afinitor (Novartis AG), and lenalidomide (Bristol Myers Squibb).

        Bretuximab vedotin, or Adcetris®, an antibody-drug conjugate targeting CD30, was approved by the FDA in relapsed/refractory HL in 2011. In addition, Adcetris® was approved by the FDA in 2018 for the treatment of previously untreated Stage 3/4 cHL in combination with chemotherapy. In the European Union, Adcetris® is approved for similar indications. Adcetris® is also indicated for previously treated systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), primary cutaneous ALCL, and CD30 positive mycosis fungoides, as well as for previously untreated systemic ALCL or other CD30 positive peripheral T-cell lymphomas in combination with chemotherapy in the US and for previously untreated systemic ALCL in Europe. Adcetris® is currently being investigated in various combinations in HL, including checkpoint inhibitors.

        We expect that our ROCK® platform as well as our novel antibody formats derived from this platform will serve as the basis for future product candidates and collaborations with pharmaceutical companies. Other companies have also developed platform technologies that compete with our platforms. For example, Dragonfly Therapeutics is developing TriNKET, which specifically activates cells of the innate and adaptive immune system and has recently started clinical development of one

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of these TriNKET assets. GT Biopharma is developing its TriKEs and TetraKEs platform designed to target natural killer cells and tumor cells forming an immune synapse between the NK cell and the tumor cell thereby inducing NK cell activation at that site, and recently started its clinical development. Compass Therapeutics is also developing bispecific antibodies that engage the innate immune system, but these have not yet reached the clinic.

        Our commercial opportunity could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products that are safer, more effective, have fewer or less severe effects, are more convenient, have a broader label, are marketed more effectively, are reimbursed or are less expensive than any products that we may develop. Our competitors also may obtain FDA, European Commission or other regulatory approval for their products more rapidly than we may obtain approval for ours, which could result in our competitors establishing a strong market position before we are able to enter the market. Even if our product candidates achieve marketing approval, they may be priced at a significant premium over competitive products if any have been approved by then, resulting in reduced competitiveness.

        In addition, our ability to compete in the future may be affected in many cases by insurers or other third-party payors seeking to encourage the use of biosimilar products. In March 2010, former President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act, or collectively, the Health Care Reform Law, a sweeping law intended to broaden access to health insurance, reduce or constrain the growth of healthcare spending, enhance remedies against fraud and abuse, add new transparency requirements for health care and health insurance industries, impose new taxes and fees on the health industry and impose additional health policy reforms. The Health Care Reform Law also created a new regulatory scheme authorizing the FDA to approve biosimilars. Under the Health Care Reform Law, a manufacturer may submit an application for licensure of a biologic product that is "biosimilar to" or "interchangeable with" a previously approved biological product or "reference product," without the need to submit a full package of preclinical and clinical data. Under this new statutory scheme, an application for a biosimilar product may not be submitted to the FDA until four years following approval of the reference product. The FDA may not approve a biosimilar product until 12 years from the date on which the reference product was approved. Even if a product is considered to be a reference product eligible for exclusivity, another company could market a competing version of that product if the FDA approves a full BLA for such product containing the sponsor's own preclinical data and data from adequate and well-controlled clinical studies to demonstrate the safety, purity and potency of their product. Furthermore, recent legislation has proposed that the 12-year exclusivity period for each reference product may be reduced to seven years.

        Smaller and other early-stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. These third parties compete with us in recruiting and retaining qualified scientific and management personnel, establishing clinical study sites and patient registration for clinical studies, as well as in acquiring technologies complementary to, or necessary for, our programs. In addition, the biopharmaceutical industry is characterized by rapid technological change. If we fail to stay at the forefront of technological change, we may be unable to compete effectively. Technological advances or products developed by our competitors may render our technologies or product candidates obsolete, less competitive or not economical.

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Enacted and future legislation may increase the difficulty and cost for us to obtain marketing approval of and commercialize our product candidates and may affect the prices we may set. The successful commercialization of our product candidates will depend in part on the extent to which governmental authorities and health insurers establish adequate coverage and reimbursement levels and pricing policies.

        In the United States, the European Union, and its respective member states and other foreign jurisdictions , there have been a number of legislative and regulatory changes and proposed changes regarding the healthcare system. These changes could prevent or delay marketing approval of our product candidates, restrict or regulate post-approval activities and affect our ability to sell profitably any products for which we obtain marketing approval. Among policy makers and payors in the United States and elsewhere, there is significant interest in promoting changes in healthcare systems with the stated goals of containing healthcare costs, improving quality and/or expanding access to healthcare.

        In the United States, the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, or the Medicare Modernization Act, changed the way Medicare covers and pays for pharmaceutical products. The legislation expanded Medicare coverage for drug purchases by the elderly and introduced a new reimbursement methodology based on average sale prices for physician-administered drugs. In addition, this legislation provided authority for limiting the number of drugs that will be covered in any therapeutic class. Cost-reduction initiatives and other provisions of this legislation could decrease the coverage and price that we receive for any approved products. If we successfully develop combinations of our product candidates with other potentially expensive agents, we may not achieve premium pricing for our products, which may impair our ability to achieve profitability. While the Medicare Modernization Act applies only to drug benefits for Medicare beneficiaries, private payors often follow Medicare coverage policy and payment limitations in setting their own reimbursement rates. Therefore, any reduction in reimbursement that results from the Medicare Modernization Act may result in a similar reduction in payments from private payors.

        In addition, the Health Care Reform Law, among other things, increased rebates a manufacturer must pay to the Medicaid program, addressed a new methodology by which rebates owed by manufacturers under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program are calculated for drugs that are inhaled, infused, instilled, implanted or injected, established a new Medicare Part D coverage gap discount program, in which manufacturers must provide 50% point-of-sale discounts on products covered under Part D and implemented payment system reforms including a national pilot program on payment bundling to encourage hospitals, physicians and other providers to improve the coordination, quality and efficiency of certain healthcare services through bundled payment models. Further, the new law imposed a significant annual fee on companies that manufacture or import branded prescription drug products. Substantial new provisions affecting compliance were enacted, which may affect our business practices with health care practitioners. The goal of the Health Care Reform Law is to reduce the cost of health care and substantially change the way health care is financed by both governmental and private insurers. While we cannot predict what impact on federal reimbursement policies this legislation will have in general or on our business specifically, the Health Care Reform Law may result in downward pressure on pharmaceutical reimbursement, which could negatively affect market acceptance of, and the price we may charge for, any products we develop that receive regulatory approval.

        Additionally, in March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care Education Reconciliation Act, or collectively the Affordable Care Act, was enacted to broaden access to health insurance, reduce or constrain the growth of healthcare spending, enhance remedies against fraud and abuse, add new transparency requirements for health care and health insurance industries, impose new taxes and fees on the health industry and impose additional health

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policy reforms. Furthermore, the Drug Supply Chain Security Act, enacted in 2013, imposed new obligations on manufacturers of pharmaceutical products related to product tracking and tracing.

        In recent years, members of Congress and the former Trump Administration considered legislation to fundamentally change or repeal the Affordable Care Act. While Congress has not passed repeal legislation to date, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ("TCJA") includes a provision repealing the individual insurance coverage mandate included in the Affordable Care Act, effective January 1, 2019. Congress may consider other legislation to replace elements of the Affordable Care Act. The implications of the Affordable Care Act, its possible repeal, any legislation that may be proposed to replace the Affordable Care Act, or the political uncertainty surrounding any repeal or replacement legislation for our business and financial condition, if any, are not yet clear.

        We anticipate that Congress, state legislatures, and third-party payors may continue to review and assess alternative healthcare delivery and payment systems and may in the future propose and adopt legislation or policy changes or implementations effecting additional fundamental changes in the healthcare delivery system. Additionally, any new laws may result in additional reductions in Medicare and other health care funding, which could have a material adverse effect on our customers and accordingly, our financial operations. We cannot assure you as to the ultimate content, timing, or effect of changes, nor is it possible at this time to estimate the impact of any such potential legislation.

        The delivery of healthcare in the European Union, including the establishment and operation of health services and the pricing and reimbursement of medicines, is almost exclusively a matter for national, rather than EU, law and policy. National governments and health service providers have different priorities and approaches to the delivery of health care and the pricing and reimbursement of products in that context. In general, however, the healthcare budgetary constraints in most EU member states have resulted in restrictions on the pricing and reimbursement of medicines by relevant health service providers. Coupled with ever-increasing EU and national regulatory burdens on those wishing to develop and market products, this could prevent or delay marketing approval of our product candidates, restrict or regulate post-approval activities and affect our ability to commercialize any products for which we obtain marketing approval.

Our business may become subject to economic, political, regulatory and other risks associated with international operations.

        Our business is subject to risks associated with conducting business internationally. A number of our suppliers and collaborative and clinical study relationships are located outside the United States. Accordingly, our future results could be harmed by a variety of factors, including:

    economic weakness, including inflation, or political instability in particular non-U.S. economies and markets;

    differing regulatory requirements for drug approvals in non-U.S. countries;

    potentially reduced protection for intellectual property rights;

    difficulties in compliance with non-U.S. laws and regulations;

    changes in non-U.S. regulations and customs, tariffs and trade barriers;

    changes in non-U.S. currency exchange rates and currency controls;

    changes in a specific country's or region's political or economic environment;

    trade protection measures, import or export licensing requirements or other restrictive actions by U.S. or non-U.S. governments;

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    negative consequences from changes in tax laws;

    compliance with tax, employment, immigration and labor laws for employees living or traveling abroad;

    workforce uncertainty in countries where labor unrest is more common than in the United States;

    difficulties associated with staffing and managing international operations, including differing labor relations;

    production shortages resulting from any events affecting raw material supply or manufacturing capabilities abroad; and

    business interruptions resulting from geo-political actions, including war and terrorism, health epidemics (See "—COVID-19 could adversely impact our business, including our supply chain, clinical trials and operations.") or natural disasters including earthquakes, typhoons, floods and fires.

        The Company's sole tax residency in Germany for purposes of the convention between Germany and the Netherlands for the avoidance of double taxation and the prevention of fiscal evasion with respect to taxes on income (the "German-Dutch tax treaty") is subject to the application of the provisions on tax residency as stipulated in the German -Dutch tax treaty as effective as of the date of this annual report. However, among others, Germany and the Netherlands entered into a Multilateral Convention to Implement Tax Treaty Related Measures to Prevent Base Erosion and Profit Shifting ("MLI"). The MLI operates to amend bilateral tax treaties between participating states, provided there is a match between certain options made by the relevant states.

        The MLI provides, amongst others, for an amendment of relevant rules regarding tax residency. According to provisional elections, the Netherlands applies such deviating rules on tax residency, i.e., did not opt out. With regard to Germany, provisional statements made at the time of signing the MLI indicate that it is intended to opt-out of the application of such provisions. However, given that the MLI has to date not been ratified in Germany and the options provided for in the MLI remain subject to discussion, it cannot be ruled out that Germany ultimately opts to amend the current rules regarding tax residency in line with the option exercised by the Netherlands. If Germany changed its provisional view on the election, the MLI rules on tax residency would become applicable to the German-Dutch tax treaty. In this case, the competent authorities of the Netherlands and Germany shall endeavour to determine by mutual agreement the sole tax residency of the Company. During the period in which a mutual agreement between both states is absent, the Company may not be entitled to any relief or exemption from tax provided by the German—Dutch tax treaty. During such a period, there would be a risk that both Germany and the Netherlands would levy dividend withholding tax, in addition to the risk of double taxation on the profits of the Company itself. If the sole tax residency is found to be in the Netherlands based on the mutual agreement, Dutch dividend withholding tax would apply exclusively.

Dividends distributed by the Company on our common shares to certain related parties in low-taxed jurisdictions might in the future become subject to an additional Dutch withholding tax on dividends.

        Under current Dutch tax law, dividends paid on our common shares may be subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax at a rate of 15% under the Dutch Dividend Withholding Tax Act 1965 (Wet op de dividendbelasting 1965; "Regular dividend withholding tax"), unless a domestic or treaty exemption or reduction applies, see "Dutch Tax Considerations—Withholding tax". On 25 March 2021, the Dutch State Secretary for Finance submitted a proposal of law to the Dutch parliament pursuant to which an additional withholding tax ("Additional withholding tax") will be imposed on

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dividends paid to related entities in low-taxed jurisdictions, effective January 1, 2024. An entity is related if (i) it holds, directly or indirectly a qualifying interest in the Company, (ii) the Company directly or indirectly holds a qualifying interest in the entity or (iii) an entity in which a third party holds a direct or indirect qualifying interest that also holds a qualifying interest in the Company. An entity is also considered related to the Company if the entity is part of a collaborating group (samenwerkende groep) of entities that jointly directly or indirectly holds a qualifying interest in the Company. The term qualifying interest means a direct or indirectly held interest—either by an entity individually or jointly if an entity is part of a collaborating group (samenwerkende groep)—that enables such entity or such collaborating group to exercise a definite influence over another entities' decisions, such as the Company, and allows it to determine the other entities' activities. The Additional withholding tax will be imposed at the highest corporate income tax rate in effect at the time of the distribution (currently 25%). The Additional withholding tax will be reduced with any Regular dividend withholding tax imposed on distributions so that the overall effective rate of withholding of Regular dividend withholding tax and Additional withholding tax will not exceed the highest corporate income tax rate in effect at the time of the distribution (currently 25%). The proposal of law is subject to amendment during the course of the legislative process and it needs to be approved by both chambers of the Dutch parliament before it can enter into force.

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Need for Additional Capital

We have incurred significant losses since inception and anticipate that we will continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future. We have no products approved for commercial sale, and to date we have not generated any revenue or profit from product sales. We may never achieve or sustain profitability.

        We are a clinical-stage immuno-oncology company. We have incurred significant losses since our inception. As of December 31, 2020, our accumulated deficit was € 275.9 million. Our losses have resulted principally from expenses incurred in research and development of our product candidates and from general and administrative expenses that we have incurred while building our business infrastructure. We expect to continue to incur losses for the foreseeable future, and we expect these losses to increase as we continue our research and development of, and seek regulatory approvals for, our product candidates, prepare for and begin to commercialize any approved products, and add infrastructure and personnel to support our product development efforts and operations as a public company. The net losses and negative cash flows incurred to date, together with expected future losses, have had, and likely will continue to have, an adverse effect on our shareholders' equity and working capital. The amount of future net losses will depend, in part, on the rate of future growth of our expenses and our ability to generate revenue.

        Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with pharmaceutical product development, we are unable to accurately predict the timing or amount of increased expenses or when, or if, we will be able to achieve profitability. For example, our expenses could increase if we are required by the FDA or the EMA to perform trials in addition to those that we currently expect to perform, or if there are any delays in completing our currently planned clinical studies or in the development of any of our product candidates.

        To become and remain profitable, we must succeed in developing and commercializing products with significant market potential. This will require us to be successful in a range of challenging activities for which we are only in the preliminary stages, including developing product candidates, obtaining regulatory approval for them, and manufacturing, marketing and selling those products for which we may obtain regulatory approval. We may never succeed in these activities and may never generate revenue from product sales that is significant enough to achieve profitability. Our ability to

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generate future revenue from product sales depends heavily on our success in many areas, including but not limited to:

    completing research and clinical development of our product candidates, including successfully completing registration clinical studies of AFM13 or certain of our other product candidates;

    obtaining marketing approvals for our product candidates, including AFM13 or AFM24, for which we complete clinical studies;

    developing a sustainable and scalable manufacturing process for any approved product candidates and maintaining supply and manufacturing relationships with third parties that can conduct the process and provide adequate (in amount and quality) products to support clinical development and the market demand for our product candidates, if approved;

    launching and commercializing product candidates for which we obtain marketing approval, either directly or with a collaborator or distributor;

    establishing sales, marketing, and distribution capabilities in the United States, and potentially other major markets;

    obtaining market acceptance of our product candidates as viable treatment options;

    addressing any competing technological and market developments;

    identifying, assessing, acquiring and/or developing new product candidates;

    negotiating favorable terms in any collaboration, licensing, or other arrangements into which we may enter;

    maintaining, protecting, and expanding our portfolio of intellectual property rights, including patents, trade secrets, and know-how; and

    attracting, hiring and retaining qualified personnel.

        Even if one or more of the product candidates that we develop is approved for commercial sale, we anticipate incurring significant costs associated with commercializing any approved product candidate. Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties of pharmaceutical product development, we are unable to accurately predict the timing or amount of increased expenses or when, or if, we will be able to achieve profitability. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not be able to sustain profitability in subsequent periods. Our failure to become or remain profitable would depress our market value and could impair our ability to raise capital, expand our business, develop other product candidates, or continue our operations. A decline in the value of our company could also cause you to lose all or part of your investment.

We will require substantial additional funding, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all, and, if not available, may require us to delay, scale back, or cease our product development programs or operations.

        We are advancing our product candidates through clinical development. Developing pharmaceutical products, including conducting preclinical studies and clinical studies, is expensive. In order to obtain such regulatory approval, we will be required to conduct clinical studies for each indication for each of our product candidates. We will require additional funding to complete the development and commercialization of our product candidates and to continue to advance the development of our other product candidates, and such funding may not be available on acceptable terms or at all. Although it is difficult to predict our liquidity requirements, based upon our current operating plan, assuming all of our programs advance as currently contemplated, we anticipate that

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our existing liquidity will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements at least into the second half of 2023. Because successful development of our product candidates is uncertain, we are unable to estimate the actual funds we will require to complete research and development and to commercialize our product candidates.

        Our future funding requirements will depend on many factors, including but not limited to:

    the number and characteristics of other product candidates that we pursue;

    the scope, progress, timing, cost and results of research, preclinical development, and clinical studies;

    the costs, timing and outcome of seeking and obtaining FDA and non-U.S. regulatory approvals;

    the costs associated with manufacturing our product candidates and establishing sales, marketing, and distribution capabilities;

    our ability to maintain, expand, and defend the scope of our intellectual property portfolio, including the amount and timing of any payments we may be required to make in connection with the licensing, filing, defense and enforcement of any patents or other intellectual property rights;

    the extent to which we acquire or in-license other products or technologies;

    our need and ability to hire additional management, scientific, and medical personnel;

    the effect of competing products that may limit market penetration of our product candidates;

    the amount and timing of revenues, if any, we receive from commercial sales of any product candidates for which we receive marketing approval in the future;

    our need to implement additional internal systems and infrastructure, including financial and reporting systems; and

    the economic and other terms, timing of and success of our existing collaborations, and any collaboration, licensing, or other arrangements into which we may enter in the future, including the timing of achievement of milestones and receipt of any milestone or royalty payments under these agreements.

        Until we can generate a sufficient amount of product revenue to finance our cash requirements, which we may never do, we expect to finance future cash needs primarily through a combination of public or private equity offerings, debt financings, strategic collaborations, and grant funding. If sufficient funds on acceptable terms are not available when needed, or at all, we could be forced to significantly reduce operating expenses and delay, scale back or eliminate one or more of our development programs or our business operations or even go bankrupt.

Raising additional capital may dilute our shareholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish rights to our intellectual property or future revenue streams.

        Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial product revenue, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, grants and licenses and development agreements in connection with any collaborations. We do not have any committed external source of funds. In the event we need to seek additional funds, we may raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities. In such an event, our shareholders' ownership interests will be diluted, and the terms of these new securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect our shareholders' rights as holders of our common shares. Debt financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our

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ability to take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making capital expenditures or declaring dividends.

        On January 8, 2021, we entered into a term loan agreement with Silicon Valley Bank German Branch, as lender. The loan agreement provides us with loans of up to €25.0 million available in three tranches: €10 million available at closing, an additional €7.5 million upon the achievement of certain conditions, including milestones related to our pipeline and market capitalization, and a third tranche of €7.5 million upon the achievement of certain additional conditions related to our pipeline and liquidity. The loans will mature at the end of November 2025 and proceeds will be used to fund research and development expenses for our expanding pipeline and for working capital purposes.

        If we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances or marketing, distribution or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, product candidates, intellectual property or future revenue streams. If we are unable to raise additional funds when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market product candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

We have broad discretion in the use of our cash on hand and may not use it effectively.

        As of December 31, 2020, we had €146.9 million in cash and cash equivalents. Our management will have broad discretion in the use of such funds and could spend them in ways that do not improve our results of operations or enhance the value of our common shares. The failure by our management to apply these funds effectively could result in financial losses that could have a material adverse effect on our business, cause the price of our common shares to decline and delay the development of our product candidates. Pending their use, we may invest our cash and cash equivalents in a manner that does not produce income or that loses value.

Our ability to use our net operating loss carry forwards and other tax attributes may be limited.

        Our ability to utilize our net operating losses, or NOLs, is currently limited, and may be limited further, under Section 8c of the Körperschaftsteuergesetz (the German Corporation Income Tax Act) and Section 10a of the Gewerbesteuergesetz (the German Trade Tax Act). These limitations apply if a qualified ownership change, as defined by Section 8c of the Körperschaftsteuergesetz, occurs and no exemption is applicable. Generally, a qualified ownership change occurs if more than 50% of the share capital or the voting rights are directly or indirectly transferred to a shareholder or a group of shareholders within a period of five years. A qualified ownership change may also occur in case of an increase in capital leading to a respective change in the shareholding. In the case of such qualified ownership change all tax losses and tax loss carry forwards available as of the time of the ownership change, cannot be utilized in the future. However, to the extent that the tax losses and tax loss carry forwards do not exceed hidden reserves taxable in Germany or the qualified ownership change is made for purposes of the Company's restructuring (zum Zwecke der Sanierung), they may be further utilized despite a qualified ownership change. Furthermore, Section 8c of the Körperschaftsteuergesetz is—under strict requirements—not applicable to a company provided that such company continues only those operations which are causing the loss (Section 8d Körperschaftsteuergesetz). In addition, the question whether the aforementioned described provisions of Section 8c of the Körperschaftsteuergesetz do comply with the German constitution is currently pending with the Bundesverfassungsgericht (German Supreme Court). On March 29, 2017, the German Supreme Court ruled that Section 8c of the Körperschaftsteuergesetz has not complied with the German constitution to the extent it formerly stated that a harmful ownership change should occur partially if more than 25% but less than 50% of the share capital or the voting rights are directly or indirectly transferred to a shareholder or a group of shareholders

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within a period of five years. As a consequence of this decision, the German legislator abolished that part of the provision.

        As of December 31, 2020, we had estimated NOL carry forwards for German tax purposes of approximately €234 million. Future changes in share ownership may also trigger an ownership change and, consequently, a Section 8c Körperschaftsteuergesetz or a Section 10a Gewerbesteuergesetz limitation. Any limitation may result in the expiration of a portion or the complete tax loss carry forwards before they can be utilized. As a result, if we earn net taxable income, our ability to use our pre-change NOL carry forwards to reduce German income tax may be subject to limitations, which could potentially result in increased future cash tax liability to us.

Our business and operations would suffer in the event of a security breach, system failure, invasion, corruption, destruction or interruption of our or our business partners' critical information technology systems or infrastructure.

        In the ordinary course of business, we and our business partners store sensitive data, including intellectual property and proprietary information related to our business and our business partners, on our information technology systems. Despite the implementation of security measures, these systems are vulnerable to damage from computer viruses, unauthorized access, cyber-attacks, natural disasters, terrorism, war and telecommunication, electrical and other system failures due to employee error, malfeasance or other disruptions. We could experience a business interruption, intentional theft of confidential information or reputational damage, including damage to key customer and partner relationships, from system failures, espionage attacks, malware, ransomware or other cyber-attacks. Such cyber-security breaches may compromise our system infrastructure or lead to data leakage, either internally or at our contractors or consultants. In particular, system failures or cyber-security breaches could result in the loss of nonclinical or clinical trial data from completed, ongoing or planned trials, which could cause delays in our regulatory approval efforts and significantly increase our costs to recover or reproduce the data. The risk of a security breach or disruption, particularly through cyber-attacks, has generally increased as the number, intensity and sophistication of attempted attacks and intrusions from around the world have increased.

        To the extent that any disruption or security breach were to result in a loss of, or damage to, our data or applications, or inappropriate disclosure of confidential or proprietary information, including protected health information or personal data of employees or former employees, we could be subject to legal claims or proceedings, liability under laws and regulations governing the protection of health and other personally identifiable information and related regulatory penalties. In any such event, our business, results of operations, financial position and cash flows could be materially adversely affected.

Risks Related to Our Dependence on Third Parties

Our existing collaborations on research and development candidates are important to our business, and future collaborations may also be important to us. If we are unable to maintain any of these collaborations, if these collaborations are not successful or if we fail to enter into new strategic relationships, our business could be adversely affected.

        We have entered into collaborations with other companies that we believe have provided us with valuable funding or other resources such as access to technologies, including our collaborations with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Genentech, The MD Anderson Cancer Center and Roivant Sciences,. In the future, we may enter into additional collaborations to leverage our technology platforms, fund our research and development programs or to gain access to sales, marketing or

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distribution capabilities. Our existing collaborations, and any future collaborations we enter into, may pose a number of risks, including the following:

    collaborators may have significant discretion in determining the efforts and resources that they will apply to these collaborations;

    collaborators may not perform their obligations as expected;

    collaborators may not pursue development and commercialization of any product candidates that achieve regulatory approval or may elect not to continue or renew development or commercialization programs based on clinical study results, changes in the collaborators' strategic focus or available funding, or external factors, such as an acquisition, that divert resources or create competing priorities;

    collaborators may delay clinical studies, provide insufficient funding for a clinical study program, stop a clinical study or abandon a product candidate, repeat or conduct new clinical studies or require a new formulation of a product candidate for clinical testing;

    collaborators could independently develop, or develop with third parties, products that compete directly or indirectly with our products or product candidates if the collaborators believe that competitive products are more likely to be successfully developed or can be commercialized under terms that are more economically attractive than ours;

    product candidates discovered in collaboration with us may be viewed by our collaborators as competitive with their own product candidates or products, which may cause collaborators to cease to devote resources to the commercialization of our product candidates;

    a collaborator with marketing and distribution rights to one or more of our product candidates that achieve regulatory approval may not commit sufficient resources to the marketing and distribution of such product or products;

    disagreements with collaborators, including disagreements over proprietary rights, contract interpretation or the preferred course of development, might cause delays or termination of the research, development or commercialization of product candidates, might lead to additional responsibilities for us with respect to product candidates, or might result in litigation or arbitration, any of which would be time-consuming and expensive;

    collaborators may not properly maintain or defend our intellectual property rights or may use our proprietary information in such a way as to invite litigation that could jeopardize or invalidate our intellectual property or proprietary information or expose us to potential litigation;

    collaborators may infringe the intellectual property rights of third parties, which may expose us to litigation and potential liability; and

    collaborations may be terminated for the convenience of the collaborator and, if terminated, we could be required to raise additional capital to pursue further development or commercialization of the applicable product candidates.

        If our collaborations on research and development candidates do not result in the successful development and commercialization of products or if one of our collaborators terminates its agreement with us, we may not receive any future research funding or milestone or royalty payments under the collaboration. If we do not receive the funding we expect under these agreements, our development of our technology platforms and product candidates could be delayed and we may need additional resources to develop product candidates and our technology platforms.

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        All of the risks relating to product development, regulatory approval and commercialization described in this Annual Report also apply to the activities of our program collaborators. Additionally, subject to its contractual obligations to us, if one of our collaborators is involved in a business combination, the collaborator might deemphasize or terminate the development or commercialization of any product candidate licensed to it by us. If one of our collaborators terminates its agreement with us, we may find it more difficult to attract new collaborators.

        For some of our product candidates, we may in the future determine to collaborate with additional pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for development and potential commercialization of therapeutic products. We face significant competition in seeking appropriate collaborators. Our ability to reach a definitive agreement for a collaboration will depend, among other things, upon our assessment of the collaborator's resources and expertise, the terms and conditions of the proposed collaboration and the proposed collaborator's evaluation of a number of factors. These factors may include the design or results of clinical studies, the likelihood of approval by the FDA, the EMA or similar regulatory authorities outside the United States, the potential market for the subject product candidate, the costs and complexities of manufacturing and delivering such product candidate to patients, the potential of competing products, the existence of uncertainty with respect to our ownership of technology, which can exist if there is a challenge to such ownership without regard to the merits of the challenge and industry and market conditions generally. The collaborator may also consider alternative product candidates or technologies for similar indications that may be available to collaborate on and whether such a collaboration could be more attractive than the one with us for our product candidate.

        Collaborations are complex and time-consuming to negotiate and document. Negotiation and diligence of potential partnerships, collaborations and alliances could require diversion of significant business resources, which could adversely impact our business operations. Furthermore, these negotiations and diligences may not eventually result in a signed agreement.

        In addition, there have been a significant number of recent business combinations among large pharmaceutical companies that have resulted in a reduced number of potential future collaborators. If we are unable to reach agreements with suitable collaborators on a timely basis, on acceptable terms, or at all, we may have to curtail the development of a product candidate, reduce or delay one or more of our other development programs, delay its potential commercialization or reduce the scope of any sales or marketing activities, or increase our expenditures and undertake development or commercialization activities at our own expense. If we elect to fund and undertake development or commercialization activities on our own, we may need to obtain additional expertise and additional capital, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all. If we fail to enter into collaborations and do not have sufficient funds or expertise to undertake the necessary development and commercialization activities, we may not be able to further develop our product candidates or bring them to market or continue to develop our technology platforms and our business may be materially and adversely affected.

        We may also be restricted under existing collaboration agreements from entering into future agreements on certain terms with potential collaborators. Subject to certain specified exceptions, our former collaboration with Amphivena contains restrictions on our engaging in activities that were the subject of the collaboration with third parties for specified periods of time. These restrictions survived the expiration of the agreement in July 2016.

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CROs and independent clinical investigators that we engage to conduct our clinical studies may not devote sufficient time or attention to our clinical studies or be able to repeat their past success.

        We expect to continue to depend on independent clinical investigators and CROs to conduct our clinical studies. CROs may also assist us in the collection and analysis of data. There is a limited number of third-party service providers that specialize or have the expertise required to achieve our business objectives. Identifying, qualifying and managing performance of third-party service providers can be difficult, time consuming and cause delays in our development programs. These investigators and CROs will not be our employees and we will not be able to control, other than by contract, the amount of resources, including time, which they devote to our product candidates and clinical studies. In addition, certain clinical studies in which we are involved and which are testing our product candidates are sponsored by academic sites, known as investigator-sponsored study, or ISTs. By definition, the financing, design, and conduct of the clinical study are under the sole responsibility of the respective sponsor. Therefore, we have limited control over these clinical studies and we do not have control over the timing and reporting of the data from these trials. In addition, we may have limited information about ISTs while they are being conducted, including the status of trial initiation and patient recruitment, changes to trial design and clinical study results. The AFM13 phase 2a study in HL and the phase 1b/2a study in CD30+ lymphoma with cutaneous manifestations were ISTs. An additional AFM13 phase 1 IST was recently initiated by The MD Anderson Cancer Center with CD30+ lymphoma patients. If independent investigators or CROs fail to devote sufficient resources to the development of our product candidates, or if their performance is substandard, it may delay or compromise the completion of trials of our product candidates as well as the prospects for approval and commercialization of any product candidates that we develop. In addition, the use of third-party service providers requires us to disclose our proprietary information to these parties, which could increase the risk that this information will be misappropriated. Further, the FDA and other regulatory authorities require that we comply with standards, commonly referred to as current Good Clinical Practice, or cGCP, and other local legal requirements, e.g., data privacy, for conducting, recording and reporting clinical studies to assure that data and reported results are credible and accurate and that the rights, integrity and confidentiality of trial subjects are protected. Failure of clinical investigators or CROs to meet their obligations to us or comply with cGCP procedures or other applicable legal requirements could adversely affect the clinical development of our product candidates and harm our business.

We contract with third parties for the manufacture of our product candidates for clinical testing in mono- and combination therapy settings and expect to continue to do so for commercialization. This reliance on third parties increases the risk that we will not have sufficient quantities of our product candidates or products, or compounds of such third parties, or such quantities at an acceptable cost, which could delay, prevent or impair our development or commercialization efforts.

        We anticipate continuing our engagement of contract manufacturing organizations to provide our clinical supply and internal capacity as we advance our product candidates into and through clinical development. We expect to use third parties for the manufacture of our product candidates for clinical testing, as well as for commercial manufacture. We plan to eventually enter into long-term supply agreements with several manufacturers for commercial supplies. We may be unable to reach agreement on satisfactory terms with contract manufacturers to manufacture our product candidates.

        Additionally, the facilities to manufacture our product candidates must be the subject of a satisfactory inspection before the FDA, the EMA or other regulatory authorities approve a BLA or grant a marketing authorization for the product candidate manufactured at that facility. We will depend on these third-party manufacturing partners for compliance with the FDA's and the EMA's

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requirements for the manufacture of our finished products. If our manufacturers cannot successfully manufacture material that conforms to our specifications and the FDA, European Commission and other regulatory authorities' cGMP requirements, our product candidates will not be approved or, if already approved, may be subject to recalls.

        Reliance on third-party manufacturers entails risks to which we would not be subject if we manufactured the product candidates ourselves, including:

    the possibility of a breach of the manufacturing agreements by the third parties because of factors beyond our control;

    the possibility of termination or nonrenewal of agreements by the third parties before we are able to arrange for a qualified replacement third-party manufacturer; and

    the possibility that we may not be able to secure a manufacturer or manufacturing capacity in a timely manner and on satisfactory terms in order to meet our manufacturing needs.

        Any of these factors could cause the delay of approval or commercialization of our product candidates, cause us to incur higher costs or prevent us from commercializing our product candidates successfully. Furthermore, if any of our product candidates are approved and contract manufacturers fail to deliver the required commercial quantities of finished product on a timely basis and at commercially reasonable prices, and we are unable to find one or more replacement manufacturers capable of production at a substantially equivalent cost, in substantially equivalent volumes and quality and on a timely basis, we would likely be unable to meet demand for our products and could lose potential revenue. It may take several years to establish an alternative source of supply for our product candidates and to have any such new source approved by the FDA, the EMA or any other relevant regulatory authorities.

        For our clinical development of AFM13 in combination with the anti-PD-1 Keytruda® (pembrolizumab), we entered into an agreement with Merck pursuant to which Merck provided us with pembrolizumab to conduct a phase 1b clinical combination trial in relapsed/refractory HL. We were dependent on Merck for this supply of pembrolizumab. Further, we recently entered into a collaboration with Roche for the clinical development of AFM24 in combination with the anti-PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor atezolizumab (Tecentriq®). In addition, if we wish to pursue further development of AFM13, AFM24 or any of our other ICE® molecules in combination with pembrolizumab, atezolizumab or any other CPI, we will need to reach an agreement with Merck, Roche or another partner for such supply of pembrolizumab, atezolizumab or another CPI, respectively. In addition, we are currently dependent on collaborators, such as MD Anderson, NKGen Biotech (formerly known as NKMax America) and Artiva, for the supply of NK cells for clinical and preclinical studies that evaluate our ICE® molecules in combination with NK cells. If we do not have an adequate supply and/or cannot reach an agreement with the applicable partner, we may not be able to develop AFM13, AFM24, AFM28 or any of our other ICE® molecules in any such a combinations. Any future supply agreement with a partner for combination trials with our ICE® molecules could influence our clinical development strategy or our intellectual property or our economic rights, and therefore might impact the content we can derive from such clinical development.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

If we are unable to obtain and enforce patent protection for our product candidates and related technology, our business could be materially harmed.

        Issued patents may be challenged, narrowed, invalidated or circumvented. In addition, court decisions may introduce uncertainty in the enforceability or scope of patents owned by biotechnology companies. The legal systems of certain countries do not favor the aggressive enforcement of patents, and the laws of non-U.S. countries may not allow us to protect our inventions with patents

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to the same extent as the laws of the United States and Europe. Because patent applications in the United States, Europe and many other non-U.S. jurisdictions are typically not published until 18 months after filing, or in some cases not at all, and because publications of discoveries in scientific literature lag behind actual discoveries, we cannot be certain that we were the first to make the inventions claimed in our issued patents or pending patent applications, or that we were the first to file for protection of the inventions set forth in our patents or patent applications. As a result, we may not be able to obtain or maintain protection for certain inventions. Therefore, the enforceability and scope of our patents in the United States, Europe and in other non-U.S. countries cannot be predicted with certainty; as a result, any patents that we own or license may not provide sufficient protection against competitors. We may not be able to obtain or maintain patent protection from our pending patent applications, from those we may file in the future, or from those we may license from third parties. Moreover, even if we are able to obtain patent protection, such patent protection may be of insufficient scope to achieve our business objectives.

        We own and/or control our AFM13 patent portfolio, which includes three patent families. The first patent family relates to the mode of action of AFM13, the recruitment of immune effector cells via a specific receptor, i.e., an antibody or antigen-binding fragment thereof having the CDRs of AFM13. These patents will expire in 2026 in Europe and in 2029 in the US. A second patent family on AFM13 claims the method for the production of AFM13 and the product produced by this method and has not yet been published and respective issued patents will expire in 2040. A further patent application on AFM13 relating to its combination with anti-PD1 antibodies was filed in 2016. The already granted European and Japan patent will expire in 2036 as all other patents issued on still pending applications in this family.

        Moreover, we own and/or control our AFM24 patent portfolio, which includes one patent family directed to the compound of AFM24. The non-provisional patent application was filed in 2019 and issued patents will not expire before 2039.

        Our strategy depends on our ability to identify and seek patent protection for our discoveries. This process is expensive and time consuming, and we may not be able to file and prosecute all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner or in all jurisdictions where protection may be commercially advantageous, or we may financially not be able to protect our proprietary rights at all. Despite our efforts to protect our proprietary rights, unauthorized parties may be able to obtain and use information that we regard as proprietary. The issuance of a patent does not ensure that it is valid or enforceable, so even if we obtain patents, they may not be valid or enforceable against third parties. In addition, the issuance of a patent does not give us the right to practice the patented invention. Third parties may have blocking patents that could prevent us from marketing our own patented product and practicing our own patented technology. Third parties may also seek to market biosimilar versions of any approved products. Alternatively, third parties may seek approval to market their own products similar to, or otherwise competitive with our products. In these circumstances, we may need to defend and/or assert our patents, including by filing lawsuits alleging patent infringement. In any of these types of proceedings, a court or agency with jurisdiction may find our patents invalid and/or unenforceable. Even if we have valid and enforceable patents, these patents still may not provide protection against competing products or processes sufficient to achieve our business objectives.

        The patent position of pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies, including ours, is generally uncertain and involves complex legal and factual considerations for which legal principles remain unsolved. The standards which the United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, and its non-U.S. counterparts use to grant patents are not always applied predictably or uniformly and can change. There is also no uniform, worldwide policy regarding the subject matter and scope of claims granted or allowable in pharmaceutical or biotechnology patents. The laws of some non-U.S. countries do not protect proprietary information to the same extent as the laws of the United States,

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and many companies have encountered significant problems and costs in protecting their proprietary information in these non-U.S. countries. Outside the United States, patent protection must be sought in individual jurisdictions, further adding to the cost and uncertainty of obtaining adequate patent protection outside of the United States. Accordingly, we cannot predict whether additional patents protecting our technology will issue in the United States or in non-U.S. jurisdictions, or whether any patents that do issue will have claims of adequate scope to provide competitive advantage. Moreover, we cannot predict whether third parties will be able to successfully obtain claims or the breadth of such claims. The allowance of broader claims may increase the incidence and cost of patent interference proceedings, opposition proceedings, and/or re-examination proceedings, the risk of infringement litigation, and the vulnerability of the claims to challenge. On the other hand, the allowance of narrower claims does not eliminate the potential for adversarial proceedings and may fail to provide a competitive advantage. Our issued patents may not contain claims sufficiently broad to protect us against third parties with similar technologies or products or provide us with any competitive advantage.

Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to operate without infringing the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties.

        Our success will depend in part on our ability to operate without infringing the proprietary rights of third parties. Other entities may have or obtain patents or proprietary rights that could limit our ability to make, use, sell, offer for sale or import our future approved products or impair our competitive position.

        Patents could be issued to third parties that we may ultimately be found to infringe. Third parties may have or obtain valid and enforceable patents or proprietary rights that could block us from developing product candidates using our technology. Our failure to obtain a license to any technology that we require may materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Moreover, our failure to maintain a license to any technology that we require may also materially harm our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Furthermore, we would be exposed to the threat of litigation.

        In the pharmaceutical industry, significant litigation and other proceedings regarding patents, patent applications, trademarks and other intellectual property rights have become commonplace. The types of situations in which we may become a party to such litigation or proceedings include:

    we or our collaborators may initiate litigation or other proceedings against third parties seeking to invalidate the patents held by those third parties or to obtain a judgment that our products or processes do not infringe those third parties' patents;

    if our competitors file patent applications that claim technology also claimed by us or our licensors, we or our licensors may be required to participate in interference or opposition proceedings to determine the priority of invention, which could jeopardize our patent rights and potentially provide a third party with a dominant patent position;

    if third parties initiate litigation claiming that our processes or products infringe their patent or other intellectual property rights, we and our collaborators will need to defend against such proceedings; and

    if a license to necessary technology is terminated, the licensor may initiate litigation claiming that our processes or products infringe or misappropriate their patent or other intellectual property rights and/or that we breached our obligations under the license agreement, and we and our collaborators would need to defend against such proceedings.

        These lawsuits would be costly and could affect our results of operations and divert the attention of our management and scientific personnel. There is a risk that a court would decide that we or our

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collaborators are infringing the third party's patents and would order us or our collaborators to stop the activities covered by the patents. In that event, we or our collaborators may not have a viable alternative to the technology protected by the patent and may need to halt work on the affected product candidate or cease commercialization of an approved product. In addition, there is a risk that a court will order us or our collaborators to pay the other party damages. An adverse outcome in any litigation or other proceedings could subject us to significant liabilities to third parties and require us to cease using the technology that is at issue or to license the technology from third parties. We may not be able to obtain any required licenses on commercially acceptable terms or at all. Any of these outcomes could have a material adverse effect on our business.

        The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries have produced a significant number of patents, and it may not always be clear to industry participants, including us, which patents cover various types of products or methods of use. The coverage of patents is subject to interpretation by the courts, and the interpretation is not always uniform or predictable. If we are sued for patent infringement, we would need to demonstrate that our products or methods either do not infringe the patent claims of the relevant patent or that the patent claims are invalid, and we may not be able to do this. Proving invalidity is difficult. For example, in the United States, proving invalidity requires showing clear and convincing evidence to overcome the presumption of validity enjoyed by issued patents. Even if we are successful in these proceedings, we may incur substantial costs and divert management time and attention in pursuing these proceedings, which could have a material adverse effect on us. If we are unable to avoid infringing the patent rights of others, we may be required to seek a license, defend an infringement action or challenge the validity of the patents in court. Patent litigation is costly and time consuming. We may not have sufficient resources to bring these actions to a successful conclusion. In addition, if we do not obtain a license, develop or obtain non-infringing technology, fail to defend an infringement action successfully or have infringed patents declared invalid, we may incur substantial monetary damages, encounter significant delays in bringing our product candidates to market and be precluded from manufacturing or selling our product candidates.

        The cost of any patent litigation or other proceeding, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial. Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the cost of such litigation and proceedings more effectively than we can because of their substantially greater resources. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of patent litigation or other proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete in the marketplace. Patent litigation and other proceedings may also absorb significant management time.

The patent protection and patent prosecution for some of our product candidates is dependent on third parties.

        While we normally seek to obtain the right to control prosecution, maintenance and enforcement of the patents relating to our product candidates, there may be times when the filing and prosecution activities for patents relating to our product candidates are controlled by our licensors. Although we monitor the ongoing prosecution and maintenance of the licensed patents, if any of our future licensing partners fail to prosecute, maintain and enforce such patents and patent applications in a manner consistent with the best interests of our business, including by payment of all applicable fees for patents covering AFM13, AFM24, or any of our product candidates, we could lose our rights to the intellectual property or our exclusivity with respect to those rights, our ability to develop and commercialize those product candidates may be adversely affected and we may not be able to prevent competitors from making, using, and selling competing products .

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Our business may be adversely affected if we are unable to gain access to relevant intellectual property rights of third parties, or if our licensing partners terminate our rights in certain technologies that are licensed or sublicensed to us.

        We currently rely, and may in the future rely, on certain intellectual property rights licensed from third parties in order to be able to use various proprietary technologies that are material to our business. For example, the immune cell engager technology was developed under certain patents licensed exclusively to us by the German Cancer Research Center (known as the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, or DKFZ, in German) under a 2001 license agreement, which was subsequently amended in 2006 and terminated in 2018 due to expiry of the last patent under this license agreement. Additionally, an antibody generated in the development of our immune cell engager candidates was developed using antibody phage display technologies licensed to us by Xoma Corporation. In March 2018, the last of the licensed Xoma patent rights expired. In each of these cases, the licensor retained their full ownership interest with respect to the licensed patent rights, and our rights to use the technologies associated with those patents and to employ the inventions claimed in the licensed patent rights were subject to the continuation of and our compliance with the terms of those licenses. In April 2021, we and Xoma agreed to terminate our license agreement in exchange for de minimis milestone payments upon marketing approval of certain of our product candidates currently in development and a 1% or less royalty on net sales of any such approved product candidates.

        In some cases, we do not control the prosecution, maintenance or filing of the patents to which we hold licenses, and the enforcement of our licensed patents or defense of any claims asserting the invalidity of these patents is subject to the control or cooperation of our licensors. We cannot be certain that our licensors will prosecute, maintain, enforce and defend the licensed patent rights in a manner consistent with the best interests of our business. We also cannot be certain that drafting or prosecution of the licensed patents by our licensors have been conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and will result in valid and enforceable patents and other intellectual property rights.

        We are a party to a number of agreements, including license agreements, through which we have gained rights to certain intellectual property that relate to our business and we expect to enter into additional such agreements in the future. We expect that future agreements will impose various diligence, commercialization, milestone payment, royalty, and other obligations on us. Certain of our licenses contain provisions that allow the licensor to terminate the license upon the occurrence of specific events or conditions. For example, our rights under each of the licenses described above are subject to our continued compliance with the terms of the licenses, certain diligence and development obligations, the payment of royalties, milestone payments and other fees, and certain disclosure and confidentiality obligations. If we are found to be in breach of any of our license agreements, in certain circumstances our licensors may take action against us, including by terminating the applicable license. Because of the complexity of our product candidates and the patents we have licensed, determining the scope of the licenses and related obligations may be difficult and could lead to disputes between us and the licensor. An unfavorable resolution of such a dispute could lead to an increase in the royalties payable pursuant to the license or a termination of the license. If any of our licensors were to terminate our license agreement with them, we may be prevented from the continued use of certain technologies, in clinical studies or, if our products are approved for marketing, from using such technologies in the manufacturing of products that could be sold commercially. This could delay or prevent us from offering our product candidates. We might not have the necessary rights or the financial resources to develop, manufacture or market our current or future product candidates without the rights granted under these licenses, and the loss of sales or potential sales in such product candidates could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

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        Under certain of our agreements, our licensors have the right to convert an exclusive license to a non-exclusive license upon the expiration of the initial exclusivity period or upon the occurrence of certain events. Such a conversion would potentially allow third parties to practice the technologies licensed under the agreement and could materially adversely affect the value of the product candidate we are developing under the agreement.

        In addition to the above risks, certain of our intellectual property rights are sublicenses under intellectual property owned by third parties. The actions of our licensors may therefore affect our rights to use our sublicensed intellectual property, even if we are in compliance with all of the obligations under our license agreements.

If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information, the value of our technology and products could be adversely affected.

        In addition to patent protection, we also rely on other proprietary rights, including protection of trade secrets, and other proprietary information. To maintain the confidentiality of trade secrets and proprietary information, we enter into confidentiality agreements with our employees, to the extent a confidentiality obligation is not covered by their employment agreements, consultants, collaborators and others upon the commencement of their relationships with us. These agreements require that all confidential information developed by the individual or made known to the individual by us during the course of the individual's relationship with us be kept confidential and not disclosed to third parties and the public domain, so that it cannot be used for patent protection anymore, either by local law or if not applicable pursuant to specific agreements with employees and our personnel policies it is intended that any inventions conceived by the individual in the course of rendering services to us shall be our exclusive property. However, we may not obtain these agreements in all circumstances, and individuals with whom we have these agreements or may not comply with their terms or with local law. Thus, despite such legal provisions or agreement, such inventions may become assigned to third parties. In the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of our trade secrets or proprietary information, these legal provisions or agreements, even if obtained, may not provide meaningful protection, particularly for our trade secrets or other confidential information. To the extent that our employees, consultants or contractors use technology or know-how owned by third parties in their work for us, disputes may arise between us and those third parties as to the rights in related inventions. To the extent that an individual who is not an Affimed employee and thus not obligated to assign rights in intellectual property to us and is rightfully an inventor of intellectual property, we may need to obtain an assignment or a license to that intellectual property from that individual, or a third party or from that individual's assignee. Such assignment or license may not be available on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

        Adequate remedies may not exist in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of our proprietary information. The disclosure of our trade secrets would impair our competitive position and may materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our competitive business position. In addition, others may independently discover or develop our trade secrets and proprietary information, and the existence of our own trade secrets affords no protection against such independent discovery.

        As is common in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, we employ individuals who were previously or concurrently employed at research institutions and/or other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our competitors or potential competitors. We may be subject to claims that these employees, or we, have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed trade secrets or other proprietary information of their former employers, or that patents and applications we have filed to protect inventions of these employees, even those related to one or more of our product

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candidates, are rightfully owned by their former or concurrent employer. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. Even if we are successful in our defense, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

Obtaining and maintaining our patent protection depends on compliance with various procedural, documentary, fee payment and other requirements imposed by governmental patent agencies, and our patent protection could be reduced or eliminated for non-compliance with these requirements.

        Periodic maintenance fees, renewal fees, annuity fees and various other governmental fees on patents and/or applications will be due to the USPTO and various non-U.S. patent offices at various points over the lifetime of our patents and/or applications. We have systems in place to remind us to pay these fees, and we rely on our outside counsel to pay these fees when due. Additionally, the USPTO and various non-U.S. patent offices require compliance with a number of procedural, documentary, fee payment and other similar provisions during the patent application process. We employ reputable law firms and other professionals to help us comply, and in many cases, an inadvertent lapse can be cured by payment of a late fee or by other means in accordance with rules applicable to the particular jurisdiction. However, there are situations in which noncompliance can result in abandonment or lapse of the patent or patent application, resulting in partial or complete loss of patent rights in the relevant jurisdiction. If such an event were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, we are responsible for the payment of patent fees for patent rights that we have licensed from other parties. If any licensor of these patents does not itself elect to make these payments, and we fail to do so, we may be liable to the licensor for any costs and consequences of any resulting loss of patent rights.

Certain of our employees and patents are subject to German law.

        Approximately 112 of our personnel, including certain of our managing directors and most of our employees working in research and development, work in Germany and are subject to German employment law. Ideas, developments, discoveries and inventions made by such employees are subject to the provisions of the German Act on Employees' Inventions (Arbeitnehmererfindungsgesetz), which regulates the ownership of, and compensation for, inventions made by employees. We face the risk that disputes may occur between us and our employees or ex-employees pertaining to the sufficiency of compensation paid by us, allocation of rights to inventions under this act or alleged non-adherence to the provisions of this act, any of which may be costly to resolve and take up our management's time and efforts whether we prevail or fail in such dispute.

If we do not obtain protection under the Hatch-Waxman Amendments and similar non-U.S. legislation for extending the term of patents covering each of our product candidates, our business may be materially harmed.

        Depending upon the timing, duration and conditions of FDA marketing approval of our product candidates, one or more of our U.S. patents may be eligible for limited patent term extension under the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984, referred to as the Hatch-Waxman Amendments and similar legislation in the EU. The Hatch-Waxman Amendments permit a patent term extension of up to five years for a patent covering an approved product as compensation for effective patent term lost during product development and the FDA regulatory review process. However, we may not receive an extension if we fail to apply within applicable deadlines, fail to apply prior to expiration of relevant patents or otherwise fail to satisfy applicable requirements. Moreover, the length of the extension could be less than we request. If we are unable to obtain patent term extension or the term of any such extension is less than we request, the period

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during which we can enforce our patent rights for that product will be shortened and our competitors may obtain approval to market competing products sooner. As a result, our revenue from applicable products could be reduced, possibly materially.

Our information technology systems could face serious disruptions that could adversely affect our business.

        Our information technology and other internal infrastructure systems, including corporate firewalls, servers, leased lines and connection to the Internet, face the risk of systemic failure that could disrupt our operations. A significant disruption in the availability of our information technology and other internal infrastructure systems could cause interruptions in our collaborations with our partners and delays in our research and development work.

Risks Related to Legal Compliance Matters

Because we and our suppliers are subject to environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, we may become exposed to liability and substantial expenses in connection with environmental compliance or remediation activities which may adversely affect our business and financial condition.

        Our operations, including our research, development, testing and manufacturing activities, are subject to numerous environmental, health and safety laws and regulations. These laws and regulations govern, among other things, the controlled use, handling, release and disposal of, and the maintenance of a registry for, hazardous materials and biological materials, such as chemical solvents, human cells, carcinogenic compounds, mutagenic compounds and compounds that have a toxic effect on reproduction, laboratory procedures and exposure to blood-borne pathogens. If we fail to comply with such laws and regulations, we could be subject to fines or other sanctions.

        As with other companies engaged in activities similar to ours, we face a risk of environmental liability inherent in our current and historical activities, including liability relating to releases of or exposure to hazardous or biological materials. Environmental, health and safety laws and regulations are becoming more stringent. We may be required to incur substantial expenses in connection with future environmental compliance or remediation activities, in which case, our production and development efforts may be interrupted or delayed and our financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

        The third parties with whom we contract to manufacture our product candidates are also subject to these and other environmental, health and safety laws and regulations. Liabilities they incur pursuant to these laws and regulations could result in significant costs or in certain circumstances, an interruption in operations, any of which could adversely impact our business and financial condition if we are unable to find an alternate supplier in a timely manner.

Our employees may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including noncompliance with regulatory standards and requirements and insider trading.

        We are exposed to the risk of employee fraud or other misconduct. Misconduct by employees could include intentional failures to comply with FDA or EMA regulations, to provide accurate information to the FDA or the EMA or intentional failures to report financial information or data accurately or to disclose unauthorized activities to us. Employee misconduct could also involve the improper use of information obtained in the course of clinical studies, which could result in regulatory sanctions and serious harm to our reputation. We have adopted a Compliance Management System (comprising the code of conduct and the compliance policy) which is based on three pillars: prevent, detect and respond to misconduct and an insider trading policy, each of which is communicated on a regular basis. However, it is not always possible to identify and deter employee misconduct, and the

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precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting us from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from a failure to comply with these laws or regulations. If any such actions are instituted against us, and we are not successful in defending ourselves or asserting our rights, those actions could have a significant impact on our business, including the imposition of significant fines or other sanctions.

We are subject to governmental regulation and other legal obligations in the EU and European Economic Area, or EEA, related to privacy, data protection and data security. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our business.

        We are subject to diverse laws and regulations relating to data privacy and security in the EU and eventually in the EEA, including Regulation 2016/679, known as the GDPR. The GDPR applies extraterritorially and implements stringent operational requirements for controllers and processors of personal data. New global privacy rules are being enacted and existing ones are being updated and strengthened. We are likely to be required to expend capital and other resources to ensure ongoing compliance with these laws and regulations.

        Complying with these numerous, complex and often changing regulations is expensive and difficult. Failure by us, any partners, our service providers, or our employees or contractors to comply with the GDPR could result in regulatory investigations, enforcement notices and/or fines of up to the greater of €20 million or 4% of our total worldwide annual revenue. In addition to the foregoing, a breach of privacy laws or data security laws, particularly those resulting in a significant security incident or breach involving the misappropriation, loss or other unauthorized use or disclosure of sensitive or confidential patient or consumer information, could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation and financial condition.

        As a data controller, we are accountable for any third-party service providers we engage to process personal data on our behalf, including our clinical research organizations, or CROs. We attempt to mitigate the associated risks by performing security assessments and due diligence of our vendors and requiring all such third-party providers with data access to sign agreements and obligating them to only process data according to our instructions and to take sufficient security measures to protect such data. There is no assurance that these contractual measures and our own privacy and security-related safeguards will protect us from the risks associated with the third-party processing, storage and transmission of such information. Any violation of data or security laws by our third-party processors could have a material adverse effect on our business and result in the fines and penalties outlined above.

        Where we transfer personal data out of the EU and EEA, we do so in compliance with the relevant data export requirements. Since the European Court of Justice declared the US Privacy Shield invalid in June 2020, there has been uncertainty about how to comply with data protection requirements when transferring personal data from the EU to the US.. Until a new legal framework and guidance from the responsible authorities is available, including updated model clauses from the European Commission, there will be continued uncertainty. Any changes will require us to find alternative bases for the compliant transfer of personal data outside the EEA and we continue to monitor developments in this area.

        We are also subject to evolving European privacy laws on cookies and on e-marketing. The EU is in the process of replacing the e-Privacy Directive (2002/58/EC) with a new set of rules taking the form of a regulation, which will be directly implemented in the laws of each European member state. The draft e-Privacy Regulation imposes strict opt-in marketing rules with limited exceptions for business-to-business communications, alters rules on third-party cookies, web beacons and similar technology and significantly increases fining powers to the greater of €20 million or 4% of total

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worldwide annual revenue. While the e-Privacy Regulation was originally intended to be adopted on May 25, 2018 (alongside the GDPR), it is still going through the European legislative process and is now expected to be adopted during 2021, following a transition period.

        We process personal data in relation to participants in our clinical trials in the EEA, including the health and medical information of these participants. The GDPR is directly applicable in each EU Member State, however, it provides that EU Member States may introduce further conditions, including limitations which could limit our ability to collect, use and share personal data (including health and medical information), or could cause our compliance costs to increase, ultimately having an adverse impact on our business. The GDPR imposes onerous accountability obligations requiring data controllers and processors to maintain a record of their data processing and implement policies as part of its mandated privacy governance framework. It also requires data controllers to be transparent and disclose upon request to data subjects (in a concise, intelligible and easily accessible form) how their personal information is to be used, imposes limitations on retention of personal data; defines for the first time pseudonymized (i.e., key-coded) data; introduces mandatory data breach notification requirements; and sets higher standards for data controllers to demonstrate that they have obtained valid consent for certain data processing activities. In addition to the foregoing, a breach of the GDPR could result in regulatory investigations, reputational damage, orders to cease/change our use of data, enforcement notices, as well potential civil claims including class action type litigation where individuals suffer harm.

Risks Relating to Employee Matters and Managing Growth

Our future success depends on our ability to retain key executives and to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel.

        We are highly dependent on the research and development, clinical and business development expertise of our managing directors and other key employees. We have entered into multi-year executive agreements with our managing directors. If any of our managing directors or other key employees becomes unavailable to perform services for us, we may not be able to find a qualified replacement in a timely fashion, which could impede the achievement of our research, development and commercialization objectives and seriously harm our ability to successfully implement our business strategy. We do not maintain any key man insurance for our managing directors at this time.

        In addition, we will need to expand and effectively manage our managerial, operational, financial, development and other resources in order to successfully pursue our research, development and commercialization efforts for our existing and future product candidates. Furthermore, replacing managing directors and key employees may be difficult and may take an extended period of time because of the limited number of individuals in our industry with the breadth of skills and experience required to successfully develop, gain regulatory approval of and commercialize products. Competition to hire from this limited pool is intense, and we may be unable to hire, train, retain or motivate these key personnel on acceptable terms given the competition among numerous pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for similar personnel. We also experience competition for the hiring of scientific and clinical personnel from universities and research institutions. In addition, we rely on consultants and advisors, including scientific and clinical advisors, to assist us in formulating our research and development and commercialization strategy. Our consultants and advisors may be employed by employers other than us and may have commitments under consulting or advisory contracts with other entities that may limit their availability to us. If we are unable to continue to attract and retain high quality personnel, our ability to pursue our growth strategy will be limited.

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We will need to grow our organization, specifically to expand our development and regulatory capabilities, and we may experience difficulties in managing this growth, which could disrupt operations.

        We have 163 employees (153 full time equivalents), including those of our subsidiaries. As our development and commercialization plans and strategies develop, we expect to expand our employee base on an as-needed basis. Future growth would impose significant added responsibilities on management, including the need to identify, recruit, maintain, motivate and integrate additional employees. Also, our management may need to divert a disproportionate amount of their attention away from day-to-day activities and devote a substantial amount of time to managing these growth activities. We may not be able to effectively manage the expansion of our operations which may result in weaknesses in our infrastructure, give rise to operational errors, loss of business opportunities, loss of employees and reduced productivity among remaining employees. Our expected growth could require significant capital expenditures and may divert financial resources from other projects, such as the development of existing and additional product candidates. If our management is unable to effectively manage our expected growth, our expenses may increase more than expected, our ability to generate and/or grow revenue could be reduced and we may not be able to implement our business strategy. Our future financial performance and our ability to commercialize our product candidates and compete effectively with others in our industry will depend, in part, on our ability to effectively manage future growth.

Risks Related to Our Common Shares

Our share price has been and may in the future be volatile, which could cause holders of our common shares to incur substantial losses.

        You should consider an investment in our common shares as risky and invest only if you can withstand a significant loss and wide fluctuations in the market value of your investment. Our share price has been, and in the future may again be subject to substantial price volatility. In addition, the stock market has recently experienced significant volatility, particularly with respect to pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences company stocks. The volatility of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences company stocks often does not relate to the operating performance of the companies represented by the stock. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common shares to fluctuate include:

    results and timing of our clinical studies and clinical studies of our competitors' products;

    failure or discontinuation of any of our development programs;

    issues in manufacturing our product candidates or future approved products;

    regulatory developments or enforcement in the United States and non-U.S. countries with respect to our product candidates or our competitors' products;

    failure to achieve pricing and/or reimbursement;

    competition from existing products or new products that may emerge;

    developments or disputes concerning patents or other proprietary rights;

    introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by us or our competitors;

    announcements by us, our collaborators or our competitors of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures, collaborations or capital commitments;

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    changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any cover our common shares;

    fluctuations in the valuation of companies perceived by investors to be comparable to us;

    public concern over our product candidates or any future approved products;

    litigation;

    future sales of our common shares;

    share price and volume fluctuations attributable to inconsistent trading volume levels of our shares;

    additions or departures of key personnel;

    changes in the structure of health care payment systems in the United States or overseas;

    failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

    economic and other external factors or other disasters or crises, including health epidemics;

    period-to-period fluctuations in our financial condition and results of operations, including the timing of receipt of any milestone or other payments under commercialization or licensing agreements;

    general market conditions and market conditions for biopharmaceutical stocks; and

    overall fluctuations in U.S. equity markets.

        In addition, in the past, when the market price of a stock has been volatile, holders of that stock have instituted securities class action litigation against the company that issued the stock. If any of our shareholders brought a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit and divert the time and attention of our management, which could seriously harm our business.

Future sales, or the possibility of future sales, of a substantial number of our common shares could adversely affect the price of the shares and dilute shareholders.

        Future sales of a substantial number of our common shares, or the perception that such sales will occur, could cause a decline in the market price of our common shares. We had approximately 119 million common shares outstanding as of March 31, 2021. If our existing shareholders sell substantial amounts of common shares in the public market, or the market perceives that such sales may occur, the market price of our common shares and our ability to raise capital through the issuance of equity securities in the future could be adversely affected. In addition, we have registered on a Form S-8 registration statement all common shares that we may issue under our equity compensation plans. As a result, these shares can be freely sold in the public market upon issuance, subject to volume limitations applicable to affiliates.

        On December 23, 2020, we filed a shelf registration statement on Form F-3 for the potential offer and sale by us of up to $225 million of our common shares, senior debt securities, subordinated debt securities, warrants, purchase contracts or units. The registration statement was declared effective by the SEC on December 30, 2020. We have also entered into a sales agreement to offer and sell up to $75 million of our common shares under a prior registration statement pursuant to an "at-the-market" offering. Because the price per share of each share sold under the registration statement will depend on the market price of our shares at the time of the sale and other market conditions, it is not possible at this stage to predict the number of shares that ultimately may be offered and sold under the registration statement. If we sell common shares, convertible securities or other equity securities, existing shareholders may be diluted by such sales, and in

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certain cases new investors could gain rights superior to our existing shareholders. Any sales of our common shares, or the perception that such sales could occur, could have a negative impact on the trading price of our shares.

We are a foreign private issuer and, as a result, we are not subject to U.S. proxy rules and are subject to Exchange Act reporting obligations that, to some extent, are more lenient and less frequent than those of a U.S. domestic public company.

        We report under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as a non-U.S. company with foreign private issuer status. Because we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act and although we are subject to Dutch laws and regulations with regard to such matters and intend to furnish quarterly financial information to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, we are exempt from certain provisions of the Exchange Act that are applicable to U.S. domestic public companies, including (i) the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act, (ii) the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their stock ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time and (iii) the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q containing unaudited financial and other specified information, or current reports on Form 8-K, upon the occurrence of specified significant events. In addition, foreign private issuers are not required to file their annual report on Form 20-F until four months after the end of each fiscal year, while U.S. domestic issuers that are accelerated filers are required to file their annual report on Form 10-K within 75 days after the end of each fiscal year. Foreign private issuers are also exempt from Regulation Fair Disclosure, aimed at preventing issuers from making selective disclosures of material information. As a result of the above, you may not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are not foreign private issuers.

As a foreign private issuer and as permitted by the listing requirements of Nasdaq, we follow certain home country governance practices rather than the corporate governance requirements of Nasdaq.

        We are a foreign private issuer. As a result, in accordance with the listing requirements of The Nasdaq Global Market, or Nasdaq, we follow home country governance requirements and certain exemptions thereunder rather than comply with the corporate governance requirements of Nasdaq. In accordance with Dutch law and generally accepted business practices, our Articles of Association do not provide quorum requirements generally applicable to general meetings of shareholders in the United States. To this extent, our practice varies from the requirement of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5620(c), which requires an issuer to provide in its bylaws for a generally applicable quorum, and that such quorum may not be less than one-third of the outstanding voting stock. Although we must provide shareholders with an agenda and other relevant documents for the general meeting of shareholders, Dutch law does not have a regulatory regime for the solicitation of proxies and the solicitation of proxies is not a generally accepted business practice in the Netherlands, thus our practice will vary from the requirement of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5620(b). As permitted by the listing requirements of Nasdaq, we have also opted out of the requirements of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(d), which requires, inter alia, an issuer to have a compensation committee that consists entirely of independent directors, and Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(e), which requires independent director oversight of director nominations. Also, Dutch law does not require that we disclose information regarding third party compensation of our directors or director nominees. As a result, our practice varies from the third-party compensation disclosure requirements of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5250(b)(3). In addition, we have opted out of shareholder approval requirements, as included in the Nasdaq Listing Rules, for the issuance of securities in connection with certain events such as the acquisition of stock or assets of another company, the establishment of or amendments to equity-based compensation plans for employees, a change of control of us and certain private placements. To this extent, our practice varies from the requirements of Nasdaq Rule 5635, which generally requires an issuer to obtain shareholder approval for the issuance of securities in connection with such events. Accordingly, you may not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are subject to these Nasdaq requirements.

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We may lose our foreign private issuer status which would then require us to comply with the Exchange Act's domestic reporting regime and cause us to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses.

        We are a foreign private issuer and therefore we are not required to comply with all of the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Exchange Act applicable to U.S. domestic issuers. If, in the future, we are not a foreign private issuer, as of the end of the second fiscal quarter in any fiscal year, we would be required to comply with all of the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Exchange Act applicable to U.S. domestic issuers in the subsequent fiscal year. In order to maintain our current status as a foreign private issuer, either (a) a majority of our common shares must be either directly or indirectly owned of record by non-residents of the United States or (b)(i) a majority of our managing directors or supervisory directors may not be United States citizens or residents, (ii) more than 50 percent of our assets cannot be located in the United States and (iii) our business must be administered principally outside the United States. If we were to lose this status, we would be required to comply with the Exchange Act reporting and other requirements applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, which are more detailed and extensive than the requirements for foreign private issuers. We may also be required to make changes in our corporate governance practices in accordance with various SEC and stock exchange rules. The regulatory and compliance costs to us under U.S. securities laws if we are required to comply with the reporting requirements applicable to a U.S. domestic issuer may be significantly higher than the cost we would incur as a foreign private issuer. As a result, we expect that a loss of foreign private issuer status would increase our legal and financial compliance costs and would make some activities highly time consuming and costly. We also expect that if we were required to comply with the rules and regulations applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, it would make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage. These rules and regulations could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified supervisory directors.

We are a Dutch public company with limited liability. The rights of our shareholders may be different from the rights of shareholders in companies governed by the laws of U.S. jurisdictions and may not protect investors in a similar fashion afforded by incorporation in a U.S. jurisdiction.

        We are a Dutch public company with limited liability (naamloze vennootschap) organized under the laws of the Netherlands. Our corporate affairs are governed by our Articles of Association and by the laws governing companies incorporated in the Netherlands. However, there can be no assurance that Dutch law will not change in the future or that it will serve to protect investors in a similar fashion afforded under corporate law principles in the United States, which could adversely affect the rights of investors.

        The rights of shareholders and the responsibilities of managing directors and supervisory directors may be different from the rights and obligations of shareholders and board members in companies governed by the laws of U.S. jurisdictions. In the performance of its duties, our management board and supervisory board are required by Dutch law to consider the interests of our company, its shareholders, its employees and other stakeholders, in all cases with due observation of the principles of reasonableness and fairness. It is possible that some of these parties will have interests that are different from, or in addition to, your interests as a shareholder.

        Our authorized share capital increased as of June 19, 2018, following an amendment of our Articles of Association approved by a resolution of the general meeting of shareholders. On August 4, 2020, following an amendment of our Articles of Association, approved by a resolution of the general meeting of shareholders, the composition of our authorized share capital was amended, and the cumulative preferred shares included in the share capital were abolished and converted into

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common shares. Our authorized share capital currently amounts to €3,119,500, comprised of 311,950,000 common shares, each with a nominal value of €0.01.

Provisions of our Articles of Association or Dutch corporate law might deter acquisition bids for us that might be considered favorable and prevent or frustrate any attempt to replace or remove the then management board and supervisory board.

        Certain provisions of our Articles of Association may make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us or effect a change in our management board or supervisory board. These provisions include: staggered maximum four-year terms of our supervisory directors; a provision that our managing directors and supervisory directors may only be removed by the general meeting of shareholders by a two-thirds majority of votes cast representing more than 50% of our outstanding share capital (unless the removal was proposed by the supervisory board); and a requirement that certain matters, including an amendment of our Articles of Association, may only be brought to our shareholders for a vote upon a proposal by our management board that has been approved by our supervisory board.

We are not obligated to and do not comply with all the best practice provisions of the Dutch Corporate Governance Code. This may affect your rights as a shareholder.

        As a Dutch company we are subject to the Dutch Corporate Governance Code, or DCGC. The DCGC contains both principles and best practice provisions that regulate relations between the management board, the supervisory board and the shareholders (i.e., the general meeting of shareholders). The DCGC is based on a "comply or explain" principle. Accordingly, companies are required to disclose in their annual reports, filed in the Netherlands, whether they comply with the provisions of the DCGC. If they do not comply with those provisions (e.g., because of a conflicting Nasdaq requirement), the company is required to give the reasons for such non-compliance.

        The DCGC applies to all Dutch companies listed on a government-recognized stock exchange, whether in the Netherlands or elsewhere, including Nasdaq. We do not comply with all the best practice provisions of the DCGC. In our annual report for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, we will report on our compliance with the DCGC. This may affect your rights as a shareholder and you may not have the same level of protection as a shareholder in a Dutch company that fully complies with the DCGC.

Claims of U.S. civil liabilities may not be enforceable against us.

        We are incorporated under the laws of the Netherlands, and our headquarters are located in Germany. Substantially all of our assets are located outside the United States. The majority of our managing directors and supervisory directors reside outside the United States. As a result, it may not be possible for investors to effect service of process within the United States upon such persons or to enforce against them or us in U.S. courts, including judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States.

        The United States and the Netherlands currently do not have a treaty providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments, other than arbitration awards, in civil and commercial matters. Consequently, a final judgment for payment given by a court in the United States, whether or not predicated solely upon U.S. securities laws, would not automatically be recognized or enforceable in the Netherlands. In order to obtain a judgment which is enforceable in the Netherlands, the party in whose favor a final and conclusive judgment of the U.S. court has been rendered will be required to file its claim with a court of competent jurisdiction in the Netherlands. Such party may submit to the Dutch court the final judgment rendered by the U.S. court. If and to the extent that the Dutch court finds that the jurisdiction of the U.S. court has been based on

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grounds which are internationally acceptable, that the proceedings before the U.S. court complied with principles of proper procedures, that recognition and/or enforcement of such judgment would not contravene the public policy of the Netherlands, and that recognition and/or enforcement of the judgment is not irreconcilable with a decision of a Dutch court rendered between the same parties or with an earlier decision of a foreign court rendered between the same parties in a dispute that is about the same subject matter and that is based on the same cause, provided that earlier judgment can be recognized in the Netherlands, the court of the Netherlands will, in principle, give binding effect to the judgment of the U.S. court. Dutch courts may deny the recognition and enforcement of punitive damages or other awards on the basis that recognition and enforcement would contravene public policy of the Netherlands. Moreover, a Dutch court may reduce the amount of damages granted by a U.S. court and recognize damages only to the extent that they are necessary to compensate actual losses or damages. In addition, there is doubt as to whether a Dutch court would impose civil liability on us, our managing directors or supervisory directors or certain experts named herein in an original action predicated solely upon the U.S. federal securities laws brought in a court of competent jurisdiction in the Netherlands against us or such directors or experts, respectively. Enforcement and recognition of judgments of U.S. courts in the Netherlands are solely governed by the provisions of the Dutch Civil Procedure Code.

        The United States and Germany currently do not have a treaty providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments, other than arbitration awards, in civil and commercial matters. Consequently, a final judgment for payment given by a court in the United States, whether or not predicated solely upon U.S. securities laws, would not automatically be recognized or enforceable in Germany. German courts may deny the recognition and enforcement of a judgment rendered by a U.S. court if they consider the U.S. court not to be competent or the decision not in line with German public policy principles. For example, recognition of court decisions based on class actions brought in the United States typically raises public policy concerns and judgments awarding punitive damages are generally not enforceable in Germany.

        In addition, actions brought in a German court against us, our managing directors or supervisory directors, our senior management and the experts named herein to enforce liabilities based on U.S. federal securities laws may be subject to certain restrictions. In particular, German courts generally do not award punitive damages. Litigation in Germany is also subject to rules of procedure that differ from the U.S. rules, including with respect to the taking and admissibility of evidence, the conduct of the proceedings and the allocation of costs. Proceedings in Germany would have to be conducted in the German language and all documents submitted to the court would, in principle, have to be translated into German. For these reasons, it may be difficult for a U.S. investor to bring an original action in a German court predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws against us, our managing directors or supervisory directors, our senior management and the experts named in this Annual Report.

        Based on the lack of a treaty as described above, U.S. investors may not be able to enforce against us or managing directors or supervisory directors, officers or certain experts named herein who are residents of the Netherlands, Germany, or other countries other than the United States any judgments obtained in U.S. courts in civil and commercial matters, including judgments under the U.S. federal securities laws.

If we fail to maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results or prevent fraud. As a result, shareholders could lose confidence in our financial and other public reporting, which would harm our business and the trading price of our common shares.

        Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and, together with adequate disclosure controls and procedures, are designed to

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prevent fraud. Any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation could cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations. In addition, any testing by us conducted in connection with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or any subsequent testing by our independent registered public accounting firm, may reveal deficiencies in our internal controls over financial reporting that are deemed to be material weaknesses or that may require prospective or retroactive changes to our financial statements or identify other areas for further attention or improvement. Inferior internal controls could also impair our ability to raise revenue, result in the loss of investor confidence in the reliability of our financial statements and subject us to regulatory scrutiny and sanctions, which in turn could harm the market value of our common shares.

        We are required to disclose changes made in our internal controls and procedures and our management is required to assess the effectiveness of these controls annually. As September 17, 2019 represented the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of our common shares pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act, we no longer qualify as an "emerging growth company" as defined in the JOBS Act, commencing December 31, 2019. As a result, our independent registered public accounting firm is required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404. An independent assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls could detect problems that our management's assessment might not. Undetected material weaknesses in our internal controls could lead to financial statement restatements and require us to incur the expense of remediation.

Changes in accounting standards could impact our results.

        The IASB, or other regulatory bodies, periodically introduce modifications to financial accounting and reporting standards or issue new financial accounting and reporting standards under which we prepare our consolidated financial statements. These changes can materially impact the means by which we report financial information, affecting our results of operations. Also, we could be required to apply new or revised standards retroactively.

        IFRS 9 "Financial Instruments" and IFRS 15 "Revenues from Contracts with Customers" went into effect on January 1, 2018 and IFRS 16 "Leases" went into effect on January 1, 2019. With respect to the first time adoption of IFRS 9 and IFRS 15, any transition effects are described in note 3 to the consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2018. With respect to IFRS 16, during 2018, we completed the assessment of the impact of IFRS 16 on our consolidated financial statements and have identified our leases including contractual payments, renewal options and other terms. Any transition effects are described in note 4 to our consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2019. The first time adoption of IFRS 16 has not substantially affected our results of operations.

Although we do not believe we were a "passive foreign investment company" (a "PFIC") in 2020, we may be a PFIC in 2021 or one or more future taxable years. A U.S. investor may suffer adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences if we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which the U.S. investor holds common shares.

        Under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, or the Code, we will be a PFIC for any taxable year in which, after the application of certain "look-through" rules with respect to subsidiaries, either (i) 75% or more of our gross income consists of "passive income," or (ii) 50% or more of the average quarterly value of our assets consist of assets that produce, or are held for the production of, "passive income." Passive income generally includes interest, dividends, rents, certain non-active royalties and capital gains. Although we have not performed a definitive PFIC analysis using U.S. federal income tax principles, based on certain estimates as to composition of our income and assets, including the implied value, based on our market capitalization, of our assets that

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produce non-passive income, during 2020, we do not believe that we were a PFIC for our 2020 taxable year. However, there can be no assurance that the Internal Revenue Service, or the IRS, will agree with our conclusion. In addition, whether we will be a PFIC in 2021 or any future taxable year is uncertain because, among other things, we currently own a substantial amount of passive assets, including cash, and because the valuation of our assets that generate non-passive income for PFIC purposes, including our intangible assets, is uncertain and may vary substantially over time and the composition of our assets and income may vary substantially over time. The average quarterly value of our assets for purposes of determining our PFIC status for any taxable year (to the extent applicable) will generally be determined in part by reference to our market capitalization, which has fluctuated and may continue to fluctuate significantly over time. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that we will not be a PFIC for any future taxable year. In addition, we may, directly or indirectly, hold equity interests in other entities, including certain of our subsidiaries that are PFICs, or "Lower-tier PFICs."

        If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. investor holds common shares, we generally will continue to be treated as a PFIC with respect to that U.S. investor for all succeeding years during which the U.S. investor holds common shares, even if we cease to meet the threshold requirements for PFIC status. Such a U.S. investor may be subject to adverse tax consequences, including (i) the treatment of all or a portion of any gain on disposition as ordinary income, (ii) the application of a deferred interest charge on such gain and the receipt of certain dividends and (iii) compliance with certain reporting requirements. To avoid the application of the foregoing rules, a U.S. investor can make an election to treat us and each Lower-tier PFIC as a qualified electing fund (a "QEF Election") in the first taxable year that we and each Lower-tier PFIC are treated as PFICs with respect to the U.S. investor. We currently intend to provide the information necessary for a U.S. investor to make a QEF Election with respect to us and each Lower-tier PFIC that we control for 2021 and for any future years with respect to which we determine that we or any Lower-tier PFIC that we control are or are likely to be a PFIC. A U.S. investor can also avoid certain of the adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences described above by making a mark-to-market election with respect to its common shares, provided that the common shares are "marketable." U.S. investors should consult their tax advisers regarding the availability and advisability of making a QEF Election or a mark-to-market election in their particular circumstances. See "Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations" for further information regarding the consequences to a U.S. investor if we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which the U.S. investor holds common shares.

Any future dividends distributed by the Company to certain related parties in low-taxed jurisdictions might in the future become subject to an additional Dutch withholding tax on dividends.

        Under current Dutch tax law, dividends paid on shares are in principle subject to Dutch dividend withholding tax at a rate of 15% under the Dutch Dividend Withholding Tax Act 1965 (Wet op de dividendbelasting 1965), unless a domestic or treaty exemption or reduction applies. On September 25, 2020, the Dutch Ministry of Finance published a draft bill for internet consultation that introduces an additional withholding tax on certain dividends paid within a group. The withholding tax will be applicable to dividends paid to group entities in low-taxed jurisdictions or certain hybrid group entities. The rate will be as high as the highest Dutch corporate income tax rate (currently 25%) at the time of the dividend payment. Any future dividends distributed by us on our shares may become subject to this additional Dutch withholding tax. The formal bill is expected to be submitted in the spring of 2021, which would be effective as of January 1, 2024. The proposed measures will be discussed in Dutch parliament and may be subject to amendment.

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General Risk Factors

If any product liability lawsuits are successfully brought against us or any of our collaborators, we may incur substantial liabilities and may be required to limit commercialization of our product candidates.

        We face an inherent risk of product liability lawsuits related to the testing of our product candidates in seriously ill patients, and will face an even greater risk if product candidates are approved by regulatory authorities and introduced commercially. Despite mandatory product liability insurances in the countries in which we are conducting our clinical studies, we cannot exclude that any claims will be brought against us or our collaborators although product liability claims by participants enrolled in our clinical studies will be usually covered by our insurances. If we cannot successfully defend ourselves against any such claims, we may incur substantial liabilities. Regardless of their merit or eventual outcome, liability claims may result in:

    decreased demand for our future approved products;

    injury to our reputation;

    withdrawal of clinical study participants;

    termination of clinical study sites or entire trial programs;

    increased regulatory scrutiny;

    significant litigation costs;

    substantial monetary awards to or costly settlement with patients or other claimants;

    product recalls or a change in the indications for which they may be used;

    loss of revenue;

    diversion of management and scientific resources from our business operations; and

    the inability to commercialize our product candidates.

        If any of our product candidates are approved for commercial sale, we will be highly dependent upon consumer perceptions of us and the safety and quality of our products. We could be adversely affected if we are subject to negative publicity. We could also be adversely affected if any of our products or any similar products distributed by other companies prove to be, or are asserted to be, harmful to patients. Because of our dependence upon consumer perceptions, any adverse publicity associated with illness or other adverse effects resulting from patients' use or misuse of our products or any similar products distributed by other companies could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition or results of operations.

        We have insurance, but our current insurance coverage and any additional coverage for further clinical studies may not be adequate to cover all liabilities that we may incur. We may need to increase and expand our insurance coverage when we begin the commercialization of our product candidates. Insurance coverage is becoming increasingly expensive. As a result, we may be unable to maintain or obtain sufficient insurance at a reasonable cost to protect us against losses that could have a material adverse effect on our business. A successful product liability claim or series of claims brought against us, particularly if judgments exceed any insurance coverage we may have, could decrease our cash resources and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operation.

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Exchange rate fluctuations may materially affect our results of operations and financial condition.

        Potential future revenue may be derived from abroad, particularly from the United States. As a result, our business and share price may be affected by fluctuations in foreign exchange rates between the euro and these other currencies, which may also have a significant impact on our reported results of operations and cash flows from period to period, such as the U.S. dollar. We have converted into euros only the portion of the proceeds from our financings and our research collaboration and license agreement with Genentech that we expect will be spent in euros according to our budget. If the projected payments in either euro or U.S. dollar change, we may be subject to foreign exchange-rate risk. Currently, we do not have any other exchange rate hedging measures in place.

Future acquisitions, strategic investments, partnerships or alliances could be difficult to integrate and/or identify, divert the attention of key management personnel, disrupt our business, dilute shareholder value and/or adversely affect our financial results.

        We may consider entering into partnerships or into acquisitions of other companies, businesses, assets or technologies that are complementary to our business and operations as part of our growth strategy. Acquisitions, partnerships, alliances and subsequent integrations thereof would require significant managerial, operational and financial resources and could result in a diversion of resources from our existing business, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our growth and business operations. We must necessarily base any assessment of potential acquisitions, partnerships or alliances on assumptions with respect to operations, profitability and other matters that may subsequently prove to be incorrect. Future acquisitions and alliances, as well as other investments, may not produce anticipated synergies or perform in accordance with our expectations. The cost and duration of integrating newly acquired businesses could also materially exceed our expectations. It is also possible that we may not identify suitable acquisition targets, strategic investments or partnership candidates. Our inability to identify such opportunities, or our inability to complete such transactions, may negatively affect our competitiveness and growth prospects. Any of these developments could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our patents, which could be expensive, time consuming and unsuccessful.

        Even after they have issued, our patents and any patents which we license may be challenged, narrowed, invalidated or circumvented. If our patents are invalidated or otherwise limited or will expire prior to the commercialization of our product candidates, other companies may be better able to develop products that compete with ours, which could adversely affect our competitive business position, business prospects and financial condition.

        The following are examples of litigation and other adversarial proceedings or disputes that we could become a party to involving our patents or patents licensed to us:

    we or our collaborators may initiate litigation or other proceedings against third parties to enforce our patent rights;

    third parties may initiate litigation or other proceedings seeking to invalidate patents owned by or licensed to us or to obtain a declaratory judgment that their product or technology does not infringe our patents or patents licensed to us;

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    third parties may initiate opposition or re-examination proceedings challenging the validity or scope of our patent rights, requiring us or our collaborators and/or licensors to participate in such proceedings to defend the validity and scope of our patents;

    there may be a challenge or dispute regarding inventorship or ownership of patents currently identified as being owned by or licensed to us;

    the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office may initiate an interference between patents or patent applications owned by or licensed to us and those of our competitors, requiring us or our collaborators and/or licensors to participate in an interference proceeding to determine the priority of invention, which could jeopardize our patent rights; or

    third parties may seek approval to market biosimilar versions of our future approved products prior to expiration of relevant patents owned by or licensed to us, requiring us to defend our patents, including by filing lawsuits alleging patent infringement.

        These lawsuits and proceedings would be costly and could affect our results of operations and divert the attention of our managerial and scientific personnel. There is a risk that a court or administrative body would decide that our patents are invalid or not infringed by a third party's activities, or that the scope of certain issued claims must be further limited. An adverse outcome in a litigation or proceeding involving our own patents could limit our ability to assert our patents against these or other competitors, affect our ability to receive royalties or other licensing consideration from our licensees, and may curtail or preclude our ability to exclude third parties from making, using and selling similar or competitive products. Any of these occurrences could adversely affect our competitive business position, business prospects and financial condition.

        The degree of future protection for our proprietary rights is uncertain because legal means afford only limited protection and may not adequately protect our rights or permit us to gain or keep our competitive advantage. For example:

    others may be able to develop a platform that is similar to, or better than, ours in a way that is not covered by the claims of our patents;

    others may be able to make compounds that are similar to our product candidates but that are not covered by the claims of our patents;

    we might not have been the first to make the inventions covered by patents or pending patent applications;

    we might not have been the first to file patent applications for these inventions;

    any patents that we obtain may not provide us with any competitive advantages or may ultimately be found invalid or unenforceable; or

    we may not develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable.

If our trademarks and trade names are not adequately protected, then we may not be able to build name recognition in our markets of interest and our business may be adversely affected.

        Our registered or unregistered trademarks or trade names may be challenged, infringed, circumvented or declared generic or determined to be infringing on other marks. We may not be able to protect our rights to these trademarks and trade names, which we need to build name recognition by potential partners or customers in our markets of interest. Over the long term, if we are unable to establish name recognition based on our trademarks and trade names, then we may not be able to compete effectively, and our business may be adversely affected.

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We may not be successful in obtaining or maintaining necessary rights to our product candidates through acquisitions and in-licenses.

        We currently have rights to the intellectual property, through licenses from third parties and under patents that we own, to develop our product candidates. Because our programs may require the use of proprietary rights held by third parties, the growth of our business will likely depend in part on our ability to acquire, in-license, maintain or use these proprietary rights. In addition, our product candidates may require specific formulations to work effectively and efficiently and the rights to these formulations may be held by others. We may be unable to acquire or in-license any compositions, methods of use, processes, or other third-party intellectual property rights from third parties that we identify as necessary for our product candidates. The licensing and acquisition of third-party intellectual property rights is a competitive area, and a number of more established companies are also pursuing strategies to license or acquire third-party intellectual property rights that we may consider attractive. These established companies may have a competitive advantage over us due to their size, cash resources, and greater clinical development and commercialization capabilities.

        For example, we sometimes collaborate with U.S. and non-U.S. academic institutions to accelerate our preclinical research or development under written agreements with these institutions. Typically, these institutions provide us with an option to negotiate a license to any of the institution's rights in technology resulting from the collaboration. Regardless of such option, we may be unable to negotiate a license within the specified timeframe or under terms that are acceptable to us. If we are unable to do so, the institution may offer the intellectual property rights to other parties, potentially blocking our ability to pursue our applicable product candidate or program.

        In addition, companies that perceive us to be a competitor may be unwilling to assign or license rights to us. We also may be unable to license or acquire third-party intellectual property rights on terms that would allow us to make an appropriate return on our investment. If we are unable to successfully obtain a license to third-party intellectual property rights necessary for the development of a product candidate or program, we may have to abandon development of that product candidate or program and our business and financial condition could suffer.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property rights throughout the world.

        Filing, prosecuting, and defending patents on product candidates in all countries throughout the world would be prohibitively expensive, and our intellectual property rights in some countries outside the United States can be less extensive than those in the United States and Europe. In addition, the laws of some countries outside the United States and Europe, such as China, do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as federal and state laws in the United States and laws in Europe. Consequently, we may not be able to prevent third parties from practicing our inventions in all countries outside the United States and Europe, or from selling or importing products made using our inventions in and into the United States, Europe or other jurisdictions. As part of ordinary course prosecution and maintenance activities, we determine whether and in which countries to seek patent protection outside the United States and Europe. This also applies to patents we have acquired or in-licensed from third parties. In some cases, this means that we, or our predecessors in interest or licensors of patents within our portfolio, have sought patent protection in a limited number of countries for patents covering our product candidates. Competitors may use our technologies in jurisdictions where we have not obtained or are unable to adequately enforce patent protection to develop their own products and further, may export otherwise infringing products to territories where we have patent protection, but enforcement is not as strong as that in the United States and Europe. These products may compete with our products and our patents or other intellectual property rights may not be effective or sufficient to prevent them from competing.

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        Many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending intellectual property rights in jurisdictions outside the United States and Europe. The legal systems of certain countries, particularly certain developing countries, do not favor the enforcement of patents, trade secrets, and other intellectual property protection, particularly those relating to biotechnology products, which could make it difficult for us to stop the infringement of our patents, the reproduction of our manufacturing or other know-how or marketing of competing products in violation of our proprietary rights generally. Proceedings to enforce our patent rights in jurisdictions outside the United States and Europe, whether or not successful, could result in substantial costs and divert our efforts and attention from other aspects of our business, could put our patents at risk of being invalidated or interpreted narrowly and our patent applications at risk of not issuing and could provoke third parties to assert claims against us. We may not prevail in any lawsuits that we initiate, and the damages or other remedies awarded, if any, may not be commercially meaningful. Accordingly, our efforts to enforce our intellectual property rights around the world may be inadequate to obtain a significant commercial advantage from the intellectual property that we develop or license.

We do not anticipate paying cash dividends, and accordingly, shareholders must rely on stock appreciation for any return on their investment.

        We currently intend to retain our future earnings, if any, to fund the development and growth of our businesses. As a result, capital appreciation, if any, of our common shares will be your sole source of gain on your investment for the foreseeable future. Investors seeking cash dividends should not invest in our common shares.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price and trading volume could decline.

        The trading market for our common shares depends on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. We do not have any control over these analysts. We cannot assure you that analysts will cover us or provide favorable coverage. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade our shares or change their opinion of our shares, our share price would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our share price or trading volume to decline.

ITEM 4.    INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

A.  History and development of the company

        We are a clinical-stage immuno-oncology company focused on discovering and developing highly targeted cancer immunotherapies. Our product candidates represent an innovative approach to cancer treatment that seeks to harness the body's own immune defenses to fight tumor cells. The most potent cells of the human defense arsenal are types of white blood cells called innate immune cells (Natural Killer cells, or NK cells, and macrophages) and T cells. Leveraging our fit-for-purpose ROCK® platform, we develop proprietary, next-generation bispecific antibodies, so-called innate cell engagers, which are designed to direct innate immune cells and establish a bridge to cancer cells. Our innate cell engagers have the ability to bring innate immune cells into the proximity of tumor cells and trigger an activation cascade that leads to the destruction of cancer cells. Due to their novel tetravalent architecture with four binding domains, our innate cell engagers bind to their targets with high affinity. Different dosing schemes are being explored to allow for improved exposure in heavily pretreated patient populations. Based on their mechanism of action as well as the preclinical and clinical data we have generated to date, we believe that our product candidates as monotherapy and / or in combination, may ultimately improve response rates, clinical outcomes and survival in

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cancer patients, and could eventually become a cornerstone of modern targeted oncology care. Building on our leadership in the innate cell engager space, we are also developing novel antibody formats with the potential to tailor innate cell-engaging therapy to different indications and settings.

        Affimed was founded in 2000 based on technology developed by the group led by Professor Melvyn Little at Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), the German Cancer Research Center, in Heidelberg, Germany.

        Focusing our efforts on antibodies that specifically bind to innate cells through CD16A, a key activating receptor, we have built a clinical and preclinical pipeline of innate cell-engaging bispecific antibodies designed to activate both innate and adaptive immunity. Compared to a variety of T cell-engaging technologies, our innate cell engagers appear to have a better safety profile and have the potential to achieve more potent and deeper immune responses potentially through enhancing crosstalk of innate to adaptive immunity. The safety profiles of our molecules make them suitable for development as combination therapies (e.g. with checkpoint inhibitors, or CPIs, adoptive NK cells or cytokines).

        We are focusing our research and development efforts on three programs, for which we retain full global commercial rights, AFM13, AFM24 and AFM28. Because our tetravalent bispecific antibodies can be engineered to bind to different antigens that are known to be present on various cancer cells, our product candidates could be developed for the treatment of different cancer indications. We intend to clinically develop our product candidates to treat high medical need indications, including as a salvage therapy for patients who have relapsed after treatment with standard therapies, or patients who are refractory to these therapies, meaning they do not respond to treatment with standard therapies, whom we collectively refer to as relapsed/refractory patients. These patients have limited life expectancy and few therapeutic options. We believe this strategy will allow for a faster path to approval and will likely require smaller clinical studies compared to indications with more therapeutic options and larger patient populations. We believe such specialized market segments in oncology can be effectively targeted with a small and dedicated marketing and sales team. We currently intend to establish a commercial sales force in the United States and/or Europe to commercialize our product candidates when and if they are approved.

        We also see an opportunity in the clinical development of our innate cell engagers in combination with other agents that harness the immune system to fight cancer cells, such as CPIs, adoptive NK cell transfer and cytokines. Such combinations of cancer immunotherapies may ultimately prove beneficial for larger patient populations in earlier stages of diseases, beyond the relapsed/refractory disease setting.

        Our main offices and laboratories are located at the Technology Park adjacent to the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, where we employ 112 people, approximately 66% of whom have an advanced academic degree. Including AbCheck (see description below) and Affimed Inc. personnel, our total headcount is 163 (153 full time equivalents). We are led by experienced executives with a track record of successful product development, approvals and launches, specifically in the area of biologics and biopharmaceuticals. Our supervisory board is made up of highly experienced experts from the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, including individuals with a background and expertise in hematological malignancies.

        In 2009, we formed AbCheck s.r.o., our 100% owned, independently run antibody screening platform company, located in the Czech Republic. AbCheck is devoted to the generation and optimization of fully human antibodies. Its technologies include a naïve human antibody library combined with phage and yeast display antibody library, a proprietary algorithm to optimize affinity, stability and manufacturing efficiency and a mass humanization technology to discover and optimize high-quality human antibodies. In addition to providing candidates for Affimed projects, AbCheck is recognized for its expertise in antibody discovery throughout the United States and Europe and has

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been working with globally active pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies such as Tusk Therapeutics, bluebird bio, Eli Lilly, Daiichi Sankyo, Pierre Fabre, Icosagen and others.

        Our legal and commercial name is Affimed N.V. and we are a public company with limited liability (naamloze vennootschap) incorporated under Dutch law. Our principal executive offices are located at Technologiepark, Im Neuenheimer Feld 582, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany, and our telephone number is (+49) 6221-6743-60.

        The SEC maintains an Internet website that contains reports and other information about issuers, like us, that file electronically with the SEC. The address of that website is www.sec.gov. Our website can be found at www.affimed.com. The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report, and you should not consider information contained on our website to be a part of this Annual Report.

B.  Business overview

Our Strategy

        Our goal is to develop new treatment options for patients in need by activating innate immunity (e.g. NK cells and macrophages), the body's first line of defense, to fight cancer. We are developing single and combination therapies to treat a variety of cancers. Our novel proprietary antibody platform, ROCK®, delivers several unique types of next-generation tetravalent antibody formats, including bispecific and trispecific innate cell engagers. Based on the distinctive properties and mechanism of action of these products, which have demonstrated preclinical and / or clinical activity, we believe that our product candidates, alone or in combination, could eventually become a key element of improving clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Key elements of our strategy to achieve this goal are to:

    Rapidly advance the development of our clinical stage product candidates using a three-pronged development approach, including development (i) as monotherapy, (ii) in combination with adoptive NK cells, and (iii) in combinations with immunotherapies such as checkpoint inhibitors;

    Establish R&D and commercialization capabilities in Europe and in the United States;

    Use our technology platforms and intellectual property portfolio to continue to build our cancer immunotherapy pipeline;

    Maximize the value of our collaboration arrangements with LLS, The MD Anderson Cancer Center, Genentech and Roivant, and establish new collaborations;

    Intensify our collaboration with academia; and

    Utilize AbCheck to generate and optimize antibodies.

Our Strengths

        We believe we are a leader in developing cancer immunotherapies due to several factors:

    Our lead product candidate, AFM13, is a first-in-class innate cell engager for hematologic cancer indications;

    Our development candidate, AFM24, is a first-in-class innate cell engager for solid tumor indications;

    Our modular and versatile ROCK® platform, which we believe will enable future product candidates and collaborations with pharmaceutical companies;

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    We retain global commercial rights for AFM13, AFM24 and AFM28;

    Our experienced management team has a strong track record in the development and commercialization of new medicines; and

    We have a strong technology base and solid patent portfolio in the field of targeted immuno-oncology.

Our Research and Development Pipeline

        We are developing a pipeline of innate cell engagers for the treatment of cancer as shown below:

GRAPHIC

        Our most advanced candidate, AFM13, is a first-in-class innate cell engager designed for the treatment of certain CD30-positive (CD30+) malignancies, including T cell lymphomas. AFM13 selectively binds to CD30, a clinically validated target, and CD16A, an integral membrane glycoprotein receptor expressed on the surface of NK cells and macrophages, triggering a signal cascade that leads to the destruction of CD30-positive tumor cells. In contrast to conventional full-length antibodies, AFM13 does not bind to CD16B, which prevents binding to other cell types, e.g., neutrophils, and binds with equal affinity to CD16A polymorphisms at position 158. Furthermore, AFM13 binds CD16A with an approximately 1000-fold higher affinity than monoclonal antibodies thereby significantly increasing potency and efficacy as preclinically demonstrated. AFM13 is currently being investigated as monotherapy in a phase 2 registration-directed study in patients with relapsed/refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), and in combination with adoptive NK cells in a Phase 1 clinical study in collaboration with the MD Anderson Cancer Center.

        Our second candidate, AFM24, is a tetravalent, bispecific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-and CD16A-binding innate cell engager. AFM24 is designed to address limitations, such as toxicities or treatment resistance, associated with current therapeutic anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, while also offering the potential for better efficacy and safety by using activation of innate immunity to target EGFR-expressing solid tumors rather than inhibition of EGFR-mediated signal transduction. AFM24 is currently being investigated as monotherapy in a first-in-human phase 1/2a

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study, and we intend to commence two clinical studies investigating AFM24 in combination with adoptive NK cells and a PD-L1 inhibitor, respectively, in the second half of 2021.

        Our third wholly-owned ICE® molecule, AFM28, was selected from our ROCK® platform for an undisclosed target. The selection of AFM28 followed our evaluation of oncology indications with a high level of innate immune cell activity, and where there was past clinical experience with therapeutic antibodies and antibody drug conjugates. We advanced AFM28 into preclinical studies in 2020 and expect to submit an IND application in the first half of 2022.

        In August 2018, we entered into a research collaboration and license agreement with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, for the development and commercialization of certain product candidates that contain novel NK cell engager-based immunotherapeutics to treat multiple cancers. The agreement included a license to AFM26, a tetravalent, bispecific B cell maturation antigen (BCMA)- and CD16A-binding innate cell engager from our fit-for-purpose ROCK® platform, for the treatment of multiple myeloma. AFM26 is now known as RO7297089. RO7297089 employs a unique mechanism of action through high affinity engagement of NK cells and has demonstrated in vitro efficacy against cells with very low levels of BCMA expression. NK cell binding of RO7297089 is largely unaffected by IgG competition. During 2020, Genetech initiated a phase I study for RO7297089.

        AFM32 is another ICE® candidate in preclinical development against an undisclosed target. In November 2020, we announced a License and Strategic Collaboration with Roivant Sciences Ltd. ("Roivant"), pursuant to which we granted Roivant a license to develop and commercialize AFM32 and options to license additional novel ICE® molecules against other targets.

        We believe that our collaborations help to validate and more rapidly advance our discovery efforts, technology platforms and product candidates, and will enable us to leverage our platforms through additional high-value partnerships. As part of our business development strategy, we aim to enter into additional research collaborations in order to derive further value from our platform and more fully realize its potential.

COVID-19

        In response to the recent COVID-19 pandemic, we have implemented mitigation procedures to ensure the safety of trial participants and healthcare professionals and that drug supply and other trial-related materials are ready and available for patients enrolled in our clinical trials. We are closely monitoring and adhering to relevant federal and local guidelines on COVID-19 to ensure the safety and health of our global workforce and help limit the spread of COVID-19, while maintaining business continuity. We mandated a work-from-home policy for all employees not involved in preclinical research, and adjusted operations for laboratory personnel at our headquarters in Heidelberg, Germany. In addition, we eliminated nonessential travel to minimize exposure to COVID-19. We will continue to work closely with clinical sites as well as respective competent authorities to ensure the safety of trial participants and healthcare professionals, as well as the appropriate use of healthcare resources during the COVID-19 pandemic, while preserving the conduct and data integrity of our clinical studies.

        At this time, our contract manufacturers are operating without interruption, and there is sufficient material for the AFM13 phase 2 registration-directed study in PTCL, the investigator sponsored trial of cord blood-derived allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells in combination with AFM13, and the ongong AFM24 phase 1/2a monotherapy clinical study. Our assessment of the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patient enrollment and site activation in our clinical studies is ongoing and we will update trial timelines once we have more visibility on the length and extent of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Immune System and Cancer Background

Immune System

        The human immune system is characterized by an early, nonspecific initial response called innate immunity, and a highly specific response adapted to pathogenic or tumorigenic antigenes called adaptive immunity. Although the human immune system is normally capable of recognizing foreign or aberrant cells, cancer cells have developed highly effective ways to escape the surveillance and defense mechanisms of the immune system. As a result, immune cells such as NK cells and macrophages (parts of the innate immune system) and T cells (a part of the adaptive immune system) cannot recognize tumor cells as foreign or aberrant and therefore cannot fight them.

    NK cells: NK cells are important mediators of the innate immune system and can display cytotoxic, or cell-killing, activity against "altered self" (virus-infected and cancerous) cells. They were named "natural killers" because they recognize altered structures without the need for antigen processing and presentation. NK cells possess a large number of receptors that activate NK cells to destroy deviant cells.

    Macrophages: Macrophages are mature monocytes that are present in all tissues and patrol the body in order to engulf and digest microorganisms, dead cells or cellular debris in a process called phagocytosis. In this role they are an important first line of defense of innate immunity and very important for inducing inflammation, secreting signaling molecules and presenting antigens to adaptive immune cells, all being important for the induction of immune responses.

    T cells: T cells are part of the adaptive immune system and only target cells that present an antigen on their surface which has been presented before to the T cells by so-called antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. The antigen presentation triggers a biological cascade, resulting in the clonal expansion of antigen-specific T cells.

        Better understanding of the fundamentals of cellular and molecular tumor immunology has identified many ways by which the immune system can be augmented to treat cancer, including priming/boosting of the immune system, T cell modulation, reducing immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and enhancing adaptive immunity. This new area of medicine, termed cancer immunotherapy, has the potential to offer adaptable and durable cancer control across a variety of tumor types. Our ROCK ® platform-based immune cell engagers enable a direct interaction of NK cells, macrophages or T cells with cancer cells, leading to the destruction of the tumor cells.

Cancer

        Cancer is a broad group of diseases in which cells divide and grow in an uncontrolled fashion, forming malignancies that can invade other parts of the body. In normal tissues, the rates of new cell growth and cell death are tightly regulated and kept in balance. In cancerous tissues, this balance is disrupted as a result of gene mutations, causing unregulated cell growth that leads to tumor formation. While tumors can grow slowly or rapidly, the dividing cells will nevertheless accumulate, and the normal organization of the tissue will become disrupted. Cancers subsequently can spread throughout the body by processes known as invasion and metastasis. Cancer cells that arise in the lymphatic system and bone marrow are referred to as hematological malignancies. Cancer cells that arise in other tissues or organs are referred to as solid tumors.

        According to the American Cancer Society, cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States. In the United States, more than 1.9 million new cases of cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2021, and more than 608,000 deaths from cancer are expected to occur. The 5-year relative survival rate for all cancers diagnosed during 2009-2015 was 69%. According to a

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United States National Institute of Health National Cancer Institute estimate, national expenditures for cancer care in the United States in 2017 were approximately $147 billion.

        The most common methods of treating patients with cancer are surgery, radiation and drug therapy. For patients with localized disease, surgery and radiation therapy are particularly effective. Drug therapies are generally used by physicians in patients who have cancer that has spread beyond the primary site or cannot otherwise be treated through surgery, such as most hematological malignancies. The goal of drug therapies is to damage and kill cancer cells or to interfere with the molecular and cellular processes that control the proliferation, growth and survival of cancer cells. In many cases, drug therapy entails the administration of several different drugs in combination. Over the past several decades, drug therapy has evolved from non-specific drugs that kill both healthy and cancerous cells, to drugs that target specific molecular pathways involved in cancer.

        An early approach to pharmacological cancer treatment was to develop drugs, referred to as chemotherapies or cytotoxic drugs, which kill rapidly proliferating cancer cells through mechanisms, such as stopping cell division, disrupting cell metabolism or causing damage to cellular components required for tumor survival and rapid growth. While these drugs have been effective in the treatment of some cancers, cytotoxic drug therapies act in an indiscriminate manner, killing healthy cells along with cancerous cells. Due to their mechanism of action, many cytotoxic drugs have a narrow therapeutic window, i.e., dose range above which the toxicity causes unacceptable or even fatal levels of damage and below which the drugs are not effective in eradicating cancer cells.

        The next approach to pharmacological cancer treatment was to develop drugs, referred to as targeted therapeutics, including monoclonal antibodies, which are antibodies that derive from a single parent cell, that target specific biological molecules in the human body that play a role in cell growth and the spread of cancer. Included in this category are small molecule drugs as well as large molecule drugs, also known as biologics. With heightened vigilance and new diagnostic tests, targeted therapies (including monoclonal antibodies such as Herceptin®, Rituxan®, Erbitux® and Avastin® as well as small molecules such as Nexavar® and Tarceva®), have resulted in improvements in overall survival for many cancer patients. More recently, antibodies have been developed that are optimized regarding their effector function, also known as Fc optimized antibody drugs, for example obinutuzumab. These molecules are designed to engage NK cells and macrophages more effectively in the elimination of cancer cells.

        Cancer immunotherapy plays an increasingly important role among emerging cancer drug therapies. The science behind immunotherapies is to harness the body's own immune system to fight tumor cells. There are different approaches: vaccinations, checkpoint modulators, T cell and innate cell engagers. For example, bispecific antibodies, or cellular therapies transform a patient's own T cells to express a specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Ipilimumab (Yervoy®), sipuleucel-T (Provenge®), and more recently nivolumab (Opdivo®), pembrolizumab (Keytruda®), and blinatumomab (Blincyto®) were amongst the first cancer immunotherapies to enter the market. Our platforms of bi- antibodies add further promise to the field of immuno-oncology.

Our Technologies

        We have developed our proprietary fit-for-purpose ROCK® antibody platform to enable the generation of first-in-class multivalent, multi-specific immune cell engagers. Our antibodies have been shown to retarget innate and adaptive immune cells. ROCK® enables us to tailor tetravalent, bispecific immune cell engagers with high affinity and avidity, as well as variable pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles for different indications and settings. Leveraging this platform, we are able to generate molecules against validated oncology targets to address the limitations of existing standard treatments.

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Schematic Representation of our Fit-For-Purpose ROCK Platform

GRAPHIC

        Our ROCK® platform offers modularity and versatility for customizable antibody generation, is differentiated from other technologies and is designed to deliver immune cell engagers that:

    target different tumor-associated antigens;

    enable tumor cell killing even with low target expression;

    demonstrate high affinity binding and avidity based on bivalency;

    recruit innate immune cells through anti-CD16A-specific epitopes;

    offer different PK profiles;

    possess long cell retention time; and

    show evidence of specific innate immune cell activation and their tumor infiltration (CD16A engagers).

        Leveraging our fit-for-purpose ROCK® platform, we develop proprietary, next-generation bispecific antibodies, so-called innate cell engagers (ICE®). These ICE® molecules are designed to direct and establish a bridge between innate immune cells and cancer cells. Our innate cell engagers have the ability to create an immunological synapse between innate immune cells and cancer cells and trigger an activation cascade that leads to the destruction of cancer cells. Due to their novel tetravalent architecture (which provides for four binding domains), our innate cell engagers bind to their targets with high affinity and have half-lives that support intravenous administration and dosing schedules similar to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to achieve potent antitumor efficacy. In addition to our lead candidates, AFM13, AFM24 and AFM28, we are developing a variety of tetravalent, bispecific antibody formats with the potential to tailor immune-engaging therapies to different indications and settings.

Innate Cell Engagers

        Our fit-for-purpose ROCK® platform enables the design and development of various antibody formats.

        Specifically, our innate cell engagers are designed to have the following properties:

    bispecific or trispecific targeting;

    binding with high specificity, or selectivity;

    binding with high affinity/avidity, or strength;

    molecular weight allowing for intravenous bolus administration; and

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    stable structure conducive to efficient and cost-effective manufacturing.

        Innate cell engagers bind to innate immune cells and enable both the recognition of tumor cells and their redirection to these tumor cells by forming an immunological synapse. These cells then release perforins, creating pores in the tumor cell membrane through which granzymes enter the cell, triggering apoptosis and resulting in tumor cell death.


Schematic representation of the mode of action of a tetravalent bispecific innate cell engager

GRAPHIC

        Innate immune cells, such as NK cells and macrophages, distinguish between healthy cells and foreign or aberrant cells through a process that is governed by a complex interaction of activating and inhibitory receptors that regulate their activity. While innate immune cells can bind to the Fc regions of native full-length antibodies through Fcg receptors to induce a cytotoxic effect, our ICE ® molecules are designed to enhance the activity of innate immune cells in killing targeted tumor cells because they bind the FcgRIIIA (CD16A) receptor on innate immune cells with high specificity and approximately 1,000-fold higher affinity than IgG-based antibodies, and greater than 25-fold higher affinity than typical Fc-optimized IgG antibodies.

        CD16A is an integral membrane glycoprotein found on the surface of innate immune cells, namely NK cells and marcophages, but not neutrophils. Classical mAbs bind not only to CD16A, but, to our knowledge, also to the highly homologous CD16B, an isoform differing from CD16A by only a few amino acids. CD16B is expressed on neutrophils, which are the most numerous white blood cells (leukocytes), and blood plasma contains high levels of soluble CD16B cleaved from the daily turnover of apoptotic neutrophils. Thus CD16B, being readily available to bind to any Fc-based antibody formats, facilitates target-mediated drug disposition for such antibodies. To engage and activate innate immune cells, we have generated a highly effective and specific human antibody that specifically targets the CD16A receptor and does not cross-react with CD16B. This antibody also binds to both CD16A allotypes (amino acid 158 with either valine or phenylalanine) with equal affinity, a polymorphism that has been shown to reduce efficacy of marketed classical antibodies such as trastuzumab or elotuzumab (see figure below).

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Binding of Innate Cell Engager to CD16A (high-and low affinity genetic variants (allotypes) 158V and 158F, respectively) and to CD16B (SH, NA1 and NA2 allotypes), the latter showing no response (i.e. no binding)

GRAPHIC

        Our lead innate cell engager AFM13, binds to CD16A on innate immune cells and to CD30, a receptor found on malignant cells that have been implicated in lymphoma, including Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) and T cell lymphoma.

CD30-positive Malignancies

        CD30 is a cell membrane protein and tumor marker of different hematological malignancies, including PTCL, CTCL, HL and DLBCL.

        Hodgkin Lymphoma is a type of lymphoma, a cancer originating from white blood cells called lymphocytes. There are approximately 9,000 new cases of HL in the United States every year and about 23,000 new cases in North America, the European Union and Japan. Depending on disease stage, patients with newly diagnosed HL are treated primarily with chemotherapy and sometimes in combination with radiotherapy. The current initial standard regimens are highly effective, but associated with acute and chronic toxicity. A number of patients are either refractory to or relapsing from standard therapy that included chemotherapy followed by Adcetris®, and we believe these represent a total of approximately 4,000-5,000 patients every year in North America, the European Union and Japan.

        Adcetris® is the first approved targeted therapy for HL patients that are relapsed/refractory to second line treatments. Adcetris® targets CD30, the same target as AFM13, but has a different mode of action, acting as a targeted chemotherapy, rather than as a targeted immunotherapy. As an antibody-drug conjugate, Adcetris® delivers a toxin (monomethyl auristatin E) to the cells that carry the CD30 antigen. The drug conjugate is internalized by the tumor cell, which is then destroyed. In a phase 2 clinical study, Adcetris® treatment in relapsed/ refractory HL patients resulted in an overall response rate of 75% and a complete response rate of 34%. However, the median progression free survival after Adcetris® is 9.3 months. In addition, the treatment is associated with considerable

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adverse events like neutropenia (low neutrophils) and neuropathy (damage to the peripheral nervous system).

        The FDA and EMA have approved nivolumab in classical HL patients that have relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and Adcetris® in 2016. Recently, the FDA has approved pembrolizumab for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), or who have relapsed after three or more prior lines of therapy. Overall response rates for the anti-PD-1 antibodies (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) in relapsed/refractory classical HL patients post brentuximab vedotin are 64 to 74%, with complete remission rates of 12-25%.

        Beyond HL, other CD30+ hematological malignancies include T cell lymphoma, or TCL, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma, or DLBCL.

        4% of all new cancer cases in the US are NHL (SEER Database). In 2020, approximately 77,240 new cases of NHL were diagnosed in the US (SEER estimate). 5-10% of all Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL) are peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas (PTCL) and the majority are B-Cell Lymphomas, with approximately a third of NHL being DLBCL. There are between 4000-8000 newly diagnosed cases of PTCL in the US every year, of which 50-60% are positive for CD30. There are approximately 26,000 newly diagnosed DLBCL patients in the US every year, of which approximately a third are CD30+. Together, TCL and DLBCL contribute approximately 6,000-8,000 relapsed/refractory CD30+ cancer cases per year in North America, the European Union and Japan.

EGFR-positive Malignancies

        Current treatment options for solid tumors consist of a mix of surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies. While chemotherapy or radiotherapy were historically standard treatment strategies, specific tumor characteristics currently guide decision-making for an optimal treatment regimen for individual patients. This has led to the implementation of innovative treatments as standard of care in many solid tumors, including monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

        EGFR, an important target that is exploited by these targeted therapies, is expressed in a wide range of solid tumors and is considered a validated target for their treatment. Erbitux® and Vectibix® are anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies that are approved for the treatment of RAS-wild type metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), which represents a subset of ~45-50% of all CRC patients. However, Erbitux® and Vectibix® are not effective in KRAS mutated CRC. The activating KRAS mutations put RAS in a constitutively activated status that bypasses the signal transduction inhibition produced by EGFR targeting antibodies. In addition, Erbitux® is also approved for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancer (HNSCC). The anti-EGFR mAb Necitumumab is approved for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

        Beyond these approved indications, there are signals of clinical activity of anti-EGFR mAbs from early clinical studies in a wide range of different indications.

        Immunotherapies play an increasing role in solid tumors. PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of many different types of cancer, including melanoma, lung cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer and head and neck cancer. Many studies with cancer immunotherapies are ongoing. It is expected that immunotherapies will play an increasing role in the standard treatment of solid tumors. However, even with these advances, cure is still the exception for the majority of late stage tumors, in particular metastatic tumors, and the medical need for new and safe treatment approaches remains generally high for solid tumors.

        There is a broad spectrum of development opportunities for our tetravalent bispecific EGFR-targeting antibody, AFM24.

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    RAS -mutant colorectal cancer: The main mode-of-action of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) Erbitux® and Vectibix® is the inhibition of the downstream signalling cascade of the EGFR. However, certain mutations within the RAS-oncogene result in a lack of activity of both Erbitux® and Vectibix®. In contrast, AFM24 introduces a novel mechanism of action, inducing direct innate immune cell mediated killing of EGFR-expressing cells. AFM24 might therefore be able to overcome these limitations and be clinically active regardless of RAS mutation status.

    Combination with checkpoint inhibitors: It has been demonstrated that the PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint pathway plays an important role in different solid tumor types. This supports the rationale for investigating the combination of AFM24 with a checkpoint inhibitor in several EGFR-positive tumors in which the checkpoint inhibitors are approved, e.g., NSCLC and HNSCC.

    Combination with NK cells: We believe combining AFM24 with adoptive NK cell transfer can improve patient outcomes by ensuring patients have functional innate immune cells to be directed to the tumor and induce cytotoxic killing. In addition, through high affinity binding to CD16A, we believe AFM24 can ensure delivery of potent innate immune cells even to tumors with very low tumor antigen expression.

    Improved benefit/risk profile versus the established EGFR-targeting mAbs: By its mode-of-action our antibody might be more efficacious than the available EGFR-targeting mAbs in their approved indications (mCRC RAS WT, HNSCC, squamous NSCLC) and might exhibit an improved safety profile, especially with respect to skin toxicity, which is the most common side effect of Vectibix® and Erbitux®. Eventually an improved benefit/risk profile could result in a replacement of the existing therapies.

    Development on EGFR-positive solid tumors in which no other EGFR mAbs are approved: Clinical signals of anti-tumor activity by currently approved therapies have been observed in a broad range of indications aside from the approved ones, including triple negative breast cancer and esophageal cancer. These indications might be further pursued with AFM24.

Our Product Candidates

        Our development pipeline currently comprises three distinct product candidates for which we retain full commercial rights—AFM13, AFM24 and AFM28. Initially, we intend to pursue indications in which the medical need is high and for which there is a significant population of patients needing treatment in the salvage setting. This unmet medical need could mean that our therapeutics could be approved on an expedited basis. If and when we obtain approval for our product candidates as salvage therapies, we plan to explore whether they could also be used as first- or second-line treatments, most likely in combination with one or more treatments that comprise the existing standard of care. All of our product candidates have the potential to target several indications, which could represent significant additional commercial opportunities in the future.

AFM13

Overview

        AFM13 is a first-in-class innate cell engager that is engineered to bind with high affinity to both CD30-expressing tumor cells and to CD16A surface proteins to activate NK cells and macrophages. AFM13 is intravenously administered and has several advantageous characteristics:

    By targeting CD16A, AFM13 binds to NK cells and macrophages but not to neutrophils and is therefore more selective than full-length antibodies that bind to both CD16A and CD16B.

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    Preclinical experiments have demonstrated that the cytotoxic potency of AFM13 is consistently higher than native and Fc-enhanced anti-CD30 full-length antibodies.

    AFM13 has the potential to be effective for all known and relevant genetic variants of CD16A.

        The clinical and preclinical data that we have generated to date suggest that AFM13 appears to be well-differentiated from Adcetris®, an approved targeted therapy for HL and TCL patients. Although AFM13 employs the same disease target as Adcetris®, namely CD30, the two compounds are fundamentally different in their mechanism of action. Adcetris® is a targeted chemotherapy, while AFM13 is a targeted immunotherapy. Adcetris® delivers a toxin (monomethyl auristatin E) to the cells that carry the CD30 receptor, and the cell is killed by the action of the toxin after its internalization and release from the antibody. In contrast, AFM13 does not need to enter the cell, but serves as a connector on the cell surface between the CD30 receptor and a CD16A-positive immune cell. Once the cells are in contact, the killing activity of the immune cell is triggered.

        Tumor cells have the ability to activate a multi-drug resistance system, or MDR, which we believe may contribute to the development of resistance to Adcetris®. The MDR, however, does not affect the efficacy of an immunotherapy like AFM13. We believe that this difference may not only translate into efficacy of AFM13 in patients relapsing from Adcetris® therapy, but ultimately into a longer clinical benefit. In addition, the off-target toxicity of Adcetris®' toxin monomethyl auristatin E causes severe neutropenia (low neutrophils) and neuropathy (damage to the peripheral nervous system). We believe AFM13 may avoid these side effects because it does not introduce a toxin such as monomethyl auristatin E into the cells. Hence, AFM13 may address Adcetris®' safety limitation.

        AFM13 has been granted orphan drug status for the treatment of HL in the United States and the European Union, and for T-cell lymphoma in the United States.

Clinical development of AFM13 as monotherapy in T-cell Lymphoma

        In November 2019, the first patient was dosed in a phase 2 registration-directed study of AFM13 as monotherapy in relapsed or refractory patients with CD30-positive peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) or transformed mycosis fungoides (REDIRECT). The results of the study, if positive, could form the basis for a Biologics License Application (BLA) submission and support an accelerated approval given the unmet medical need for safe and effective new treatments in this hard-to-treat patient population. The study is designed to enroll patients with CD30-expressing PTCL or Transformed Mycosis Fungoides (TMF) and who have relapsed after an earlier standard of care treatment or have refractory disease.

        Dependent on their disease type and the magnitude of CD30 expression on their tumor cells, study participants were assigned to one of three study cohorts, each cohort receiving the same treatment of weekly AFM13 infusions (a 200 mg dose per infusion). The three cohorts are comprised of Cohort A, which includes PTCL patients with ³10% CD30 expression on tumor cells; Cohort B, which includes PTCL patients with >1% to< 10% CD30 expression on tumor cells; and, Cohort C, which includes TMF patients with ³1% CD30 expression on tumor cells. Enrollment in Cohort C is currently paused due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

        In March 2021, a pre-planned interim futility analysis was completed. The interim analysis was triggered following enrollment of 20 patients in each of the two main cohorts of the study, Cohort A and Cohort B. The futility boundary was derived from response rates for previous therapies that have received accelerated approval in relapsed or refractory PTCL. The futility analysis demonstrated that the response rate in Cohort A achieved the predefined threshold for continuation of the study. The response rate in Cohort B was sufficiently comparable to allow merging of both cohorts into a single cohort for all patients with CD30 >1%, per the study protocol. Evidence of anti-tumor response was observed in both cohorts with complete and partial responses. The safety analysis was consistent

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with previously reported data from our phase 1 trials of AFM13, with infusion related reactions (IRRs) representing the main side effect. Following the introduction of mandatory premedication, IRRs were markedly reduced, resulting in fewer dose reductions and a trend towards better activity.

        We intend to continue the study by recruiting approximately 100 - 110 response evaluable patients across Australia, South Korea, the European Union and the United States.

        We have also supported a phase 1b/2a IST of AFM13 in patients with relapsed or refractory CD30-positive lymphoma with cutaneous presentation led by investigators at Columbia University in New York. In addition to determining clinical efficacy, this study was also translational in nature, designed to allow for serial biopsies that enable assessment of NK cell biology and tumor cell killing within the tumor microenvironment. Final clinical efficacy and safety analysis of this study was recently presented at the annual ASH conference in December 2020. In 15 patients (dosed at 1.5-7.0 mg/kg) AFM13 was well-tolerated and showed therapeutic activity as a single agent, with an ORR of 42% (6 of 14 patients, 1 patient not assessed). In detail, one complete response (CR), five partial responses (PRs) and five stable diseases (SDs) were observed. An analysis of biomarker correlatives showed a decrease in circulating NK cells (CD56+ CD3- , CD56+ CD16+, NKp46+) during therapy, with post-therapy recovery. In addition, increased CD69 expression on circulating NK cells from responders vs. non-responders was demonstrated. Tumor biopsies showed increased infiltration of CD56+ NK cells pre-therapy in responders compared to non-responders, while circulating CD4+ CD25+ T cells (Tregs) decreased in responders compared to non-responders.

Clinical development of AFM13 in combination with adoptive NK cells

        In December 2016, we entered into a clinical development and commercialization collaboration with The MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) to evaluate AFM13 in combination with MDACC's cord-blood derived NK cell product. MDACC conducted preclinical research aimed at investigating its NK cells derived from umbilical cord blood in combination with AFM13. In December 2018, we presented data at the ASH Annual Meeting, outlining the successful approach of a novel premixed product comprising expanded cord-blood derived NK cells loaded with AFM13 to redirect their specificity against CD30-positive malignancies.

        In September 2020, MDACC dosed the first patient in a phase 1 study. The study is designed to administer a stable complex of AFM13 pre-complexed with cord blood-derived allogeneic NK cells in different doses (numbers of pre-complexed NK cells) to patients with relapsed/refractory CD30-positive lymphoid malignancies followed by three doses of AFM13 as monotherapy. We fund research and development expenses for this collaboration and have licensed exclusive worldwide rights to further develop and commercialize any product developed under the collaboration. The best overall responses for the first four patients enolled in the study as of March 31, 2021, including three patients dosed with two cycles of therapy in dose cohort 1 (1×106 AFM13-cbNK/kg) and one patient dosed with a single cycle of therapy in dose cohort 2 (1×107 AFM13-cbNK/kg) were announced in April 2021. All four patients experienced significant disease reduction, with two complete responses and two partial responses as assessed by the investigator, with an objective response rate of 100%. There were no observed events of cytokine release syndrome, neurotoxicity syndrome or graft-versus-host disease in these patients.

        We published data with the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) presenting evidence of AFM13 modulating NK cells by sensitizing them to IL-2 and/or IL-15 stimulation. In this study, after exposure to AFM13, the NK cells showed improved IL-2- and IL-15-mediated proliferation and cytotoxicity. This data supports the rationale for further investigation of combining our NK cell engagers with IL-2-or IL-15 to potentially achieve deeper clinical responses.

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Clinical development of AFM13 in combination with checkpoint inhibitors

        In 2019, we completed a phase 1b clinical study investigating the combination of AFM13 with Merck's anti-PD-1 antibody Keytruda® (pembrolizumab) in HL patients who had relapsed after or were refractory to chemotherapy and Adcetris®. The study was designed to establish a dosing regimen for the combination therapy and to assess its safety and efficacy. In this study, the combination was well-tolerated with most of the adverse events observed to be manageable with standard care and mild to moderate in nature. Best response assessment data from 24 patients treated at the highest AFM13 dose level (7 mg/kg) as reported by central read, showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 88% (21 of 24 patients), including complete metabolic responses (CmR) in 46% (11 of 24 patients) and partial metabolic responses (PmRs) in 42% (10 of 24 patients)

Other AFM13 clinical studies

        A phase 2a clinical study of AFM13 in patients with HL started recruitment in the second quarter of 2015. The study enrolled 25 HL patients relapsed or refractory to treatment with both Adcetris® (brentuximab vedotin) and anti-PD1 antibodies. Different dosing protocols of AFM13 were explored to allow for improved exposure in more heavily pre-treated patient populations. Final data was presented at the annual conference of the American Society of Hematology in December 2020. The overall response rate was 16.6% (95% CI, 4.5-36.1%). Twelve-month PFS and OS estimates were 12.6% (95% CI, 3.2 - 28.9%) and 62.0% (95%, CI 39.6 - 78.1) respectively. Treatment with AFM13 was deemed to be well tolerated.

AFM13-101 phase 1 dose escalation clinical study

        From September 2010 to April 2013, conducted a phase 1 clinical study of AFM13, AFM13-101, in patients with HL. All patients in this study suffered from heavily pre-treated relapsed/refractory disease and had documented progression of disease at study entry. The objectives of the study were to: determine the safety and tolerability of increasing doses of single cycles of AFM13 as a monotherapy; determine the maximum tolerated dose and optimal biological dose of AFM13; determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of AFM13; analyze immunological markers, NK cell activity, NK cell markers, serum outcome markers and cytokine release; assess the immunogenicity, or ability to provoke an immune response, of AFM13; and assess the activity of AFM13. The phase 1 study was conducted in Germany and the United States. We submitted a CTA for the phase 1 study to the PEI in May 2010 and an IND application to the FDA in June 2010.

        The study enrolled 28 patients (16 males, 12 females) in eight dose cohorts. In the dose escalation part, 24 patients received increasing doses of AFM13 ranging from 0.01 mg/kg to 7.0 mg/kg on a weekly dosing schedule for four weeks. In addition, four patients were treated with 4.5 mg/kg twice weekly for four weeks. Of the 28 patients, 14 had refractory disease and the remainder had relapsed disease. The patients had received a median of six (range three to 11) previous lines of therapy for HL. Nine patients had previously received Adcetris®.

        The clinical results were first presented to the medical community by Professor Andreas Engert, University Hospital of Cologne, the lead investigator for the study, at the Lugano International Meeting on Malignant Lymphoma in 2013. AFM13 showed an acceptable safety profile. An independent data monitoring committee, or IDMC, was responsible for the review of safety data on an ongoing basis. It was concluded that the maximum feasible single dose of 7 mg/kg was reached without any toxicity concerns, and consequently the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The four patients who were treated with 4.5 mg/kg twice weekly completed treatment without raising any toxicity concerns for the IDMC. The most common adverse events were fever and chills, and in general, they were of mild to moderate severity. Overall, less than 30% of all adverse events were severe.

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        Of the 28 patients, 26 were eligible for efficacy evaluation. For the remaining two patients, efficacy assessments have not been performed. Of the 26 patients, three had a partial remission, 13 had stable disease and 10 had disease progression as best overall response. With the exception of the 0.04 mg/kg dose cohort, anti-tumor activity was observed at all dose levels tested but was more pronounced at or above 1.5 mg/kg. In this subgroup (n=13), 3 partial responses (=50% tumor shrinkage) and 7 cases with stable disease were observed, with an overall response rate of 23% (3/13) and a disease control rate of 77%. The chart below shows for these 13 individual patients the best overall response measured as a percentage change in tumor volume from baseline (baseline = 0 at the y-axis). The volume is calculated as sum of perpendicular diameters (SPD) for selected lesions of the tumors based on CT-scans.


AFM13-101 Best Overall Response in % Change in Tumor Volume from Baseline in 13 Patients who Received 1.5 mg/kg

GRAPHIC

        Six of seven patients refractory to Adcetris® as their most recent treatment experienced stabilization of disease, or SD, following AFM13 treatment. One experienced progressive disease, or PD.

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AFM13-101 Data for Patients Refractory to Adcetris® as Immediate Prior Therapy

PATIENT
  AFM13 DOSE
(mg/kg)
  # PRIOR
TREATMENTS
  MOST RECENT
TREATMENT
  TIME LAST
ADCETRIS®—
FIRST AFM13
  AFM BEST
RESPONSE

001-01

  0.01 weekly   6   Adcetris®, 5
cycles
  1 month   SD

001-02

  0.01 weekly   7   Adcetris®, 8
cycles
  1 month   SD

001-07

  0.15 weekly   11   Adcetris®, 7
cycles
  3 months   SD

001-11

  0.5 weekly   7   Adcetris®, 5
cycles
  3 months   SD

001-12

  0.5 weekly   7   Adcetris®, 9
cycles
  1 month   SD

003-01

  0.5 weekly   9   Adcetris®, 4
cycles
  1.5 months   SD

001-21

  4.5 twice   8   Adcetris®, 8
cycles
  2.5 months   PD

        Certain biomarkers indicated dose-dependent effects suggesting most active doses at or above 1.5 mg/kg. PK data were assessed in patients of all dosing cohorts. A dose proportional increase of systemic exposure (AUC0-(or Area Under the Curve from zero to infinity in a plot of the concentration of the drug in blood plasma against time, which represents the total drug exposure over time) and Cmax (or the maximum (or peak) concentration of the drug measured in plasma after the drug has been administered)) was observed. AFM13 was detectable in peripheral blood up to 168 hours post infusion in the highest dosing cohort. The mean half-life (t1/2) for dose cohorts 1.5 mg/kg and above was 9-19 hours. AFM13 treatment resulted in an increase of activated NK cells, which are characterized by CD69 expression on their surface. There was a trend showing that higher doses result in a more pronounced increase of CD69+ NK cells. Moreover, CD69 levels rose after AFM13 administration and fell to about baseline prior to the next dose (see figure below), indicating a pattern that reflected the PK of AFM13. All 28 patients in the study had measurable levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30), at the start of AFM13 treatment. sCD30 is shed by the tumor and is/was measurable in peripheral blood. In 24 patients the level was decreased at the end of treatment. Patients treated in dose cohorts 1.5 mg/kg and higher all had a marked decrease of sCD30.

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AFM13-101: Relative number of activated (CD69+) NK cells in patients receiving 7 mg/kg AFM13 (mean, n=3)

GRAPHIC

        Based on the phase 1 data we concluded, together with experts and authorities, that AFM13 has a favorable safety profile. In addition, AFM13 showed activity in terms of tumor response and pharmacodynamics (PD), even in Adcetris® refractory patients. However, PK and PD indicate that the dose regimen has to be optimized and that the measured clinical effect is likely to underestimate the potency of AFM13 in HL. Consequently, it was determined that in the phase 2a proof of concept study, the AFM13 dose had to be 1.5 mg/kg, be administered more frequently, at least for a certain time; the treatment duration had to be longer than four weeks; and a second cycle had to be mandated in patients that showed benefit from AFM13 treatment in the first cycle, i.e., complete response, partial response or SD.

AFM24

Overview

        We are developing AFM24, a tetravalent, bispecific EGFR and CD16A-binding innate cell engager, for patients with advanced cancers known to express EGFR. AFM24 is engineered to broadly treat EGFR-expressing solid tumors through innate immune cell activation, potentially avoiding safety and mutational status limitations, as well as resistance mechanisms associated with other therapies. AFM24 is unique in that it activates innate immunity to kill solid tumors by inducing both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), as compared to other therapies that rely heavily on signal or checkpoint inhibition. We have successfully completed a toxicology study in cynomolgus monkeys at a range of dose levels up to 75mg/kg over 4 weeks with no observed toxicities even at high dose levels. In contrast, Cetuximab, an approved anti-EGFR antibody, revealed significant toxicity at the same dose-range.

Clinical development of AFM24 as monotherapy

        In November 2019, our IND application for AFM24 cleared the required 30-day review by the FDA and is in effect for a phase 1/2a clinical trial of AFM24 in patients with advanced cancers

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known to express EGFR. We also received regulatory approval to commence a clinical trial of AFM24 from the UK and Spain. The initial goal of the study is to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase 2 dose of AFM24, as well as to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and preliminary efficacy in patients with advanced cancers known to express EGFR. The dose expansion phase of the study is intended to collect preliminary evidence of efficacy and to further confirm the safety of AFM24 as a monotherapy in patients with select solid tumor subtypes. The study started enrolling patients in the second quarter of 2020 and has successfully completed 4 cohorts of increasing doses of AFM24 and is actively recruiting patients to cohort 5.

Clinical development of AFM24 in combination with adoptive NK cells

        In March 2021, the FDA cleared an IND application we co-sponsored with NKGen Biotech (formerly known as NKMax America) to initiate a first-in-human phase 1/2a study of AFM24 in combination with SNK01 NK cells in patients with advanced cancers known to express EGFR. The goal of this study is to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase 2 dose, of AFM24 in combination with SNK01 NK cells. We currently expect to initiate the study in the second half of 2021.

        The study will be conducted pursuant to a clinical collaboration agreement we signed with NKGen Biotech in October 2020. Under the agreement, the two companies will contribute their respective product candidates and resources for the clinical trial. The clinical trial will combine NKGen Biotech's SNK01 (enhanced natural killer cells) with AFM24 in the autologous setting with the option to expand the clinical trial to the allogeneic setting. The cost of the clinical study will be shared by Affimed and NKGen Biotech. The agreement also provides for the opportunity to pursue further clinical study combinations with additional product candidates from both parties.

        In addition, in November 2020, we entered an R&D collaboration with Artiva Biotherapeutics to assess the feasibility and preclinical activity of combinations of Artiva's allogeneic NK cell product AB-101 and Affimed's ICE® molecules, building on earlier preclinical studies demonstrating synergistic cytotoxic activity.

        Under the agreement, AFM24 and other undisclosed targets will be combined with Artiva's GMP-grade allogeneic NK cells during the cell manufacturing process. The pre-manufacturing process will include the loading of AB-101 with Affimed ICE® molecules prior to cryopreservation, creating specifically targeted allogeneic cells without the requirement for viral transduction. The resulting cryopreserved, off-the-shelf, targeted allogeneic NK cell products will be assessed for anti-tumor activity and development potential. The costs of manufacturing and preclinical assessments will be shared by both companies. The agreement provides for potential further development of selected combination products.

Clinical development of AFM24 in combination with checkpoint inhibitors

        In February 2021, we entered into a clinical research collaboration with Roche to explore the combination of AFM24 with Roche's PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor atezolizumab (Tecentriq®). Pursuant to the collaboration, we will fund and conduct a phase 1/2a clinical trial to investigate the combination of AFM24 and atezolizumab for the treatment of advanced EGFR expressing malignancies in patients whose disease has progressed after treatment with previous anticancer therapies. Roche will supply us with atezolizumab for the clinical trial. The phase 1/2a study will establish a dosing regimen for the combination therapy and assess safety and potential activity of AFM24 in combination with SNK01 NK cells. We currently expect to initiate the study in the second half of 2021.

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AFM26 (Genentech: RO7297089)

        We have also developed AFM26, an innate cell-engaging bispecific antibody targeting B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) to address the medical need for a novel approach to treat multiple myeloma. In August 2018, Affimed announced a collaboration with Genentech, a Roche Group company, to investigate AFM26, renamed RO7297089, in BCMA. Data presented at AACR 2020 on RO7297089 provided preclinical characterization of a novel BCMA/CD16A ICE® and showed that RO7297089 is a potent therapeutic agent in vitro and selectively kills BCMA expressing multiple myeloma tumor cells by activating innate immunity (ADCC and ADCP). The in vitro assessment demonstrated that, unlike T cell redirecting therapies, RO7297089 is unlikely to have a risk of acute cytokine release. In a one-month repeat-dose study in cynomolgus monkeys, RO7297089 was well tolerated, and there were no test article-related adverse effects at up to 50 mg/kg, with no significant cytokine release. We believe RO7297089 represents a novel and promising mechanism of action with a favorable safety profile, distinct from the T cell-based BCMA-targeting modalities in the clinic.

AFM28

        AFM28 is currently in preclinical development, and we expect to file an IND application with the FDA in the first half of 2022.

Antibody generation at AbCheck

        AbCheck is our wholly owned, independently operated proprietary antibody screening platform company. AbCheck combines four different technologies to supply high-quality antibodies to us as well as others on a fee-for-service basis. AbCheck offers phage display antibody libraries, yeast display, affinity maturation algorithm technologies and Rabbit Mass Humanization. AbCheck is recognized for its expertise in antibody discovery throughout the United States and Europe and has been working with globally active pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies such as Tusk Therapeutics, bluebird bio, Eli Lilly, Daiichi Sankyo, Pierre Fabre and others.

Collaborations

        We have entered into strategic collaborations for some of our development programs. As part of our business development strategy, we aim to increase the number of our research collaborations in order to derive further value from our platforms and additionally exploit their potential. Key terms of our current material collaborations are summarized below.

Roivant Sciences

    Overview

        On November 9, 2020, we announced that we entered into a license and strategic collaboration agreement with a subsidiary of Roivant Sciences Ltd. ("Roivant") to develop and commercialize novel ICE® molecules, including AFM32, in oncology. Under the terms of the agreement, we received $60 million in upfront consideration, comprised of $40 million in cash and pre-paid R&D funding, and $20 million of newly issued shares in Roivant. We are eligible to receive up to an additional $2 billion in milestones over time upon achievement of specified development, regulatory and commercial milestones, as well as tiered royalties on net sales.

    Research collaboration and license agreement

        Under the terms of the Roivant Agreement, a NewCo will be created and will be primarily responsible for clinical development and commercialization worldwide in respect of each product candidate while we will collaborate in the discovery and research phases of molecule development.

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Each product candidate will be developed pursuant to a research program ("Research Program") and conducted by a joint project team, which will be overseen by a joint steering committee (the "JSC"), consisting of an equal number of representatives of NewCo and our company. If the JSC is unable to reach agreement on a particular matter, NewCo will generally have final decision-making authority, provided that the JSC may not decide on matters that (i) relate exclusively to the use of our innate cell engaging ROCK® technology platform as generally applied and not specifically applied to any licensed antibody products developed under their corresponding Research Program and directed, as applicable, to the lead target or any additional NewCo targets or (ii) would increase the then current number of full-time equivalents ("FTEs") that we have assigned to the performance of the research plan for a certain Research Program by more than a certain number of additional FTEs. Except with respect to the activities being conducted by NewCo and us under the Research Programs and subject to our co-promotion option, NewCo shall have sole responsibility for, and bear all costs for, researching, developing and commercializing each product candidate, including all regulatory matters in relation thereto. The Research Programs will be funded by NewCo through an upfront payment to us.

        We are subject to certain effort requirements in connection with our research activities under the Roivant Agreement, provision of technical assistance to NewCo and agreement with NewCo upon designation of the exclusive targets. NewCo must use diligent efforts to clinically develop and commercialize at least one licensed product that binds to each exclusive target in the United States, the European Union or Japan.

        NewCo will own intellectual property that solely relates to the composition, method of use or manufacture of the any antibody product directed against the designated targets. We will own intellectual property that is an improvement of or otherwise solely relates to our innate cell engaging ROCK® technology. Other newly developed intellectual property will either be owned solely by a party if that party solely developed it or will be jointly owned by us and NewCo if developed by both parties.

        The Roivant Agreement will expire on a country-by-country basis and licensed product-by-licensed product basis when there is no remaining royalty payment or other payment obligation in such country with respect to a licensed product. Either party may terminate the Roivant Agreement in its entirety, or with respect to a particular target, for any uncured material breach of the Roivant Agreement by the other party. Either party may also terminate the Roivant Agreement upon the other party's insolvency.

        NewCo also has the right to unilaterally terminate the Roivant Agreement in its entirety, in its sole discretion, upon certain advance written notice. If the Roivant Agreement is terminated in its entirety, either by NewCo for convenience or by Affimed for Newco's uncured material breach or bankruptcy, Affimed has a right to negotiate commercially reasonable terms under which NewCo grants to Affimed a license to the licensed products with respect to any exclusive target existing as of such termination date. If Affimed does not agree with NewCo on such terms, the dispute will be settled by arbitration.

Genentech

    Overview

        On August 24, 2018 we entered into a research collaboration and license agreement with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, for the development and commercialization of certain product candidates that contain novel NK cell engager-based immunotherapeutics to treat multiple cancers. Under the terms of the agreement, in the fourth quarter of 2018, we received $96 million.

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    Research collaboration and license agreement

        Under the terms of the research collaboration and license agreement (for purposes of this subsection, the "Agreement"), we granted Genentech an exclusive, royalty-bearing, sublicensable worldwide license during the term of the Agreement and thereafter under patent rights and know-how to commercialize the licensed portfolio and any additional product candidates developed pursuant to the Agreement against the exclusive targets designated by Genentech. Genentech has granted us a non-exclusive, royalty-free, non-sublicensable, worldwide license under certain of its intellectual property solely to fulfill our research obligations under the Agreement.

        In addition to the $96 million in payments received in 2018, we are eligible to receive up to approximately $5.0 billion in total milestone payments upon successful development and commercialization of all product candidates developed pursuant to the Agreement. Of the $5.0 billion in milestone payments, approximately $250 million relate to development activities, $1.1 billion relate to receipt of regulatory approvals, and $3.6 billion relate to achievement of specified thresholds of worldwide net sales. In addition, we are eligible to receive tiered royalties from Genentech on net sales of licensed product candidates on a product-by-product and country-by-country basis until the later of the date when there are no valid patent claims under our licensed patents covering such licensed product in the applicable country and the tenth anniversary of the date of first commercial sale of such licensed product in such country. In March 2019, we were informed that an initial pre-clinical milestone was approved by Genentech. In November 7, 2019, we also announced that Genentech exercised its final option for an exclusive target under the companies' collaboration agreement to develop and commercialize novel NK cell engager-based immunotherapeutics generated by our ROCK® platform to treat multiple cancers. The target selection triggered a milestone payment, in an undisclosed amount, to us from Genentech. During 2020, Genentech initiated a phase 1 clinical study for RO7297089, which triggered an additional milestone payment in an undisclosed amount.

        Under the terms of the Agreement, Genentech will be responsible for a majority of the research, development and commercialization costs incurred in respect of each product candidate. The development of each product candidate will be overseen by a joint project team, which will in turn be overseen by a joint research committee, or JRC, consisting of an equal number of representatives of Genentech and us. If the JRC is unable to reach agreement, Genentech generally has final decision-making authority, provided that the JRC may not increase or decrease costs dedicated to our research activities under any research plan without our consent.

        We are subject to certain efforts requirements in connection with our research activities under the Agreement, provision of technical assistance to Genentech and agreement with Genentech upon designation of the exclusive targets. Genentech must use commercially reasonable efforts to develop and commercialize in one of the United States, European Union or Japan at least one licensed product that binds to each exclusive target.

        We will own intellectual property that we solely develop under the Agreement or that predominantly relates to its antibody engineering platform or molecule fragments that bind to the NK cell. Genentech will own intellectual property that it solely develops under the Agreement or that predominantly relates to an antibody designed to solely bind to an exclusive target. Other newly developed intellectual property will be jointly owned by us and Genentech. The parties will jointly prosecute related patents, provided that Genentech will make final decisions regarding prosecution of patents that claim exclusive targets or relate to developed intellectual property that it solely owns under the Agreement and we will make final decisions regarding prosecution of patents that relate to developed intellectual property that we solely own under the Agreement.

        The Agreement will expire on a country-by-country basis and licensed product-by-licensed product basis until there is no remaining royalty payment or other payment obligation in such country

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with respect to a licensed product. Either party may terminate the Agreement in its entirety, or with respect to a particular target, for any uncured material breach of the Agreement by the other party. Either party may also terminate the Agreement upon the other party's insolvency. Genentech also has the right to unilaterally terminate the Agreement in its entirety or with respect to a particular target, in its sole discretion, upon certain advance written notice. If the Agreement is terminated in its entirety or with respect to a particular exclusive target, either by Genentech for convenience or by us for material breach, we have a right to negotiate commercially reasonable terms under which Genentech grants to us (i) the right to transfer licensed products under any terminated exclusive target to us and (ii) a license for Genentech's intellectually property to such licensed products for further commercialization of such licensed products. If we do not agree with Genentech on such terms, the dispute will be finally settled by arbitration.

MD Anderson Cancer Center

        In December 2020, we entered into a patent and technology license agreement with MD Anderson Cancer Center (the "MDACC License Agreement"), for the development and commercialization of certain novel oncology therapeutics resulting from the combination of cord blood-derived natural killer cells (CBNKs) and ICE® molecules, including AFM13. Under the terms of the MDACC License Agreement, we were granted an exclusive, royalty-bearing, sublicensable worldwide license during the term of the MDACC License Agreement to develop, manufacture and commercialize combination products requiring MDACC's patent rights and know-how. Pursuant to the MDACC License Agreement, we paid MDACC an unrefundable upfront license fee, and MDACC is eligible to receive payments for development, regulatory and commercial milestones on a product by product basis. Milestone payments include, (i) for AFM13, up to $27 million in development milestones, $52.5 million in regulatory milestones and $90 million in commercial milestones, and (ii) for any other combination product, up to $14.25 million in development milestones, $26.25 million in regulatory milestones and $45 million in commercial milestones. MDACC is also eligible to receive low single-digit, tiered royalties on net sales of products developed pursuant to the MDACC License Agreement. MDACC is also eligible to receive certain payments pursuant to any sublicense of our rights under the MDACC License Agreement.

        We are subject to certain efforts requirements in connection with our research and commercialization activities under the MDACC License Agreement.

        MDACC, at its own cost, shall have control over the filing, prosecution, maintenance, and enforcement of any patents or patent applications under the Patent Rights.

        The MDACC License Agreement will expire on the later of (i) December 2060 or (ii) expiration, on a country-by-country basis, of all licensed patents and the cancellation, withdrawal, or express abandonment of all licensed patent applications. MDACC may terminate the MDACC License Agreement upon our bankruptcy or insolvency. We may also terminate the agreement unilaterally upon certain advance written notice.

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

        Overview.    In 2013, we entered into a research funding agreement with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, or LLS, for the clinical development of AFM13. Pursuant to the research funding agreement, LLS agreed to co-fund the clinical phase 2a development of AFM13 and to contribute up to approximately $4.4 million over two years to support the project. We agreed to match LLS's contributions toward the project budget. Our receipt of the $4.4 million total that LLS has agreed to contribute is conditioned on the achievement of certain milestones in connection with the development of AFM13. All milestones have been met and we have received $4.4 million in funds from LLS. We also have retained exclusive commercialization and distribution rights to AFM13. In

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June 2016, the research funding agreement was amended to reflect a shift to the development of combination therapeutic approaches so that the milestones now relate primarily to the development of AFM13 as a combination therapy.

        Intellectual property and licenses.    Each party owns inventions made and data and know-how generated exclusively by such party or its affiliates prior to and during the term of the research funding agreement relating to the AFM13 development program. If any of such data, inventions and know-how is jointly made, it is jointly owned. LLS grants us an exclusive, worldwide, fully paid-up license to its rights in any such joint inventions and any invention made by any LLS employee resulting from the AFM13 development program for purposes specified in the research funding agreement. We have granted LLS an exclusive license to AFM13 that is only effective if we have ceased, or ceased commercially reasonable efforts with respect to, research, development and commercialization of all AFM13 products for a specified period, which period may be extended. As an alternative to this license, we may elect to pay LLS a payment equal to the amount that LLS actually funded to us plus interest. LLS has agreed to make reasonable adjustments and accommodations to this license in the event it impedes our ability to seek a partner to commercialize AFM13.

        Royalties.    In consideration of LLS's payments to us, we have agreed to pay LLS a mid-single digit royalty on net sales of products containing AFM13 until we have paid LLS a low single digit multiple of the funding they provided to us. After we have reached this initial royalty cap, we will pay LLS a sub-single digit royalty on net sales until the earlier of (i) the expiration of the last to expire patent covering the AFM13 products and (ii) ten years after the initial royalty cap is satisfied. These royalty payments are calculated on a country-by-country and product-by-product basis. We have also agreed to make certain low-to-mid-single digit royalty payments to LLS in the event of certain transfers of rights to any product containing AFM13 or in the event we undergo certain change of control transactions, in each case up to the royalty cap described above.

        Term and termination.    Unless earlier terminated pursuant to the terms of the agreement, the research funding agreement terminates when there are no longer any payment obligations owing from one party to another. The research funding agreement may be terminated by either party for the other party's material breach, material violation of applicable law, or if a representation or warranty made by the other party in the research funding agreement is not true in any material respect, subject to a specified cure period. If LLS terminates for our default, our royalty obligations and the interruption license will survive such termination. Either party may terminate if the other party undergoes specified bankruptcy or insolvency-related events.

Intellectual Property

Overview

        We strive to protect the proprietary technologies that we believe are important to our business, including seeking and maintaining patent protection intended to protect, for example, the composition of matter of our product candidates, their methods of use, the technology platforms used to generate them, related technologies and/or other aspects of the inventions that are important to our business. We also rely on trade secrets and careful monitoring of our proprietary information to protect aspects of our business that are not amenable to, or that we do not consider appropriate for, patent protection.

        We plan to continue to expand our intellectual property estate by filing patent applications directed to dosage forms, methods of treatment and additional compositions created or identified from our technology platforms and ongoing development of our product candidates. Specifically, we seek patent protection in the United States and internationally for novel compositions of matter

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directed to aspects of the molecules, basic structures and processes for manufacturing these molecules and the use of these molecules in a variety of therapies.

        Our success will depend significantly on our ability to obtain and maintain patent and other proprietary protection for commercially important technology, inventions and know-how related to our business, defend and enforce our patents, maintain our licenses to use intellectual property owned by third parties, preserve the confidentiality of our trade secrets and operate without infringing the valid and enforceable patents and other proprietary rights of third parties. We also rely on know-how, continuing technological innovation and in-licensing opportunities to develop, strengthen, and maintain our proprietary positions. To date, we have not identified any potential infringement of our patents by third parties.

        A third party may hold intellectual property, including patent rights that are important or necessary to the development of our product candidates or use of our technology platforms. It may be necessary for us to use the patented or proprietary technology of third parties to commercialize our product candidates, in which case we would be required to obtain a license from these third parties on commercially reasonable terms, or our business could be harmed, possibly materially.

Our Platforms and Programs

        The patent portfolios for our most advanced programs are summarized below.

    AFM13

        We own and/or control our AFM13 (CD30 NK cell TandAb) patent portfolio, which includes three patent families. Our first patent family is issued and relates to the engineered antibody format, which is called TandAb, and the methods of making or using such bispecific, tetravalent domain antibodies. This patent family expired in 2019.

        The second patent family on AFM13 is granted for the use of the specific target combination for the treatment of cancer using a bispecific molecule. This patent family is granted in Europe (Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and Switzerland/Liechtenstein) and expired in 2020. One patent family relates to the mode of action of AFM13, the recruitment of immune effector cells via a specific receptor. We filed a related PCT application and respective national phases are pending in Brazil, and the United States. Any patents resulting from these patent applications, if issued, also will expire in 2026. Patents have been granted in Australia, Canada, China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Russia, Europe (France, Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Austria, Denmark and Sweden) and certain claims have been allowed in the United States (expiry of the US patent in 2029). In 2016 a patent application claiming a combination of AFM13 with PD-1 antibodies was filed. The respective PCT application is pending in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the United States. Patents have been granted in Europe (Austria, Belgium, Switzerland/Liechtenstein, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Finland, France, Great Britain, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Monaco, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, San Marino und Turkey), China and Japan. An unpublished PCT application claiming a method for the production of AFM13 and the related product and was filed in 2020 and respective issued patents will expire 2040.

    AFM24

        We own and/or control the patents which cover our EGFR/CD16A compound. These include one granted patent family which is comparable to AFM11 and AFM13, the patents on the TandAb format issued in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland/Liechtenstein and the United States. As

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for AFM13, another patent family relates to the recruiting of immune effector cells via a specific receptor, and will expire in 2026/United states in 2029. Patents have been granted in Australia, China, India, Russia, Europe (France, Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland and Liechtenstein, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Austria, Denmark and Sweden) and certain claims have been allowed in the United States. In 2019 a PCT patent application was filed which relates to the specific AFM24 compound. National phases of the application are pending in Europe, the United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Russia, China, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Africa and India. Any patents resulting from these patent applications, if issued, will expire in 2039.

    AFM26

        We have outlicensed the patents which cover our BCMA/CD16A compound. These include a patent family directed to BCMA/CD16A TandAb constructs pending in Australia, Canada, China, Europe, Japan and the United States. In 2019 a patent application was filed which relates to specific multivalent antibody constructs and the specific AFM26 compound. The application was nationalized in Argentina, Taiwan, the Gulf Cooperation Council, United States, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Israel, Iran, Malaysia, China, Columbia, Egypt, Europe, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, Ukraine, and Vietnam. Any patents resulting from these patent applications, if issued, will expire in 2039. In the United States a patent specific for the AFM26 compound has been granted.

    ROCK ® platform

        We own and/or control our immune cell engager platform patent portfolio. This includes a patent family that covers multivalent antibody constructs comprised of four variable domains which are fused by linkers in different length. The claims with regard to use of such immune cell engager antibodies cover general diagnostic and therapeutic use, in particular for viral, bacterial or tumoral diseases. These patents expired in 2019 and were granted in Australia, Canada, certain countries in Europe, Japan and the United States. Another pending patent application covers immune cell engagers that have a different immune cell engager structure which shows increased potency. The application is currently pending in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Europe, Japan, Mexico, Russia and the United States and if issued the patent will expire in 2030. Closely related to the immune cell engager platform is the Flexibody format, which is covered by a patent family fully owned by us, granted in Europe and Japan. A U.S. application in this family is still pending. These patents and applications (if issued) will expire in 2021. The latest patent application relating to specific Fc-comprising ROCK® antibody constructs, which also claims the specific AFM26 compound was filed in 2019. The application was nationalized in Argentina, Taiwan, the Gulf Cooperation Council, United States, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Israel, Iran, Malaysia, China, Columbia, Egypt, Europe, India, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, Ukraine, and Vietnam. Any patents resulting from these patent applications, if issued, will expire in 2039.

    Trispecific Antibodies

        Another platform development effort resulted in the successful generation of a trispecific antibody format, for which we submitted patent applications in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Europe, India, Japan, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, South Korea and the U.S. in 2015. Patents based on this application have been granted in Europe, Japan and South Africa. Another International PCT-application was filed in 2016 for further trispecific antibody formats. These patent applications were submitted to cover several, dimeric and trispecific antibody formats which are based on variable domains characterized by a common specific dimerization pattern. The application is currently pending in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Europe, Hong Kong, India, Israel, Japan,

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Mexico, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea and the United States and if issued the patent will expire in 2036.

    Novel Tetravalent Bispecific Antibody Formats

        We are exploring various tetravalent, bispecific immune cell engagement formats designed to prolong both serum PK and pharmacodynamics.

In-Licensed Intellectual Property

        We have entered into exclusive as well as non-exclusive patent and know-how license agreements which grant us the right to develop, use and commercialize our immune cell engager antibody platform and product candidates derived thereof. The licenses include obligations to pay development milestones and sales royalties on products we develop and commercialize that were generated using the patented technologies.

FDA Regulatory Review Process

        The Hatch-Waxman Act permits a patent term extension for FDA-approved drugs of up to five years beyond the expiration of the patent. The length of the patent term extension is related to the length of time the drug is under regulatory review. Patent extension cannot extend the remaining term of a patent beyond a total of 14 years from the date of product approval and only one patent applicable to an approved drug may be extended. Similar provisions are available in other jurisdictions to extend the term of a patent that covers an approved drug, or to offer similar protection for an extended period, as is the case in the European Union. In the future, if and when our pharmaceutical product candidates receive FDA approval, we expect to apply for patent term extensions on patents covering those products. We intend to seek patent term extensions to any of our issued patents in any jurisdiction where these are available, however there is no guarantee that the applicable authorities, including the FDA in the United States, will agree with our assessment of whether such extensions should be granted, and even if granted, the length of such extensions.

Trade Secrets

        We also rely on trade secret protection for our confidential and proprietary information. Included in our trade secrets are various aspects of our manufacturing process that we conduct in cooperation with contract manufacturers.

        Although we take steps to protect our proprietary information and trade secrets, including through contractual means with our employees, contractors and consultants, third parties may independently develop substantially equivalent proprietary information and techniques or otherwise gain access to our trade secrets or disclose our technology. Thus, we may not be able to meaningfully protect our trade secrets. It is our policy to require our employees, contractors, consultants, outside scientific collaborators, sponsored researchers and other advisors to execute confidentiality agreements upon the commencement of employment or consulting relationships with us. These agreements provide that all confidential information concerning our business or financial affairs developed or made known to the individual during the course of the individual's relationship with us is to be kept confidential and not disclosed to third parties except in specific circumstances. German law provides that all inventions conceived by the individual, and which are related to our current or planned business or research and development or made during normal working hours, on our premises or using our equipment or proprietary information, are our exclusive property. In many cases our confidentiality and other agreements with consultants, outside scientific collaborators, sponsored researchers and other advisors require them to assign or grant us licenses to inventions

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they invent as a result of the work or services they render under such agreements or grant us an option to negotiate a license to use such inventions.

Manufacturing

        We express our tetravalent bispecific ICE® product candidates in mammalian cells and develop our production processes on a laboratory scale. The research grade material made in our laboratories is suitable for conducting compound profiling activities. In the course of preclinical development, we transfer the process to external manufacturers (Contract Manufacturing Organizations, or CMOs) which we select according to a standardized operating procedure. Before and during the cooperation with a CMO we conduct audits to assess quality and compliance with the mutually agreed process descriptions and current Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) regulations. The CMOs themselves are controlled by their in-house quality assurance functions and inspected by regulatory agencies, including EMEA and the FDA.

        The technology transfer generally includes several different aspects: the development of a production cell line, the development of a research master and working cell banks, the development and qualification of upstream and downstream processes, the development of the drug product process and the development of suitable validated analytical methods for test and release, as well as stability testing. During the development of our drug candidates, our CMOs scale the manufacturing process to suitable size. Such upscaling typically takes several steps and may involve modification of the process, in which case comparability of the resulting material to earlier preclinical and clinical material must be demonstrated to the relevant authorities before proceeding with further clinical studies. From our CMOs we receive process development-derived material for preclinical testing and material meeting GMP standards for clinical supplies.

        We rely on and will continue to rely on CMOs for both drug substance and drug product. We seek to establish a good relationship in order to expeditiously solve problems should they arise. Our contract manufacturers have extensive capacities and a certain flexibility to adjust to demand. Likewise, our manufacturers purchase and stock materials required for production usually from multiple sources and should therefore be less vulnerable to potential shortages. Generally, we need to commit to certain manufacturing slots and capacities in advance, which typically involves the payment of reservation fees.

        We have successfully scaled up the AFM13 process and manufacturing material to meet the clinical drug supply demands for our clinical studies. We are currently working with several external companies to establish a manufacturing process with a productivity adequate for the commercial phase.

Commercialization

        We have not yet established a sales, marketing or product distribution infrastructure because our lead product candidate is still in clinical development.

        Prior to receiving marketing approvals, we plan to build a focused sales and marketing organization to sell our products if and when marketing approval is granted. We believe that such an organization will be able to address the community of oncologists who are the key specialists in treating the patient populations for which our product candidates are being developed.

        We also plan to build a marketing and sales management organization to create and implement marketing strategies for any products that we market through our own sales organization and to oversee and support our salesforce. The responsibilities of the marketing organization would include developing educational initiatives with respect to approved products and establishing relationships with thought leaders in relevant fields of medicine.

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Competition

        The biopharmaceutical industry is characterized by rapidly advancing technologies, intense competition and a strong emphasis on proprietary products. While we believe that our technology, knowledge, experience and scientific resources provide us with competitive advantages, we face potential competition from many different sources, including major pharmaceutical, specialty pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic institutions and governmental agencies and public and private research institutions. Any product candidates that we successfully develop and commercialize will compete with existing therapies and new therapies that may become available in the future.

        There are many companies developing or marketing treatments for cancer, including many major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. These treatments consist both of small molecule drug products, as well as biologic therapeutics that work, among others, either by using next-generation antibody technology platforms or by new immunological approaches to address specific cancer targets. These treatments are often combined with one another in an attempt to maximize the response rate. In addition, several companies are developing therapeutics that work by targeting multiple specificities using a single recombinant molecule, as we are.

        Clinical phase 2 data with the anti-PD-1 CPIs nivolumab and pembrolizumab in HL have been published. These data indicate that treatment with anti-PD-1 antibodies results in high response rates in the salvage setting of HL. In 2016, the FDA granted accelerated approval, and the European Commission granted approval for nivolumab in classical HL patients who have relapsed or progressed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®). In 2017, the FDA granted accelerated approval, and the European Commission granted approval for pembrolizumab in adult and pediatric patients with refractory cHL who have relapsed after 3 or more prior lines of therapy, and the European Commission granted approval for pembrolizumab in adult patients with relapsed or refractory cHL who have failed autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) and brentuximab vedotin, or who are transplant-ineligible and have failed brentuximab vedotin. In 2020, the FDA granted full approval for pembrolizumab based on the previous conditional approval. Phase 2 and phase 3 studies of brentuximab vedotin in combination with nivolumab in HL are ongoing. If AFM13 were to be approved for HL, we could be in competition with these therapies, as well as any other therapies or combination regimens that comprise the standard of care that AFM13 could potentially displace. Several other agents have reached proof of concept clinical studies in HL, including Afinitor (Novartis AG), and lenalidomide (Celgene).

        Bretuximab vedotin, or Adcetris®, an antibody-drug conjugate targeting CD30, was approved by the FDA in relapsed/refractory HL in 2011. In addition, Adcetris® was approved by the FDA in 2018 for the treatment of previously untreated Stage 3/4 cHL in combination with chemotherapy. In the European Union, Adcetris® is approved for similar indications. Adcetris® is also indicated for previously treated systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), primary cutaneous ALCL, and CD30 positive mycosis fungoides, as well as for previously untreated systemic ALCL or other CD30 positive peripheral T-cell lymphomas in combination with chemotherapy in the US and for previously untreated systemic ALCL in Europe. Adcetris® is currently being investigated in various combinations in HL, including checkpoint inhibitors.

        We expect that our ROCK® platform as well as our novel antibody formats derived from this platform will serve as the basis for future product candidates and collaborations with pharmaceutical companies. Other companies also have developed platform technologies that may compete with our platforms. For example, Dragonfly Therapeutics is developing TriNKET, which specifically activates cells of the innate and adaptive immune system and has recently started clinical development of one of these TriNKET assets. GT Biopharma is developing its TriKEs and TetraKEs platform designed to target natural killer cells and tumor cells forming an immune synapse between the NK cell and the

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tumor cell thereby inducing NK cell activation at that site, and recently started clinical development of multiple assets. Compass Therapeutics is also developing bispecific antibodies that engage the innate immune system and one of these recently entered clinical development..

        Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, manufacturing, marketing, drug development, technical and human resources than we do. Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic industries may result in even more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of our competitors. Smaller or early-stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. These competitors also compete with us in recruiting and retaining top qualified scientific and management personnel and establishing clinical study sites and patient registration for clinical studies, as well as in acquiring technologies complementary to, or necessary for, our programs.

        The key competitive factors affecting the success of all of our therapeutic product candidates, if approved, are likely to be their efficacy, safety, dosing convenience, price, the effectiveness of companion diagnostics in guiding the use of related therapeutics, our marketing capabilities, the level of generic competition and the availability of reimbursement from government and other third-party payors.

        Our commercial opportunity could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products that are safer, more effective, have fewer or less severe effects, are more convenient, have a broader label, are marketed more effectively, are reimbursed or are less expensive than any products that we may develop.

        Our competitors also may obtain FDA, European Commission or other regulatory approval for their products more rapidly than we may obtain approval for ours, which could result in our competitors establishing a strong market position before we are able to enter the market. Even if our product candidates achieve marketing approval, they may be priced at a significant premium over competitive products if any have been approved by then, resulting in reduced competitiveness.

        In addition, our ability to compete may be affected in many cases by insurers or other third-party payors seeking to encourage the use of biosimilar products. Biosimilar products are expected to become available over the coming years. The regulatory framework to approve biosimilar products has already been created in Europe and the United States.

        The most common methods of treating patients with cancer are surgery, radiation and drug therapy. There are a variety of available drug therapies marketed for cancer. In many cases, these drugs are administered in combination to enhance efficacy. While our product candidates may compete with many existing drug and other therapies, to the extent they are ultimately used in combination with or as an adjunct to these therapies, our product candidates will not be competitive with them as such. Some of the currently approved drug therapies are branded and subject to patent protection, and others are available on a generic basis. Many of these approved drugs are well established therapies and are widely accepted by physicians, patients and third-party payors.

        In addition to currently marketed therapies, there are also a number of products in late stage clinical development to treat cancer. These product candidates in development may provide efficacy, safety, dosing convenience and other benefits that are not provided by currently marketed therapies or our drugs. As a result, they may provide significant competition for any of our product candidates for which we obtain marketing approval.

        If our lead product candidates are approved for the indications for which we are currently undertaking clinical studies, they will compete with the therapies and currently marketed drugs discussed elsewhere in this document.

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Government Regulation and Product Approval

        Government authorities in all major pharmaceutical markets extensively regulate, among other things, the research, non-clinical and clinical development, testing, manufacture, packaging, storage, recordkeeping, labeling, advertising, promotion, distribution, marketing and import and export of pharmaceutical products such as those we are developing. Although our initial focus will be on the United States and Europe, we will develop and seek marketing approval for our products also in other countries and territories, such as Canada or Japan, and for markets that follow the leading authorities, such as Brazil or South Korea. The processes for obtaining regulatory approvals in the United States, Europe and in other countries, along with subsequent compliance with applicable statutes and regulations, require the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources.

International Conference on Harmonization (ICH)

        The International Council for Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use, or the ICH, is a project that brings together the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan and the United States and experts from the pharmaceutical industry in the three regions to discuss scientific and technical aspects of pharmaceutical product registration. The purpose of ICH is to reduce or obviate the need to duplicate the testing carried out during the research and development of new medicines by recommending ways to achieve greater harmonization in the interpretation and application of technical guidelines and requirements for product registration. Harmonization would lead to a more economical use of human, animal and material resources, the elimination of unnecessary delay in the global development and availability of new medicines while maintaining safeguards on quality, safety, and efficacy, and regulatory obligations to protect public health.

        ICH guidelines have been adopted as law in several countries. In many areas of drug development ICH has resulted in comparable requirements, for instance with respect to the Common Technical Document, or the CTD, which has become the standard dossier format for filings for market authorization in several jurisdictions. Thus, ICH has facilitated a more efficient path to markets.

FDA Approval Process

        All of our current product candidates are subject to regulation in the United States by the FDA as biological products, or biologics. The FDA subjects biologics to extensive pre-and post-market regulation. The Public Health Service Act (PHSA), the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and other federal and state statutes and regulations govern, among other things, the research, non-clinical and clinical development, testing, manufacture, storage, recordkeeping, approval, labeling, promotion and marketing, distribution, post-approval monitoring and reporting, sampling, and import and export of biologics. Failure to comply with applicable U.S. requirements may subject a company to a variety of administrative or judicial sanctions, such as FDA refusal to approve pending BLAs, withdrawal of approvals, clinical holds, warning letters, product recalls, product seizures, total or partial suspension of production or distribution, injunctions, fines or civil or criminal penalties.

        The PHSA emphasizes the importance of manufacturing control for biological products whose attributes cannot be precisely defined. The PHSA also provides authority to the FDA to immediately suspend licenses in situations where there exists a danger to public health, to prepare or procure products in the event of shortages and critical public health needs, and to authorize the creation and enforcement of regulations to prevent the introduction or spread of communicable diseases in the United States and between states.

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        The process required by the FDA before a new biologic may be marketed in the United States is long and expensive and due to the nature of biological products inherently uncertain. Biologics development in the United States typically involves preclinical laboratory and animal tests, the submission to the FDA of an IND application which must become effective before clinical testing may commence. Furthermore, adequate and well-controlled clinical studies are required in order to establish the safety and effectiveness of the biologic for each indication for which FDA approval is sought. Developing the data to satisfy FDA marketing authorization requirements typically takes many years and the actual time required may vary substantially based upon the type, complexity, and novelty of the product or disease.

        Preclinical tests include laboratory evaluation of product chemistry, formulation, and toxicity, as well as animal studies to assess the characteristics and potential safety and efficacy of the product. The conduct of the preclinical tests must comply with federal regulations and requirements, including good laboratory (GLP) principles. The results of preclinical testing are submitted to the FDA as part of an IND along with other information, including information about product chemistry, manufacturing and controls, and a proposed clinical study protocol. Long term preclinical tests, such as animal tests of reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity, may continue after the IND is submitted.

        An IND must become effective before United States clinical studies may begin. A 30-day waiting period after the submission of each IND is required prior to the commencement of clinical testing in humans. If the FDA has does not issue a clinical hold within this 30-day period, the clinical study proposed in the IND may begin.

        Clinical studies involve the administration of the IND or biologic to healthy volunteers or patients with the condition under investigation, all under the supervision of a qualified investigator. Clinical studies must be conducted: (i) in compliance with federal regulations; (ii) in compliance with good clinical practice, or GCP, an international standard meant to protect the rights and health of patients and to define the roles of clinical study sponsors, investigators, and monitors; as well as (iii) under protocols detailing the objectives of the study, the parameters to be used in monitoring safety, and the effectiveness criteria to be evaluated. Each protocol involving testing on U.S. patients and subsequent protocol amendments must be submitted to the FDA as part of the IND.

        The FDA may order the temporary, or permanent, discontinuation of a clinical study at any time, or impose other sanctions, if it believes that the clinical study either is not being conducted in accordance with FDA requirements or presents an unacceptable risk to the clinical study participants. The study protocol and informed consent information for participants in clinical studies must also be submitted to an institutional review board (IRB) for approval. An IRB may also require the clinical study at the site to be halted, either temporarily or permanently, for failure to comply with the IRB's requirements, or may impose other conditions. The study sponsor may also suspend a clinical study at any time on various grounds, including a determination that the subjects or patients are being exposed to an unacceptable health risk.

        Clinical studies to support BLAs for marketing approval are typically conducted in three sequential phases, but the phases may overlap or be combined. In phase 1, the biologic is initially introduced into healthy human subjects or patients and is tested to assess PK, pharmacological actions, side effects associated with increasing doses, and, if possible, early evidence on effectiveness. In the case of some products for more severe or life-threatening diseases, such as cancer treatments, initial human testing may be conducted in the intended patient population. Phase 2 usually involves studies in a limited patient population to determine the effectiveness of the biologic for a particular indication, dosage tolerance, and optimum dosage, and to identify common adverse effects and safety risks. If a compound demonstrates evidence of effectiveness and an acceptable safety profile in phase 2 studies, phase 3 studies are undertaken to obtain additional information about clinical efficacy and safety in a larger number of patients, typically at

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geographically dispersed clinical study sites. These phase 3 clinical studies are intended to establish data sufficient to demonstrate substantial evidence of the efficacy and safety of the product to permit the FDA to evaluate the overall benefit-risk relationship of the biologic and to provide adequate information for the labeling of the biologic. Studies conducted outside of the US under similar, GCP-compliant conditions in accordance with local applicable laws may also be acceptable to the FDA in support of product licensing.

        Sponsors of clinical studies for investigational drugs must publicly disclose certain clinical study information, including detailed study design and study results in NIH public ClinicalTrials.gov databases. These requirements are subject to specific timelines and apply to most controlled clinical studies of FDA-regulated products.

        After completion of the required clinical testing, a Biologics License Application (BLA) is prepared and submitted to the FDA. FDA review and approval of the BLA is required before marketing of the product may begin in the United States. The BLA must include the results of all preclinical, clinical, and other testing and a compilation of data relating to the product's pharmacology, chemistry, manufacture and controls and must demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the product based on these results. The BLA must also contain extensive manufacturing information. The cost of preparing and submitting a BLA is substantial. Under federal law, the submission of most BLAs is additionally subject to a substantial application user fee, as well as annual product and establishment user fees, which may total several million dollars and are typically increased annually.

        The FDA has 60 days from its receipt of a BLA to determine whether the application will be accepted for filing based on the agency's threshold determination that it is sufficiently complete to permit substantive review. Once the submission is accepted for filing, the FDA begins an in-depth review. The FDA has agreed to certain performance goals in the review of BLAs. Most such applications for standard review biologics are reviewed within ten months from the date the application is accepted for filing. Although the FDA often meets its user fee performance goals, it can extend these timelines if necessary, and its review may not occur on a timely basis at all. The FDA usually refers applications for novel biologics many times to an advisory committee—typically a panel that includes clinicians and other experts—for review and evaluation of data concerning the safety and efficacy of marketed investigational drug products for use in the treatment of patients and makes appropriate recommendations to the FDA Commissioner. The FDA is not bound by the recommendation of an advisory committee, but it generally follows such recommendations. Before approving a BLA, the FDA will typically inspect one or more clinical sites to assure compliance with GCP. Additionally, the FDA will inspect the facility or the facilities at which the biologic is manufactured. The FDA will not approve the product unless it verifies that compliance with cGMP standards is satisfactory and the BLA contains data that provide substantial evidence that the biologic is safe and effective in the indication studied.

        After the FDA evaluates the BLA and the manufacturing facilities, it issues either an approval letter or a complete response letter. A complete response letter generally outlines the deficiencies in the submission which requires substantial additional testing and / or information, in order for the FDA to reconsider the application. Once those deficiencies have been addressed to the FDA's satisfaction in a resubmission of the BLA, the FDA will issue an approval letter. The FDA has committed to reviewing such resubmissions in two or six months depending on the type of information included. The FDA approval is never guaranteed, and the FDA may refuse to approve a BLA if applicable regulatory criteria are not satisfied.

        Under the PHSA, the FDA may approve a BLA if it determines that the product is safe, effective, pure and potent and the facility where the product will be manufactured meets standards designed to ensure that it continues to be safe, pure, and potent. An approval letter authorizes commercial marketing of the biologic with specific prescribing information for specific indications. The

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extension of an approval for a biologic may be significantly more limited than initially requested in the application, which might restrict the commercial value of the product. The FDA may also require that certain contraindications, warnings, or precautions are included in the prescription leaflet. In addition, as a condition of BLA approval, the FDA may require a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy (REMS) in order to track and thereby ensure that the benefits of the biologic outweigh the potential risks for patients. REMS can include medication guides, communication plans for healthcare professionals, and elements to assure safe use (ETASU). ETASU can include, but are not limited to, special training or certification for prescribing or dispensing, dispensing only under certain circumstances, special monitoring, and the use of patient registries. The requirement for a REMS might materially affect the potential market and profitability of the biologic. Moreover, product approval may require, as a condition of approval, substantial post-approval commitments, including, e.g., the testing and surveillance of the biologic's safety or efficacy. Once granted, product approvals may be withdrawn if compliance with regulatory standards is not maintained or safety concerns are identified following initial marketing.

        As part of the manufacturing process, the marketing authorization holder is required to perform specific tests for each drug substance and drug product batch before it is released for distribution. If the product is subject to official lot release by the FDA, marketing authorization holder has to submit specific release data of each product batch to the FDA together with a release protocol, showing a summary of previous release specification data from all the batches produced so far as well as the data from the current batch. The FDA may also perform certain confirmatory tests on batches of some products, such as viral vaccines, before releasing the lots for distribution by the manufacturer. In addition, the FDA conducts laboratory research related to the regulatory standards on the safety, purity, potency, and effectiveness of biological products. After approval of biologics, marketing authorization holder must address any safety issues that arise, are subject to recalls or a halt in manufacturing, and are subject to periodic inspection.

    Expedited Program

        Speeding the availability of drugs that treat serious diseases are in everyone's interest, in particular when the drugs are the first available treatment or if the drug has advantages over existing treatments. The FDA has developed four distinct approaches to making such drugs available as rapidly as possible: a) Priority Review, b) Breakthrough Therapy, c) Accelerated Approval and d) Fast Track. In short:

        Priority Review:    A Priority Review designation means that FDA's goal is to take action on the application within 6 months.

        Breakthrough Therapy:    A process designed to expedite the development and review of drugs which may demonstrate substantial improvement over available therapy.

        Accelerated Approval:    These regulations allow drugs for serious conditions that fill an unmet medical need to be approved based on a surrogate endpoint.

        Fast Track:    This is a process designed to facilitate the development and expedite the review of drugs to treat serious conditions and fill an unmet medical need.

    Biosimilars

        The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which we refer to as the Affordable Care Act, signed into law on March 23, 2010, includes a subtitle called the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act of 2009. That Act created an approval pathway authorizing the FDA to approve biosimilars. Biosimilars are biological products which are "highly similar" to a previously approved biologic product or "reference product" and for which there are no meaningful differences between

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the biosimilar product and the reference product in terms of analytics, safety, purity, potency and clinical efficacy. To date, several biosimilars have been approved under the BPCIA framework.

    Advertising and promotion

        Once a BLA is approved, a product will be subject to continuing post-approval regulatory requirements. For instance, the FDA closely regulates the post-approval marketing and promotion of biologics, including standards and regulations for direct-to-consumer advertising, off-label promotion, industry-sponsored scientific and educational activities and promotional activities involving the internet. Failure to comply with these regulations can result in significant penalties, including the issuance of warning letters directing a company to correct deviations from FDA standards, a requirement that future advertising and promotional materials be pre-cleared by the FDA, and federal and state civil and criminal investigations and prosecutions.

        Biologics may be marketed only for the approved indications and in accordance with the provisions of the approved labeling. Changes to some of the conditions established in an approved application, including changes in indications, labeling, or manufacturing processes or facilities, require submission and FDA approval of a new BLA or BLA supplement before the change can be implemented. A BLA supplement for a new indication typically requires clinical data similar to that in the original application, and the FDA uses the same procedures and actions in reviewing BLA supplements as it does in reviewing BLAs.

    Adverse event reporting and cGMP compliance

        Adverse event reporting and submission of periodic safety reports are required following FDA approval of a BLA. The FDA also may require post-marketing testing, known as phase 4 testing, REMS, and surveillance to monitor the effects of an approved product, or the FDA may place conditions on an approval that could restrict the distribution or use of the product. In addition, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, storage and distribution procedures must continue to conform to cGMPs after approval. Biologics manufacturers and certain of their subcontractors are required to register their establishments with the FDA and certain state agencies. Registration with the FDA subjects entities to periodic unannounced inspections by the FDA, during which the agency inspects manufacturing facilities to assess compliance with cGMPs. Accordingly, manufacturers must continue to expend time, money and effort in the areas of production and quality control to maintain compliance with cGMPs. Regulatory authorities may withdraw product approvals, request product recalls, or impose marketing restrictions through labeling changes or product removals if a company fails to comply with regulatory standards, if it encounters problems following initial marketing, or if previously unrecognized problems are subsequently discovered.

    Orphan drug

        Under the Orphan Drug Act, the FDA may grant orphan drug designation to biologics intended to treat a rare disease or condition—generally a disease or condition that affects fewer than 200,000 individuals in the United States. Orphan drug designation must be requested before submitting a BLA. After the FDA grants orphan drug designation, the generic identity of the biologic and its potential orphan use are disclosed publicly by the FDA. Orphan drug designation does not necessarily convey any advantage in, or shorten the duration of, the regulatory review and approval process. The first BLA applicant to receive FDA approval for a particular product to treat a particular disease with FDA orphan drug designation is entitled to a seven-year exclusive marketing period in the United States for that product, for that indication. During the seven-year exclusivity period, the FDA may not approve any other applications to market the same drug for the same disease, except in limited circumstances, such as a showing of clinical superiority to the product with orphan drug exclusivity. Orphan drug exclusivity does not prevent the FDA from approving a different biologic for

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the same disease or condition, or the same biologic for a different disease or condition. Among the other benefits of orphan drug designation are tax credits for certain research and a waiver of the BLA application user fee.

        We have received orphan drug designation for AFM13 for the treatment of HL in the United States and Europe and for and T-cell lymphoma in the United States

    Other healthcare laws and compliance requirements

        In the United States, our activities are potentially subject to regulation by federal, state, and local authorities in addition to the FDA, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, other divisions of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (for example, the Office of Inspector General), the U.S. Department of Justice and individual U.S. Attorney offices within the Department of Justice, and state and local governments.

EU Approval Process

        The EMA is a decentralized scientific agency of the European Union. It coordinates the evaluation and monitoring of centrally-authorized medicinal products. It is responsible for the scientific evaluation of applications for EU marketing authorizations, as well as the development of technical guidance and the provision of scientific advice to sponsors. The EMA decentralizes its scientific assessment of medicines by working through a network of about 4,500 experts throughout the European Union, nominated by the member states. The EMA draws on resources of over 40 National Competent Authorities (the NCAs) of EU member states. The Paul Ehrlich Institute, or PEI, is one of the NCAs for Germany, and regulates, among others, antibody products.

        The process regarding approval of medicinal products in the European Union follows roughly the same lines as in the United States and likewise generally involves satisfactorily completing each of the following:

    preclinical laboratory tests, animal studies and formulation studies all performed in accordance with the applicable EU Good Laboratory Practice regulations;

    submission to the relevant national authorities of a clinical study application or CTA for each study in humans, which must be approved before the study may begin;

    performance of adequate and well-controlled clinical studies to establish the safety and efficacy of the product for each proposed indication;

    submission to the relevant competent authorities of a Marketing Authorization Application or MAA, which includes the data supporting safety and efficacy as well as detailed information on the manufacture and composition of the product in clinical development and proposed labeling;

    satisfactory completion of an inspection by the relevant national authorities of the manufacturing facility or facilities, including those of third parties, at which the product is produced to assess compliance with strictly enforced current Good Manufacturing Practices;

    potential audits of the non-clinical and clinical study sites that generated the data in support of the MAA; and

    review and approval by the relevant competent authority of the MAA before any commercial marketing, sale or shipment of the product.

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    Preclinical studies

        Preclinical tests include laboratory evaluations of product chemistry, formulation and stability, as well as studies to evaluate toxicity in animal studies, in order to assess the potential safety and efficacy of the product. The conduct of the preclinical tests and formulation of the compounds for testing must comply with the relevant EU regulations and requirements. The results of the preclinical tests, together with relevant manufacturing information and analytical data, are submitted as part of the CTA.

    Clinical study approval

        Pursuant to the Clinical Trials Directive 2001/20/EC, as amended, a system for the approval of clinical studies in the European Union has been implemented through national legislation of the member states. Under this system, approval must be obtained from the competent national authority of each EU member state in which a study is planned to be conducted. To this end, a CTA is submitted, which must be supported by an investigational medicinal product dossier, or IMPD, and further supporting information prescribed by the Clinical Trials Directive and other applicable guidance documents. Furthermore, a clinical study may only be started after a competent ethics committee has issued a favorable opinion on the clinical study application in that country.

        Manufacturing and import into the EU of investigational medicinal products is subject to the holding of appropriate authorizations and must be carried out in accordance with current Good Manufacturing Practices.

    Health authority interactions

        During the development of a medicinal product, frequent interactions with the health authorities are important to ensure all relevant input and guidelines/regulations are taken into account in the overall program. We have had several interactions with the FDA as well as European competent authorities (both national and EMA) at key timepoints in the development of our antibody products.

    Paediatric studies

        Regulation (EC) 1901/2006, which came into force on January 26, 2007, aims to facilitate the development and accessibility of medical products for use in children without subjecting children to unnecessary studies, or delaying the authorization of medicinal products for use in adults. The regulation established the Paediatric Committee, or PDCO, which is responsible for coordinating the EMA's activities regarding medicines for children. The PDCO's main role is to determine all the studies that marketing authorization applicants need to do in the pediatric population as part of the so-called Paediatric Investigation Plans, or PIPs. All applications for marketing authorization for new medicines that were not authorized in the European Union before January 26, 2007 have to include either the results of studies carried out in children of different ages (as agreed with the PDCO), or proof that a waiver or a deferral of these studies has been obtained from the PDCO. As indicated, the PDCO determines what pediatric studies are necessary and describes them in a PIP. This requirement for pediatric studies also applies when a company wants to add a new indication, pharmaceutical form or route of administration for a medicine that is already authorized. The PDCO can grant deferrals for some medicines, allowing a company to delay development of the medicine in children until there is enough information to demonstrate its effectiveness and safety in adults and can also grant waivers when development of a medicine in children is not needed or is not appropriate, such as for diseases that only affect the elderly population.

        Before a MAA can be filed, or an existing marketing authorization can be varied, the EMA checks that companies are in compliance with the agreed studies and measures listed in each relevant PIP.

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        Regulation (EC) 1901/2006 also introduced several incentives for the development of medicines for children in the EU:

    medicines that have been authorized across the European Union in compliance with an agreed PIP are eligible for an extension of their patent protection by six months. This is the case even when the pediatric studies' results are negative;

    for orphan medicines, the incentive is an additional two years of market exclusivity, extending the typical 10-year period to 12 years;

    scientific advice and protocol assistance at the EMA are free of charge for questions relating to the development of medicines for children; and

    medicines developed specifically for children that are already authorized but are not protected by a patent or supplementary protection certificate may be eligible for a paediatric use marketing authorization, or PUMA. If a PUMA is granted, the product will benefit from 10 years of market protection as an incentive for the development of the product for use in children.

        The indications we pursue, especially those in certain hematologic malignancies, involve pediatric patients and we shall prepare PIPs at the appropriate time.

    Marketing authorization application

        Authorization to market a product in the EU member states proceeds under one of four procedures: a centralized authorization procedure, a mutual recognition procedure, a decentralized procedure or a national procedure. Since our products by their virtue of being antibody-based biologics fall under the mandatory scope of the centralized procedure, only this procedure will be described here.

    Centralized authorization procedure

        Certain drugs, including medicinal products developed by means of biotechnological processes, must be approved via the centralized authorization procedure for marketing authorization. A successful application under the centralized authorization procedure results in a marketing authorization from the European Commission, which is automatically valid in all EU member states. The other European Economic Area member states (namely Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein) are also obligated to recognize the Commission decision. The EMA and the European Commission administer the centralized authorization procedure.

        Under the centralized authorization procedure, the CHMP serves as the scientific committee that renders opinions about the safety, efficacy and quality of human products on behalf of the EMA. The CHMP is composed of experts nominated by each member state's national drug authority, with one of them appointed to act as Rapporteur for the co-ordination of the evaluation with the possible assistance of a further member of the Committee acting as a Co-Rapporteur. After approval, the Rapporteur(s) continue to monitor the product throughout its life cycle. The CHMP is required to issue an opinion on an initial MAA within 210 days of receipt of a valid application, though the clock is stopped if it is necessary to ask the applicant for clarification or further supporting data. The process is complex and involves extensive consultation with the regulatory authorities of member states and a number of experts. If the CHMP concludes that the quality, safety and efficacy of the medicinal product are sufficiently proven, it adopts a positive opinion. The CHMP's opinion is sent to the European Commission, which uses the opinion as the basis for its decision whether or not to grant a marketing authorization. If the opinion is negative, information is given as to the grounds on which this conclusion was reached. Once the procedure is completed, a European Public Assessment Report, or EPAR, is produced.

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        After a drug has been authorized and launched, it is a condition of maintaining the marketing authorization that all aspects relating to its quality, safety and efficacy must be kept under review. Sanctions may be imposed for failure to adhere to the conditions of the marketing authorization. In extreme cases, the authorization may be revoked, resulting in withdrawal of the product from sale.

    Accelerated assessment procedure

        When an application is submitted for a marketing authorization in respect of a drug for human use which is of major interest from the point of view of public health and in particular from the viewpoint of therapeutic innovation, the applicant may request an accelerated assessment procedure pursuant to Article 14(9) of Regulation (EC) 726/2004. Under the accelerated assessment procedure, the CHMP is required to issue an opinion within 150 days of receipt of a valid application, subject to clock stops. We believe that many of our product candidates may qualify for this provision and we will take advantage of this provision as appropriate.

    Conditional approval

        As per Article 14(7) of Regulation (EC) 726/2004, a medicine that would fulfill an unmet medical need may, if its immediate availability is in the interest of public health, be granted a conditional marketing authorization on the basis of less complete clinical data than are normally required, subject to specific obligations being imposed on the authorization holder. These specific obligations are to be reviewed annually by the EMA. The list of these obligations shall be made publicly accessible. Such an authorization shall be valid for one year, on a renewable basis.

    Period of authorization and renewals

        A marketing authorization is initially valid for five years and may then be renewed on the basis of a re-evaluation of the risk-benefit balance by the EMA or by the competent authority of the authorizing member state. To this end, the marketing authorization holder shall provide the EMA or the competent authority with a consolidated version of the file in respect of quality, safety and efficacy, including all variants introduced since the marketing authorization was granted, at least six months before the marketing authorization ceases to be valid. Once renewed, the marketing authorization shall be valid for an unlimited period, unless the Commission or the competent authority decides, on justified grounds relating to pharmacovigilance, to proceed with one additional five-year renewal. Any authorization which is not followed by the actual placing of the drug on the EU market (in case of centralized procedure) or on the market of the authorizing member state within three years after authorization shall cease to be valid (the so-called sunset clause).

    Orphan drug designation

        Regulation (EC) 141/2000 states that a drug shall be designated as an orphan drug if its sponsor can establish:

    (a)
    (i)        that it is intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a life-threatening or chronically debilitating condition affecting not more than five in 10,000 persons in the European Union when the application is made, or;

    (a)
    (ii)       that it is intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a life-threatening, seriously debilitating or serious and chronic condition in the European Union and that without incentives it is unlikely that the marketing of the drug in the European Union would generate sufficient return to justify the necessary investment; and

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    (b)
    that there exists no satisfactory method of diagnosis, prevention or treatment of the condition in question that has been authorized in the European Union or, if such method exists, the drug will be of significant benefit to those affected by that condition.

        Regulation (EC) 847/2000 sets out criteria for the designation of orphan drugs.

        An application for designation as an orphan product can be made any time prior to the filing of an application for approval to market the product. Marketing authorization for an orphan drug leads to a ten-year period of market exclusivity. This period may, however, be reduced to six years if, at the end of the fifth year, it is established that the product no longer meets the criteria for orphan drug designation, for example because the product is sufficiently profitable not to justify continued market exclusivity. Market exclusivity can be revoked only in very selected cases, such as consent from the marketing authorization holder, inability to supply sufficient quantities of the product, demonstration of "clinically relevant superiority" by a similar medicinal product, or, after a review by the Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products, requested by a member state in the fifth year of the marketing exclusivity period (if the designation criteria are believed to no longer apply). Medicinal products designated as orphan drugs pursuant to Regulation (EC) 141/2000 shall be eligible for incentives made available by the European Union and by the member states to support research into, and the development and availability of, orphan drugs.

        We have applied for and been granted orphan status in the European Union for AFM13 for the treatment of HL.

    Regulatory data protection

        Without prejudice to the law on the protection of industrial and commercial property, marketing authorizations for new medicinal products benefit from an 8+2+1 year period of regulatory protection.

        This regime consists of a regulatory data protection period of eight years plus a concurrent market exclusivity of ten years plus an additional market exclusivity of one further year if, during the first eight years of those ten years, the marketing approval holder obtains an approval for one or more new therapeutic indications which, during the scientific evaluation prior to their approval, are determined to bring a significant clinical benefit in comparison with existing therapies. Under the current rules, a third party may reference the preclinical and clinical data of the reference product beginning eight years after first approval, but the third party may market a generic version only after ten (or eleven) years have lapsed.

        As indicated, an additional period of exclusivity can be applied for when an applicant has complied with all requirements as set forth in an approved PIP.

International Regulation

        In addition to regulations in the United States and Europe, a variety of foreign regulations govern clinical studies, commercial sales, and distribution of product candidates. The approval process varies from country to country and the time to approval may be longer or shorter than that required for FDA or European Commission approval.

Pharmaceutical Coverage, Pricing, and Reimbursement

        In the United States and other countries, sales of any products for which we receive regulatory approval for commercial sale will depend in part on the availability of reimbursement from third-party payors, including government health administrative authorities, managed care providers, private health insurers, and other organizations. Third-party payors are increasingly examining the medical necessity and cost effectiveness of medical products and services in addition to safety and efficacy and, accordingly, significant uncertainty exists as to the reimbursement status of newly approved

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therapeutics. Third-party reimbursement adequate to enable us to realize an appropriate return on our investment in research and product development may not be available for our products.

        The division of competences within the European Union leaves to Member States the power to organize their own social security systems, including health care policies to promote the financial stability of their health care insurance systems. According to Article 168 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union or TFEU, "Union action shall respect the responsibilities of the Member States for the definition of their health policy and for the organization and delivery of health services and medical care."

        In this context, the national authorities are free to set the prices of medicinal products and to designate the treatments that they wish to reimburse under their social security system. However, the European Union has defined a common procedural framework through the adoption of Council Directive 89/105/EEC, which is generally known as the "Transparency Directive." This instrument aims to ensure that national pricing and reimbursement decisions are made in a transparent manner and do not disrupt the operation of the internal market.

        The Pharmaceutical Pricing and Reimbursement systems established by Member States are usually quite complex. Each country uses different schemes and policies, adapted to its own economic and health needs. We would have to develop or access special expertise in this field to prepare health economic dossiers on our medicinal products if we would market our products, if and when approved, in the EU.

C.  Organizational structure

        The registrant corporation Affimed N.V. has three direct or indirect wholly owned subsidiaries—Affimed GmbH, AbCheck s.r.o. and Affimed, Inc. that are each listed in Exhibit 8.1 filed hereto. We primarily operate our business out of our operating subsidiary, Affimed GmbH. AbCheck s.r.o., and Affimed, Inc. are direct subsidiaries of the operating subsidiary Affimed GmbH.

D.  Property, plant and equipment

        Our headquarters are in Heidelberg, Germany, where we occupy office and laboratory space at the Technologiepark (Technology Park). Approximately 60% of this space is under a revolving 24-month lease period, with a 12-month termination period. The lease could expire in 2023 if notice to terminate is provided by either party by February 2022. No such notice has been received to date. Approximately 30% of this facility was under a fixed term lease period until February 2021 and prolongations are currently in preparation. The remaining 10% is under a fixed term lease period until March 2025. This facility serves as the corporate headquarters and central laboratory facility. We also lease office and laboratory space in the Czech Republic that is contracted until December 2025 with a period of notice of three months. We believe that our existing facilities are adequate to meet current needs and that suitable additional alternative spaces will be available in the future on commercially reasonable terms.

ITEM 4A.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        Not applicable.

ITEM 5.    OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

        You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with the information under "Selected Financial Data" and our consolidated audited financial statements, including the notes thereto, included in this Annual Report. The following discussion is based on our financial information prepared in accordance with IFRS as

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issued by the IASB, which might differ in material respects from generally accepted accounting principles in other jurisdictions. The following discussion includes forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including, but not limited to, those described under "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this Annual Report.

A.  Operating Results Overview

        We are a clinical-stage immuno-oncology company focused on discovering and developing highly targeted cancer immunotherapies. Our product candidates are being developed in the field of immuno-oncology, which represents an innovative approach to cancer treatment that seeks to harness the body's own immune defenses to fight tumor cells. The most potent cells of the human defense arsenal are types of white blood cells called innate immune cells (Natural Killer cells, or NK cells and macrophages) and T cells. Leveraging our fit-for-purpose ROCK® platform, we develop proprietary, next-generation bispecific antibodies, so-called innate cell engagers, which are designed to direct and establish a bridge between innate immune cells and cancer cells. Our innate cell engagers have the ability to bring innate immune cells into proximity and trigger a signal cascade that leads to the destruction of cancer cells. Due to their novel tetravalent architecture (which provides for four binding domains), our innate cell engagers bind to their targets with high affinity and have half-lives that allow regular intravenous administration, with different dosing schemes being explored to allow for improved exposure in heavily pretreated patient populations. Antibodies developed from our ROCK® platform include molecules which we refer to as innate cell engagers. We believe, based on their mechanism of action and the preclinical and clinical data we have generated to date, that our product candidates, alone or in combination, may ultimately improve response rates, clinical outcomes and survival in cancer patients and could eventually become a cornerstone of modern targeted oncology care. Building on our leadership in the innate immune cell space, we are also developing novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody formats with the potential to tailor immune-engaging therapy to different indications and settings.

        To date, we have financed our operations primarily through our public offerings of our common shares, private placements of equity securities, the incurrence of loans including convertible loans and through government grants and payments for collaborative research and development services. Through December 31, 2020, we have raised an aggregate of €332.5 million through the issuance of equity and incurrence of loans. To date, we have not generated any revenues from product sales or royalties. Based on our current plans, we do not expect to generate product or royalty revenues unless and until we or any collaboration partner obtain marketing approval for, and commercialize, any of our product candidates.

        We have generated losses since we began our drug development operations in 2000. For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred a net loss of €41.4 million. As of December 31, 2020, we had an accumulated deficit of €275.9 million.

        We expect to continue incurring losses as we continue our preclinical and clinical development programs, apply for marketing approval for our product candidates and, subject to obtaining regulatory approval for our product candidates, build a marketing and sales team to commercialize our product candidates. Our profitability is dependent upon the successful development, approval, and commercialization of our product candidates and achieving a level of revenues adequate to support our cost structure. We may never achieve profitability, and unless and until we do, we will continue to need to raise additional cash. We intend to fund future operations through additional equity and debt financings, and we may seek additional capital through arrangements with strategic partners or from other sources.

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Collaboration Agreements

        We have entered into strategic collaborations for some of our therapeutic programs. As part of our business development strategy, we aim to increase the number of our research collaborations in order to derive further value from our platforms and more fully exploit their potential. Key terms of our current material collaborations are summarized below and more details are given under "Item 4. B. Business overview".

Roivant

        On November 9, 2020, we announced that we entered into a license and strategic collaboration agreement with a subsidiary of Roivant Sciences Ltd. ("Roivant") to develop and commercialize novel ICE® molecules, including AFM32, in oncology. Under the terms of the agreement, we will receive $60 million in upfront consideration, comprised of $40 million in cash and pre-paid R&D funding, and $20 million of newly issued shares in Roivant Sciences Ltd. We are eligible to receive up to an additional $2 billion in milestones over time upon achievement of specified development, regulatory and commercial milestones, as well as tiered royalties on net sales.

        We recognized revenues of €1.4 million in 2020.

Genentech

        On August 24, 2018 we entered into a research collaboration and license agreement with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, for the development and commercialization of certain product candidates that contain novel NK cell engager-based immunotherapeutics to treat multiple cancers. Under the terms of the agreement, in the fourth quarter of 2018 we received $96 million in initial upfront payments and other funding and additional payments in 2019 for development milestones and a final target nomination.

        We recognized revenues of €26.2 million in 2020.

Financial Operations Overview

Revenue

        To date, our revenues have consisted principally of collaboration and service revenue.

        Collaboration revenue.    Collaboration revenue of €19.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 was from the Genentech collaboration. Collaboration revenue for year ended December 31, 2020 amounted to €27.8 million, with €26.2 million from the Genentech collaboration and €1.4 million from the Roivant collaboration.

        Service revenue.    Service revenue is primarily revenue from service contracts entered into by AbCheck, our wholly owned, independently operated antibody screening platform. We recognized €1.7 million and €0.6 million of service revenue in 2019 and 2020, respectively. Service revenue of AbCheck is derived from third party contracts as well as from the utilization of the entity by Affimed. The increase or decrease of the use of AbCheck's service capabilities by Affimed has an impact on AbCheck's ability to generate third party revenues.

        In the future, the timing of our revenue may vary significantly from the receipt of the related cash flows, as the revenue from some upfront or initiation payments is deferred and recognized as revenue over the estimated service period, while other revenue is earned when received, such as milestone payments or service fees.

        Our revenue has varied substantially, especially due to the impact of collaboration revenue received from Genentech. The amount of future revenue is dependent on the services performed

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and milestones reached for our existing collaborations and on our ability to conclude new collaboration arrangements and the terms we are able to negotiate with our partners.

Other Income

        Other income for years 2019 and 2020 primarily relates to foreign exchange gains and income from government grants for research and development projects of €348,000 in 2020 and €19,000 in 2019.

Research and Development Expenses

        Research and development expenses consist principally of:

    salaries for research and development staff and related expenses, including benefits;

    costs for production of preclinical compounds and drug substances by contract manufacturers;

    fees and other costs paid to contract research organizations in connection with additional preclinical testing and the performance of clinical trials;

    costs of related facilities, materials and equipment;

    costs associated with obtaining and maintaining patents and other intellectual property;

    amortization and depreciation of tangible and intangible fixed assets used to develop our product candidates; and

    expenses for share-based payments.

        Based on our current budget we expect that our total research and development expenses in 2021 will increase as compared to 2020. Our research and development expenses primarily relate to the following key programs:

    AFM13.  The following is a summary of completed and ongoing research and development activities for AFM13:

    In November 2019, we initiated a registration directed phase 2 study of AFM13 as monotherapy in relapsed or refractory patients suffering from peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL). In March 2021, we announced positive results from an interim futility analysis for the study, and accordingly the study will continue to enroll patients until we reach approximately 100 - 110 response evaluable patients.

    In September 2020, a phase 1 clinical study was initiated in collaboration with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), in which MDACC is investigating the combination of AFM13 with allogeneic NK cells. MDACC is administering a stable complex of AFM13 pre-complexed with cord blood-derived allogeneic NK cells in different doses (numbers of pre-complexed NK cells) into patients with relapsed/refractory CD30-positive lymphoid malignancies.

    In 2017, an investigator-sponsored Phase 1b/2a study was initiated by Columbia University to investigate AFM13 as monotherapy in patients with relapsed or refractory CD30-positive lymphoma with cutaneous manifestation, and the study is now complete.

    In 2016, we initiated a phase 1b study investigating the combination of AFM13 with Merck's anti-PD1 antibody Keytruda® (pembrolizumab) in patients with relapsed/refractory HL and the study is now complete..

    In 2015, an investigator-initiated monotherapeutic phase 2a clinical trial of AFM13 in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma was initiated and the study is now complete..

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      We anticipate that our research and development expenses in 2021 for AFM13 will increase compared to those for 2020 due to the initiation of new clinical studies, pre-clinical studies with collaboration partners and the scale-up of the production of AFM13 for commercial purposes.

    AFM11.  The phase 1 clinical trials of AFM11 were placed on clinical hold and recruitment stopped in October 2018. In May 2019, we received notification from the FDA that additional data would be needed to determine whether the AFM11 clinical hold may be lifted. In line with the strategic focus on our innate immunity portfolio, we have made the decision to terminate the phase 1 clinical program of AFM11. This decision took into consideration the competitive landscape of B-cell directed therapies currently in development and associated resources needed for further development of AFM11. We subsequently informed the FDA of our intention to terminate the clinical program.

    AFM24.  AFM24, a tetravalent, bispecific epidermal growth factor receptor, and CD16A-binding innate cell engager, is in currently enrolling a phase 1/2a clinical trial in patients with advanced cancers known to express EGFR. During 2021, we expect to initiate clinical trials evaluating the combination of AFM24 with adoptive NK cell transfer and anti-PD-L1 therapies, subject to receipt of FDA clearance. We anticipate that our research and development expenses in 2021 for AFM24 will increase compared to those for 2020 due to the initiation of new clinical trials.

    Other projects and infrastructure costs.  Our other research and development expenses relate to our Genentech, Roivant and Artiva collaborations, and early-stage development/discovery activities, including those for AFM28. We have allocated a material amount of our resources to such discovery activities. The expenses mainly consist of salaries, manufacturing costs for pre-clinical study material and pre-clinical studies. In addition, we incur a significant amount of costs associated with our research and development that are non-project specific, including intellectual property-related expenses, depreciation expenses and facility costs. Because these are less dependent on individual ongoing programs, they are not allocated to specific projects. We assume that other projects and infrastructure costs will increase in 2021 due to increased early-stage development/discovery activities.

        Since January 1, 2012, we have cumulatively spent €235.2 million on research and development. In the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019 and 2020, we spent €35.1 million, €43.8 million and €50.0 million, respectively, on research and development; €8.7 million, €19.5 million and €19.1 million thereof on AFM13; €5.8 million, €2.4 million and -€0.8 million thereof on AFM11 and €5.8 million, €4.3 million and €8.7 million thereof on AFM24. Our research and development expenses may vary substantially from period to period based on the timing of our research and development activities, including due to timing of initiation of clinical trials and enrollment of patients in clinical trials. Research and development expenses are expected to increase as we advance and broaden the clinical development of AFM13, AFM24 and certain of our other product candidates and further advance the research and development of our preclinical product candidates. The successful development of our product candidates is highly uncertain. At this time we cannot reasonably estimate the nature, timing and estimated costs of the efforts that will be necessary to complete the development of, or the period, if any, in which material net cash inflows may commence from, any of our product candidates. This is due to numerous risks and uncertainties associated with developing drugs, including the uncertainty of:

    the scope, rate of progress, results and cost of our clinical trials, nonclinical testing, and other related activities;

    the cost of manufacturing clinical supplies and establishing commercial supplies of our product candidates and any products that we may develop;

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    the number and characteristics of product candidates that we pursue;

    the cost, timing, and outcomes of regulatory approvals;

    the cost and timing of establishing sales, marketing, and distribution capabilities; and

    the terms and timing of any collaborative, licensing, and other arrangements that we may establish, including any milestone and royalty payments thereunder.

        A change in the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of AFM13, AFM24 or any other product candidate that we may develop could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of such product candidate. For example, if the FDA or other regulatory authority were to require us to conduct preclinical and clinical studies beyond those which we currently anticipate will be required for the completion of clinical development, if we experience significant delays in enrollment in any clinical trials or if we encounter difficulties in manufacturing our clinical supplies, we could be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of the clinical development.

General and Administrative Expenses

        Our general and administrative expenses consist principally of:

    salaries for employees other than research and development staff, including benefits;

    business development expenses, including travel expenses;

    professional fees for auditors and other consulting expenses not related to research and development activities;

    professional fees for lawyers not related to the protection and maintenance of our intellectual property;

    cost of facilities, communication and office expenses;

    IT expenses;

    amortization and depreciation of tangible and intangible fixed assets not related to research and development activities; and

    expenses for share-based payments.

        We expect that our general and administrative expenses in 2021 will be higher compared to the expenses in 2020, and will further increase in the future as our business expands. These increases will likely include costs of additional personnel, additional legal fees, accounting and audit fees, managing directors' and supervisory directors' liability insurance premiums and costs related to investor relations. In addition, we may grant share-based compensation awards to key management personnel and other employees.

Results of Operations

        The numbers below have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020. The discussion below should be read along with these financial statements, and it is qualified in its entirety by reference to them.

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Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020

 
  Year ended December 31,  
 
  2019   2020  
 
  (in € thousand)
 

Total Revenue:

    21,391     28,360  

Other income/(expenses)—net

    290     626  

Research and development expenses

    (43,791 )   (49,989 )

General and administrative expenses

    (10,266 )   (13,715 )

Operating income/(loss)

    (32,376 )   (34,718 )

Finance income/(costs)—net

    15     (6,647 )

Income/(Loss) before tax

    (32,361 )   (41,365 )

Income taxes

    (4 )   (1 )

Income/(loss) for the period

    (32,365 )   (41,366 )

Total comprehensive income/(loss)

    (32,997 )   (41,608 )

Earnings/(loss) per common share in € per share

    (0.50 )   (0.50 )

    Revenue

        Revenue increased from € 21.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 to €28.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. Revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020 largely consisted of revenue from the Genentech collaboration. The increase in revenue in 2020 as compared to 2019 was primarily driven by an increase in revenues from our Genentech collaboration and revenues recognized from our collaboration with Roivant, which was signed in November 2020.

    Research and development expenses

 
  Year ended December 31,    
 
R&D Expenses by Project
  2019   2020   Change %  
 
   
  (in € thousand)
   
 

Project

                   

AFM13

    19,471     19,089     (2 )%

AFM11

    2,418     (777 )    

AFM24

    4,327     8,660     100 %

Other projects and infrastructure costs

    16,671     21,493     29 %

Share-based payment expense

    904     1,524     69 %

Total

    43,791     49,989     14 %

        Research and development expenses increased 14% from €43.8 million in the year ended December 31, 2019 to €50.0 million in the year ended December 31, 2020, due to higher expenses for AFM24 and for other projects and infrastructure. The variances in project related expenses between the year ended December 31, 2019 and the corresponding period in 2020 are mainly due to the following projects:

    AFM13.  In the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred lower expenses (2%) than in the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily due to lower expenses for manufacturing activities for clinical trial material.

    AFM11.  In the year ended December 31, 2020, no significant costs were incurred, however, we did recognize refunds from service providers following the termination of clinical trials, as well as from the reversal of provisions for possible termination costs which were initially recognized in 2019. The majority of the expenses in the year ended December 31, 2019

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      related to costs for the termination of the phase 1 dose-finding study in NHL and the phase 1 dose-finding study in ALL.

    AFM24.  In the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred significantly higher expenses (100%) which related to the initiation of the phase 1/2a clinical trial and manufacturing activities for the clinical trial material. Expenses in the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily related to the preparation of the phase 1/2a clinical trial and manufacturing activities for the clinical trial material.

    Other projects and infrastructure costs.  In the year ended December 31, 2020, expenses increased (29%) compared to the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily due to higher expenses incurred in relation to our discovery/early stage development activities and infrastructure costs.

    General and administrative expenses

        General and administrative expenses increased 33.6% from €10.3 million in the year ended December 31, 2019 to €13.7 million in the year ended December 31, 2020. In 2020, general and administrative expenses were largely comprised of personnel expenses of €6.3 million (2019: €5.4 million) which increased predominately due to higher headcount and legal, consulting and audit costs of €5.6 million (2019: €3.1 million). Legal, consulting and audit costs increased compared to 2019 primarily due to an increase in fees paid to outside legal firms for matters related to existing and new license agreements, including the termination of our license agreement with Xoma and our agreement with Roivant, and an increase in legal fees related to SEC reporting matters.

    Finance income / (costs)-net

        We recognized finance net costs for the year ended December 31, 2020 of €6.6 million compared to €15,000 income for the year ended December 31, 2019. The year ended December 31, 2020 was primarily affected by foreign exchange losses of €6.7 million primarily related to assets denominated in U.S. dollars as a result of the weakening of the U.S. dollar compared to the Euro during 2020. The year ended December 31, 2019 was primarily affected by interest income of €0.6 million and interest expenses of €0.5 million.

    Income tax expense

        During the year ended December 31, 2020, we recorded income tax expense of €1,000 compared to €4,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019 due to changes in deferred taxes.

Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019

    Refer to our Annual Report on Form 20-F for fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

Critical Judgments and Accounting Estimates

        The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with IFRS requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

        Estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimates are revised and in any future periods affected.

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        Information about assumptions and estimation uncertainties that have a significant risk of resulting in a material adjustment within the next financial year are listed below. For further details, please refer to our consolidated financial statements, specifically the section "Critical judgements and accounting estimates" in note 4, as well as the note references provided below.

    Share-Based Payments (note 4 and note 19)

    Revenue Recognition (note 4 and note 6)

    Financial instruments (note 4 and note 14)

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

        We refer to note 4 to our consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020 with regards to new standards and interpretations not yet adopted by us.

JOBS Act Exemptions

        As September 17, 2019 represented the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of our common shares pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act, we no longer qualify as an "emerging growth company" as defined in the JOBS Act, commencing December 31, 2019. As a result, our independent registered public accounting firm is required to attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404. An independent assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls could detect problems that our management's assessment might not. Undetected material weaknesses in our internal controls could lead to financial statement restatements and require us to incur the expense of remediation.

B.  Liquidity and Capital Resources

        Since our inception, we have not generated any revenue from product sales and we have incurred significant operating losses. For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020 we incurred net losses of €32.4 million and €41.4 million, respectively. We have funded our operations to date with the proceeds principally from the sales of of our common shares and payments from collaboration partners.

        Our cash and cash equivalents as of December 31, 2020 consist primarily of deposits in current, savings and deposit accounts with original maturities of three months or less. We expect to continue this investment philosophy, though we may in the future decide to invest our available liquidity in other financial instruments. Based on our current operating and budget assumptions, we believe that our existing liquidity will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements at least into the second half of 2023.

        As part of our contractual obligations, we are also bound by certain operating lease obligations. Operating lease obligations consist of payments pursuant to non-cancellable operating lease agreements relating to our lease of office and laboratory space. Approximately 60% of the space in Germany is under a revolving 24-month lease period, with a 12-month termination period. The lease could expire in 2023 if notice to terminate is provided by either party by February 2022. No such notice has been received to date. Approximately 30% of this facility was under a fixed term lease period until February 2021 and prolongations are currently in preparation. The remaining 10% is under a fixed term lease period until March 2025. We also lease office and laboratory space in the Czech Republic that is contracted until December 2025 with a period of notice of three months.

        During 2020, we entered into two 'at-the-market' share sale agreements which resulted in the sale of in total approximately 20.4 million common shares primarily to new investors. In May 2020, we implemented a $50 million at-the-market (ATM) program that resulted in the sale of 12.5 million

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common shares and generated net proceeds of €34.5 million in the aggregate. In November 2020, we entered into a new $75 million ATM program, and as of December 31, 2020 an additional 7.9 million common shares had been sold under the new ATM program, generating net proceeds of €34.5 million.

Cash Flows

    Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020

        The table below summarizes our consolidated statement of cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2020:

 
  Year ended December 31,  
 
  2019   2020  
 
  (in € thousand)
 

Net cash from/(used) in operating activities

    (29,056 )   (19,400 )

Net cash from/(used) for investing activities

    4,340     8,006  

Net cash generated from financing activities

    26,038     69,252  

Net changes to cash and cash equivalents

    1,322     57,858  

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year

    94,829     95,234  

Exchange-rate related changes of cash and cash equivalents

    (917 )   (6,238 )

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the year

    95,234     146,854  

        Net cash used in operating activities amounted to €29.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 whereas net cash used in operating activities amounted to €19.4 million in the year ended December 31, 2020. The amount in 2020 includes an initial upfront payment and committed funding of €33.3 million (USD 40 million) from the Roivant collaboration.

        We generated cash from investing activities of €4.3 million in the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to €8.0 million in the year ended December 31, 2020. The investing activities primarily relate to investments in and proceeds from the sale or maturity of financial assets.

        Net cash generated from financing activities in the year ended December 31, 2020 amounted to €69.3 million (2019: €26.0 million) and relate primarily to the net proceeds received from the at-the-market sale of common shares amounting to €69.0 million.

Comparison of the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019

        Refer to our Annual Report on Form 20-F for fiscal year ended December 31, 2019.

Cash and Funding Sources

        Our cash and cash equivalents as of December 31, 2020 were €146.9 million. Funding sources generally comprise proceeds from the issuance of equity instruments, loans, payments from collaboration agreements and government grants.

        On November 30, 2016, our subsidiary Affimed GmbH entered into a loan agreement with Silicon Valley Bank, a California corporation ("SVB"), as lender, which we fully guarantee. The loan agreement provides us with a senior secured term loan facility (the "SVB Credit Facility") for originally up to €10.0 million, which agreement was amended in May 2017 to provide that such amount would be available in three tranches.

        On December 8, 2016, we drew down the initial tranche of €5.0 million, and on May 31, 2017 we drew down the second tranche of € 2.5 million; the availability of the third tranche expired in

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September 2017 with such amount remaining undrawn. In connection with such drawdowns, we issued SVB warrants to purchase 219,692 of our common shares, at a weighted-average exercise price of $2.07 per common share. The SVB Credit Facility matured in November 2020.

        On January 25, 2017, we sold 10,000,000 of our common shares at a price of $1.80 per share in an underwritten public offering and received $16.6 million in net proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses. The underwriters partially executed an option to purchase additional shares and on February 9, 2017 we sold an additional 646,762 shares at a price of $1.80 per share and received $1.1 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

        On February 15, 2018, we sold an additional 13,225,000 of our common shares at a price of $2.00 per share in an underwritten public offering and received $24.5 million in net proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

        On November 13, 2019, we sold an additional 13,800,000 of our common shares at a price of $2.50 per share in an underwritten public offering and received $32.0 million in net proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

        In May 2020, we implemented a $50 million at-the-market (ATM) program providing for the sale of shares over time, which resulted in the sale of in total 12.5 million common shares and generated net proceeds of €34.5 million in the aggregate. In November 2020, we entered into a new ATM program for an amount not to exceed $75 million, and as of December 31, 2020 a further 7.9 million common shares were sold, generating net proceeds of €34.5 million in the aggregate.

        On January 8, 2021, we entered into a new loan agreement with SVB. The loan agreement provides us with a senior secured term loan facility (the "2021 SVB Credit Facility") for up to €25.0 million, of which €10.0 million was available at closing and drawn in February 2021, and €15.0 million of which is available in two additional tranches of €7.5 million each, subject to the satisfaction of certain milestones and conditions.

        The interest rate on amounts borrowed under the 2021 SVB Credit Facility is calculated as the sum of (i) the European Central Bank Base Rate plus (ii) an applicable margin of 5.5%, with European Central Bank Base Rate deemed to equal zero percent if the European Central Bank Base Rate is less than zero percent. The 2021 SVB Credit Facility matures in November 2025 with an interest-only period through December 1, 2022, or June 1, 2023 if we draw on all tranches of the loan, with amortized payments of principal and interest thereafter in equal monthly installments. Borrowings under the 2021 SVB Credit Facility are secured by a pledge of 100% of our shares in Affimed GmbH, all intercompany accounts receivables owed by our subsidiaries to us and a security assignment of essentially all our bank accounts, inventory, trade receivables and payment claims as specified in the loan agreement governing the facility.

        On January 15, 2021, we closed the sale of 16,666,667 of our common shares at a price of $6.00 per share in an underwritten public offering. Concurrent with closing, underwriters exercised an option to purchase additional shares and we sold an additional 2,500,000 shares at a price of $6.00 per share. We received approximately $108 million in net proceeds from the offering, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and other offering expenses.

Funding Requirements

        We expect that we will require additional funding to complete the development of our product candidates and to continue to advance the development of our other product candidates. In addition, we expect that we will require additional capital to commercialize our product candidates, including AFM13, AFM24 and AFM28. If we receive regulatory approval for AFM13, AFM24, AFM28 or other earlier programs, and if we choose not to grant any licenses to partners, we expect to incur

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significant commercialization expenses related to product manufacturing, sales, marketing and distribution, depending on where we choose to commercialize. We also continue to incur substantial costs associated with operating as a public company. Additional funds may not be available on a timely basis, on favorable terms, or at all, and such funds, if raised, may not be sufficient to enable us to continue to implement our long-term business strategy. If we are not able to raise capital when needed, we could be forced to delay, reduce or eliminate our product development programs or commercialization efforts.

        Based on our current operating and budget assumptions, we believe that our existing liquidity, will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements at least into the second half of 2023. We have based this estimate on assumptions that may prove to be incorrect, and we could use our capital resources sooner than we currently expect. Our future funding requirements will depend on many factors, including but not limited to:

    the scope, rate of progress, results and cost of our clinical trials, nonclinical testing, and other related activities;

    the cost of manufacturing clinical supplies, and establishing commercial supplies, of our product candidates and any products that we may develop;

    the number and characteristics of product candidates that we pursue;

    the cost, timing, and outcomes of regulatory approvals;

    the cost and timing of establishing sales, marketing, and distribution capabilities; and

    the terms and timing of any collaboration, licensing, and other arrangements that we have or may establish, including any required milestone and royalty payments thereunder.

        To address our financing needs, we may raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities. In such an event, the ownership interest of our shareholders will be diluted, and the terms of any such securities may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect the rights of holders of our common shares.

        For more information as to the risks associated with our future funding needs, see "Item 3. Key Information—D. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Need for Additional Capital—We will require substantial additional funding, which may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all, and, if not available, may require us to delay, scale back, or cease our product development programs or operations."

C.  Research and development, patents and licenses, etc.

        See "Item 4. Information on the Company—A. History and Development of the Company" and "Item 4. Information on the Company—B. Business Overview."

D.  Trend information

        See "Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects."

E.  Off-balance sheet arrangements

        As of the date of this Annual Report, we do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements other than operating leases as described under "Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—F. Tabular disclosure of contractual obligations" below.

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F.  Tabular disclosure of contractual obligations

        The table below sets forth our contractual obligations and commercial commitments as of December 31, 2020 that are expected to have an impact on liquidity and cash flow in future periods. In addition to license agreements with fixed payment obligations, we have entered into various collaboration and license agreements that may trigger milestone payments and royalty payments upon the achievement of certain milestones and net sales in the future. Because the achievement and timing of these milestones and net sales is not fixed or determinable, our commitments under these agreements have not been included in the table below.

 
  Payments Due by Period  
 
  Total   Less than
1 year
  Between
1 and 3
years
  Between
3 and 5
years
  More than
5 years
 
 
  (in € thousand)
 

Operating lease obligations

    1,144     568     453     123      

Fixed license payments

    65     65              

Total

    1,209     633     453     123      

    Operating lease obligations

        Operating lease obligations consist of payments pursuant to non-cancellable operating lease agreements relating to our lease of office and laboratory space. Approximately 60% of the space in Germany is under a revolving 24-month lease period, with a 12-month termination period. The lease could expire in 2023 if notice to terminate is provided by either party by February 2022. No such notice has been received to date. Approximately 30% of this facility was under a fixed term lease period until February 2021 and prolongations are currently in preparation. The remaining 10% is under a fixed term lease period until March 2025. We also lease office and laboratory space in the Czech Republic that is contracted until December 2025 with a period of notice of three months.

    Contingencies

        We have entered into various license agreements that contingently trigger on-off payments upon achievement of certain milestones and royalty payments in the future. Because the achievement and timing of these milestones and net sales is not fixed and determinable, our commitments under these agreements have not been included in the Contractual Obligations table above.

G.  Safe harbor

        See "Forward-Looking Statements."

ITEM 6.    DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

A.  Directors and senior management

        We have a two-tier board structure consisting of our supervisory board (raad van commissarissen) and a separate management board (raad van bestuur).

        Our supervisory board supervises the policies of the management board and the general course of the affairs of our business. The supervisory board gives advice to the management board and is guided by the interests of the business when performing its duties. The management board is in charge of managing the Company under the supervision of the supervisory board. The management board provides the supervisory board with such necessary information as the supervisory board requires to perform its duties.

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        The following table presents our supervisory directors. Bernhard R.M. Ehmer was re-appointed by the general meeting of shareholders on June 25, 2019. Ulrich M. Grau was appointed by the general meeting of shareholders on June 9, 2015, and his term was effective as of July 1, 2015 and he was re-appointed by the general meeting of shareholders on June 19, 2018. Mathieu Simon was appointed by the general meeting of shareholders on June 19, 2018. Thomas Hecht and Ferdinand Verdonck were appointed by the general meeting of shareholders on September 12, 2014, with effect from September 17, 2014 and they were re-appointed by the general meeting of shareholders on August 4, 2020. Harry Welten and Annalisa Jenkins were newly appointed by the general meeting on August 4, 2020. Thomas Hecht is the chairman of our supervisory board. The term of each of our supervisory directors will terminate on the date of the annual general meeting of shareholders in the year indicated below.

Name
  Age   Term  

Thomas Hecht

    69     2023  

Bernhard R.M. Ehmer

    66     2022  

Ulrich M. Grau

    72     2021  

Annalisa Jenkins

    55     2023  

Mathieu Simon

    64     2021  

Ferdinand Verdonck

    78     2023  

Harry Welten

    55     2023  

        The following is a brief summary of the business experience of our supervisory directors. Each director's tenure reflects their tenure on the board of our predecessor Affimed Therapeutics AG. Unless otherwise indicated, the current business address for each of our supervisory directors is Affimed N.V., c/o Affimed GmbH, Technologiepark, Im Neuenheimer Feld 582, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

        Thomas Hecht, Chairman.    Dr. Hecht has been the chairman of our supervisory board since 2014, and previously had been the chairman of the supervisory board of our German operating subsidiary since 2007. He is head of Hecht Healthcare Consulting in Küssnacht, Switzerland, a biopharmaceutical consulting company founded in 2002. Dr. Hecht also serves as Chairman of Aelix Therapeutics and of the Board of Orion Biotechnology and as member of the board of directors of Kuur Inc, USA. As from 3 July 2020, Dr. Hecht became a member of the board of directors of BioInvent, Sweden. Previously, Dr. Hecht served as a director of Humabs BioMed AG until August 2017 and he served as chairman of the board of directors of Cell Medica Ltd. Until the beginning of June 2020, he served as chairman of the board of directors of Vaximm AG, until March 2015, he served as chairman of the supervisory council of SuppreMol GmbH and until June 2016, of Delenex AG. Dr. Hecht was previously Vice President Marketing at Amgen Europe. A seasoned manager and industry professional, he held various positions of increasing responsibility in clinical development, medical affairs and marketing at Amgen between 1989 and 2002. Prior to joining the biopharmaceutical industry, he was certified in internal medicine and served as Co-Head of the Program for Bone Marrow Transplantation at the University of Freiburg, Germany.

        Bernhard R.M. Ehmer, Director.    Dr. Ehmer has been a member of our supervisory board since 2016. He also served as chairman of the board of directors at Symphogen A/S, Denmark until June 2020 and as chairman of the board of management of Biotest AG until April 2019. Prior to this, he worked for the Imclone Group, a wholly owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly, as president of Imclone Systems Corporation in the United States and as managing director in Germany. In 2007/2008 he was CEO of Fresenius Biotech, Germany and before this, Dr. Ehmer headed the Business Area Oncology of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt and served as head of Global Clinical Operations at Merck. Between 1986 and 1998 he held various functions at Boehringer Mannheim in Germany, Italy and

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Singapore. Dr. Ehmer holds a degree in medicine and worked in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Academic Teaching Hospital of the University of Heidelberg.

        Ulrich M. Grau, Director.    Dr. Grau has been a member of our supervisory board since July 2015. Prior to that, he served as an advisor to the management board of our German operating subsidiary beginning in May 2013. He has over 30 years of experience in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries including in general management, business development, corporate strategy and the development of new products and technologies. Dr. Grau was Chief Operating Officer at Micromet from 2011 to 2012. Between 2006 and 2010, Dr. Grau was a founder, President and CEO of Lux Biosciences, Inc., a clinical stage ophthalmic company.

        Previously, Dr. Grau served as President of Research and Development at BASF Pharma/ Knoll where he directed a global R&D organization with a development pipeline which included Humira. The majority of his career was at Aventis Pharma (now Sanofi), where he last held the position of Senior Vice President of global late stage development. Sanofi's product Lantus for the treatment of type 2 and type 1 diabetes is based on his inventions made during his early years as a scientist with Hoechst AG. Dr. Grau received his Ph.D. in chemistry and biochemistry from the University of Stuttgart and spent three years as a post-doctoral fellow at Purdue University in the field of protein crystallography.

        Annalisa Jenkins, Director.    Dr. Jenkins has been a member of Affimed's supervisory board since August 2020. Dr. Jenkins serves on the Board of Directors of AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. (NYSE American: AGE), Avrobio, Inc. (Nasdaq: AVRO), Oncimmune Holdings plc (LSE: ONC) and a number of privately held biotechnology and life science companies and is a committee member of the science board to the FDA, which advises FDA leadership on complex scientific and technical issues. Earlier, Dr. Jenkins served as the Chief Executive Officer of PlaqueTec Ltd. and Dimension Therapeutics. Previously, Dr. Jenkins held various senior management level positions at Merck Serono Pharmaceuticals, including Executive Vice President, head of global research and development. Prior to that, Dr. Jenkins pursued a 15-year career at Bristol-Myers Squibb with increasing responsibilities. Dr. Jenkins graduated with a degree in medicine from St. Bartholomew's Hospital in the University of London and subsequently trained in cardiovascular medicine in the UK National Health Service.

        Mathieu Simon, Director.    Dr. Simon has been a member of our supervisory board since 2018. He also serves as Senior Strategic Advisor at Messier Maris, an M&A advisory firm in the healthcare sector, located in New York, London and Paris. He is an independent director on the Board of Vaximm, headquartered in Basel, Switzerland as well as an independent director at Idorsia Pharmaceuticals (Switzerland), Lysogene (France) and Asarina (Sweden). Dr. Simon has served as Cellectis' Executive Vice-President since 2012 and as Chief Operating Officer since 2013. Dr. Simon also served as Chief Executive Officer of a former subsidiary of Cellectis. He has been instrumental to the development of Cellectis and its CAR Allogenic T-Cell platform. He also served as Chief Executive Officer of Ectycell in 2012. He served as Chairman of the Board of Celleartis AB until 2014 before its acquisition by Takara Bio. Prior to joining Cellectis, Dr. Simon was Managing Director, Head of Global Pharma at Pierre Fabre SA, the third largest French Pharma Company. Beginning in 1994, he served at Wyeth Pharmaceuticals in both general management roles (President Managing Director of Wyeth SMA) and senior corporate role in Philadelphia, United States (SVP / Head of International Marketing and Medical Affairs).

        Ferdinand Verdonck, Director.    Mr. Verdonck has been a member of our supervisory board since July 2014. He is a director of Laco Information Services. In recent years he was director of Groupe SNEF, director and member of the audit committee of J.P. Morgan European Investment Trust and director and chairman of the audit committee of biotechnology companies: uniQure N.V. in the Netherlands and Movetis and Galapagos in Belgium. He has previously served as chairman of

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Banco Urquijo and of Nasdaq Europe and as a director of Dictaphone Corporation. From 1992 to 2003, he was the managing director of Almanij NV, a financial services company which has since merged with KBC, and his responsibilities included company strategy, financial control, supervision of executive management and corporate governance, including board participation in publicly-traded and privately-held companies in many countries. Mr. Verdonck holds a law degree from KU Leuven and degrees in economics from KU Leuven and the University of Chicago.

        Harry Welten, Director.    Mr. Welten has been a member of our supervisory Board since August 2020. He serves as chairman and member of the board of directors of several biotechnology companies in Switzerland, Germany and the USA. Over the last 20 years, Mr. Welten served as Chief Financial Officer of both public as well as venture capital financed biotech companies. Mr. Welten has served in senior roles at UBS in Switzerland and New York for the first 15 years of his career. Mr. Welten has degrees in Banking, Finance and Economics as well as an MBA (honours) from Columbia University, NY, USA.

        The following table lists the members of our current management board:

Name
  Age   Position

Adi Hoess

    59   Chief Executive Officer

Wolfgang Fischer

    57   Chief Operating Officer

Andreas Harstrick

    59   Chief Medical Officer

Arndt Schottelius

    54   Chief Scientific Officer

Angus Smith

    38   Chief Financial Officer

        The following is a brief summary of the business experience of the members of our management board. Unless otherwise indicated, the current business addresses for the members of our management board is Affimed N.V., c/o Affimed GmbH, Technologiepark, Im Neuenheimer Feld 582, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

        Adi Hoess, Chief Executive Officer.    Dr. Hoess joined us in October 2010 as Chief Commercial Officer and since September 2011 has served as our Chief Executive Officer. He has more than 20 years of professional experience with an extensive background in general management, business development, product commercialization, fund raising and M&A. Prior to joining us, Dr. Hoess was Chief Commercial Officer at Jerini AG and Chief Executive Officer of Jenowis AG. At Jerini AG he was responsible for business development, marketing and sales and the market introduction of Firazyr. He also played a major role in the sale of Jerini to Shire plc. Dr. Hoess began his professional career in 1993 at MorphoSys. Dr. Hoess received his Ph.D. in chemistry and biochemistry from the University of Munich in 1991 and an M.D. from the Technical University of Munich in 1997.

        Wolfgang Fischer, Chief Operating Officer.    Dr. Fischer joined us in 2017 from Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals (Novartis Group). He has 20 years of experience in research and drug development with a focus on oncology, immunology and pharmacology. At Sandoz he managed the development and registration of Sandoz' biosimilar pipeline assets since 2012 and served as Global Head of Program and Project Management since 2014. Prior to joining Sandoz, he held various positions of increasing responsibility within the Novartis Group since 2003, including Medical Director Oncology for Novartis Pharma Switzerland AG as well as Regional Medical Director Hematology (Emerging Growth Markets), where he was responsible for the Hematology Medical Affairs program and supported the launch of several products in various countries. Dr. Fischer holds a Ph.D. in Cancer Research from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), Zurich, Switzerland. Thereafter, he completed postdoctoral fellowships at the Swiss Institute of Experimental Cancer Research, Lausanne, Switzerland and at the Scripps Research Institute, Department of Immunology,

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La Jolla, CA, USA, followed by a state doctorate (Habilitation) in Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Medical School of the University of Würzburg in Germany in 2003.

        Andreas Harstrick, M.D., Chief Medical Officer.    Dr. Harstrick agreed to serve as our Chief Medical Officer, starting in March 2020. He brings 30 years of extensive experience in cancer drug development, including the successful designing of clinical trials leading to approval of antibody drugs (Erbitux®; Cyramza®) and in-depth experience in setting-up and managing clinical oncology teams. Dr. Harstrick was Chief Medical Officer at Molecular Partners AG from 2015 to 2019, where he oversaw clinical activities, including expansion of the clinical team, and was a member of the Management Board. Between 2012 and 2014, Dr. Harstrick was Senior Vice President Medical Sciences at ImClone Systems, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Eli Lilly and Company, where he was also a member of the Lilly Oncology Program Review Board and the Lilly Oncology Business Unit Development Committee. Prior to joining ImClone in 2008, Dr. Harstrick was Senior Vice President Global Clinical Development Unit Oncology at Merck Serono until 2008. Dr. Harstrick is an oncologist by training. He spent his medical career at the University Hospital and Cancer Center Hannover, Germany; the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo NY; as well as the West German Cancer Center, Essen, Germany. He earned his MD at Medical School Hannover, Germany, and in 1999 he became Associate Professor for Internal Medicine, University of Essen, Germany.

        Arndt Schottelius, M.D. Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer.    Dr. Schottelius joined Affimed as Chief Scientific Officer in April 2020. He brings over 20 years of deep drug discovery and development experience in cancer and immunology with a strong track record in building therapeutic antibody pipelines and advancing drugs through development. Most recently, Dr. Schottelius was Executive Vice President and Head of Research & Development at Kymab Group Limited, where he was responsible for expanding the therapeutic antibody portfolio. Dr. Schottelius previously served as Chief Development Officer at MorphoSys AG, developing the portfolio of proprietary therapeutic antibody programs in cancer and immunology. He was instrumental in in-licensing tafasitamab (MOR208) and drove strategic direction and development of the MOR208 program into multiple phase 2 trials, which were the basis for a fast-to-market registration path. Prior to his role at MorphoSys, Dr. Schottelius was a Director and Medical Director, Immunology Development at Genentech Inc., where he directed early and late-stage development programs of therapeutic antibodies. Before joining Genentech, Dr. Schottelius held science and management positions in immunology research at Schering AG and Berlex Biosciences. Dr. Schottelius holds a PhD and MD degree from the Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg and is a lecturer at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich with a habilitation in Experimental Internal Medicine. He practiced medicine as a resident physician in gastroenterology at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin in Berlin, Germany, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Lineberger Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

        Angus Smith, Chief Financial Officer and Co-President Affimed Inc.    Mr. Smith joined Affimed in July 2020 as Chief Financial Officer. Previously, he was Chief Financial Officer at Rockwell Medical, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing and commercializing anemia therapies. He has broad biopharmaceutical industry experience including financial strategy, capital markets, business development and operations. Prior to Rockwell, Mr. Smith served as Senior Vice President, Chief Business Officer and Principal Financial Officer at Pernix Therapeutics, a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the acquisition, development and commercialization of prescription drugs. Mr. Smith began his career in healthcare investment banking, having most recently served as Director in the Healthcare Investment Banking Group at Cantor Fitzgerald in New York, NY. During his nearly decade-long investment banking tenure, he focused on strategic and financial advice for life science and healthcare companies. He has worked on a substantial number of transactions across the healthcare sector with an aggregate transaction value of more than

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$15 billion. Mr. Smith holds a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematical Economics from Colgate University in Hamilton, NY.

        The following is a brief summary of the business experience of certain other key employees.

        Denise Mueller, Chief Business Officer and Co-President Affimed Inc.    Ms. Mueller joined us in 2016 following a 17 year career at Wyeth and Pfizer Inc. She has held leadership roles in U.S. and global marketing including launch of new products and line extensions in-line and globally. Ms. Mueller has also held the position of Disease Area Lead for multiple therapeutic areas where she was responsible for disease area strategy, indication strategy for multiple assets, early commercial development and market shaping. In addition to broad and extensive commercial experience, Ms. Mueller led and managed two of Pfizer's largest alliances and was the business development lead for Pfizer's rare disease business unit. Prior to joining pharmaceuticals, Ms. Mueller worked in hospital management running Emergency Medicine, Critical Care, in-house Pediatrics and hospitalist programs. Ms. Mueller holds a B.A. in Mathematics from Virginia Polytechnic and State University.

B.  Compensation

Management services agreements

        Our managing directors have entered into management services agreements with us. The management services agreements of Adi Hoess became effective upon the consummation of our initial public offering. The management services agreement of Wolfgang Fischer became effective upon his appointment by the general meeting of shareholders on June 20, 2017. The management service agreements for Angus Smith, Arndt Schottellus and Andreas Harstrick became effective upon their appointment by the general meeting of shareholders on August 4, 2020. These agreements comprise the following elements: fixed salary, bonus payments, earmarked pension and social security payments and share based compensation components. In addition, these agreements provide for benefits upon a termination of service. Adi Hoess and Wolfgang Fischer were reappointed as managing directors by the general meeting of shareholders on August 4, 2020, which prolonged their respective management services agreements until 2023.

Long-term incentive plans

Equity Incentive Plan 2014

        In conjunction with the closing of our initial public offering, we established the Affimed N.V. Equity Incentive Plan 2014 ("the 2014 Plan") with the purpose of advancing the interests of our shareholders by enhancing our ability to attract, retain and motivate individuals who are expected to make important contributions to us. The maximum number of shares available for issuance under the 2014 Plan equals 7% of the total outstanding common shares on September 17, 2014, or approximately 1.7 million common shares. On January 1 of any calendar year thereafter (including January 1, 2021), an additional 5% of the total outstanding common shares on that date becomes available for issuance under the 2014 Plan. As of January 1, 2021, we had approximately 14.4 million common shares available for issuance, and approximately 8.0 million common shares subject to issuance under outstanding awards. The absolute number of shares available for issuance under the 2014 Plan will increase automatically upon the issuance of additional shares by the Company. The option exercise price for options under the 2014 Plan is the fair market value of a share as defined in the 2014 Plan on the relevant grant date. We are following home country rules relating to the re-pricing of stock options. Under applicable Dutch law, re-pricing is permissible, provided this falls within the framework set by the remuneration policy for the Management Board and the 2014 Plan.

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        Plan administration.    The 2014 Plan is administered by our compensation committee. Approval of the compensation committee is required for all grants of awards under the 2014 Plan. The compensation committee may delegate to the managing directors the authority to grant equity awards under the 2014 Plan to our employees.

        Eligibility.    Supervisory directors, managing directors and other employees and consultants of the Company are eligible for awards under the 2014 Plan.

        Awards.    Awards include options and restricted stock units.

        Vesting period.    Subject to any additional vesting conditions that may be specified in an individual grant agreement, and the accelerated vesting conditions below, the plan provides for three year vesting of stock options. One-third of the stock options granted to participants in connection with the start of their employment vest on the first anniversary of the grant date, with the remainder vesting in equal tranches at the end of each 3-month period thereafter. Stock options granted to other participants vest in equal tranches at the end of each 3-month period after the grant date over the course of the vesting period. The compensation committee will establish a vesting schedule for awards granted to supervisory directors as well as for any awards in the form of restricted stock units.

        Accelerated vesting.    Unless otherwise specified in an individual grant agreement, the 2014 Plan provides that upon a change of control of the Company (as defined in the 2014 Plan) all then outstanding equity awards will vest and become immediately exercisable. It also provides that upon a participant's termination of service due to (i) retirement (or after reaching the statutory retirement age), (ii) permanent disability rendering the relevant participant incapable of continuing employment or (iii) death, all outstanding equity awards that would have vested during a 12-month period following such termination of service will vest and become immediately exercisable. Otherwise at termination all unvested awards will be forfeited. If a participant experiences a termination of service without "cause" or for "good reason" (in each case, as defined in the 2014 Plan) within six months prior to a change of control, the Company will make a cash payment equivalent to the economic value that the participant would have realized in connection with the change of control upon the exercise and sale of the equity awards that such participant forfeited upon his or her termination of service. In connection with a change of control and subject to the approval of the supervisory board, the management board may amend the exercise provisions of the 2014 Plan.

Stock Option Equity Incentive Plan 2007

        Under the Stock Option Equity Incentive Plan 2007 (the "2007 SOP"), we granted options that were exercisable for preferred shares. In conjunction with the corporate reorganization in connection with our initial public offering, all outstanding awards granted under the 2007 SOP were converted into awards exercisable for common shares of Affimed N.V. and no additional grants were be made under the 2007 SOP. On December 31, 2019, the 2007 SOP terminated.

Compensation of Managing Directors and Supervisory Directors

        The compensation, including benefits in kind, accrued or paid to our managing directors and supervisory directors with respect to the year ended December 31, 2020, for services in all capacities is shown below on an individual basis. Further details for the compensation for our managing directors and supervisory directors are given in notes 19 and 25 to our consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ending December 31, 2020. As of December 31, 2020, we have no amounts set aside or accrued to provide pension, retirement or similar benefits to our managing directors and supervisory directors.

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Directors compensation 2020

Managing directors

(in € thousand)
  Adi
Hoess
  Wolfgang
Fischer
  Florian
Fischer
  Andreas
Harstrick
  Arndt
Schottelius
  Angus
Smith
  Total  

Periodically paid compensation

    493     419     90     256     306     183     1,747  

Bonuses

    237     155     60     101     116     76     745  

Total cash compensation

    730     574     150     357     422     259     2,492  

2014 Plan share-based payment expense

    625     324     76     159     179     291     1,654  

Total share-based payment expense

    625     324     76     159     179     291     1,654  

Supervisory directors

(in € thousand)
  Thomas
Hecht
  Bernhard
Ehmer
  Ulrich
Grau
  Annalisa
Jenkins
  Berndt
Modig
  Mathieu
Simon
  Ferdinand
Verdonck
  Harry
Welten
  Total  

Periodically paid compensation

    103     50     52     18     27     39     57     18     364  

Total cash compensation

    103     50     52     18     27     39     57     18     364  

2014 Plan share-based payment expense

    69     39     39     28     7     43     39     28     292  

Total share-based payment expense

    69     39     39     28     7     43     39     28     292  

Stock options granted under the Equity Incentive Plan 2014 Managing directors

Beneficiary
  Grant
date
  Number of
options
  Strike price
USD
  Expiration
date

Adi Hoess

  August 4, 2020     350,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Wolfgang Fischer

  August 4, 2020     190,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Andreas Harstrick

  March 1, 2020     200,000     2.36   March 1, 2030

Arndt Schottelius

  April 20, 2020     275,000     2.30   April 20, 2030

Angus Smith

  July 13, 2020     350,000     4.41   July 13, 2030

Total

        1,365,000          

Supervisory directors

Beneficiary
  Grant
date
  Number of
options
  Strike price
USD
  Expiration
date

Thomas Hecht

  August 4, 2020     35,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Bernhard Ehmer

  August 4, 2020     20,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Ulrich M. Grau

  August 4, 2020     20,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Annalisa Jenkins

  August 31, 2020     60,000     3.45   August 31, 2030

Mathieu Simon

  August 4, 2020     20,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Ferdinand Verdonck

  August 4, 2020     20,000     3.80   August 4, 2030

Harry Welten

  August 31, 2020     60,000     3.45   August 31, 2030

Total

        235,000          

        Dutch law provides that we must establish a policy in respect of the remuneration of our managing directors and supervisory directors. With respect to remuneration in the form of plans for

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shares or rights to shares (such as the Equity Incentive Plan 2014 mentioned above) the policy for managing directors must set out the maximum number of shares or rights to shares to be granted as well as the criteria for grants and for amending existing grants. The remuneration policies for the supervisory board and for the managing directors were adopted and approved by the general meeting of shareholders prior to the consummation of our initial public offering and have been amended subsequently, with the approval of the general meeting. The remuneration policy for the supervisory board established the compensation for our supervisory directors. The remuneration policy for the managing directors provides the supervisory board with a framework within which the supervisory board determines the remuneration of the managing directors.

        Our remuneration policy for our managing directors, which was last amended on August 4, 2020 with the approval of the general meeting, provides the supervisory board with the authority to enter into management services agreements with managing directors that provide for compensation consisting of base compensation, performance-related variable compensation, long-term equity incentive compensation (as detailed in the terms of the Equity Incentive Plan 2014 described above), pension and other benefits and severance pay and benefits. The remuneration policy for the managing directors provides that the annual cash bonus payable to managing directors may not exceed 100% of the annual base gross salary and will be based upon the achievement of set financial and operating goals for the period. The bonus payments may be increased in any given year by the supervisory board upon a proposal of the compensation committee based on any exceptional achievements of that managing director. In addition, the remuneration policy for managing directors allows for cash termination payments, which may not exceed 100% of the managing director's base salary, increased with the average variable compensation as referred to in (clause 4 of) the policy (the "STI Variable Compensation") over the last full three years, or if the term of office of the managing director is shorter than three years, the average received STI Variable Compensation over the shorter period. This policy also allows for additional compensation and benefits to our managing directors following a change of control.

        Our remuneration policy for the supervisory directors, which was last amended on August 4, 2020 with the approval of the general meeting, provides for payments and initial and annual equity awards. This is permissible under Dutch law, but constitutes a deviation from the DCGC. The remuneration policy for our supervisory directors establishes that each supervisory director will be entitled to an annual retainer of €20,000, provided that the chairman of the supervisory board will be entitled to an annual retainer of €75,000. In addition, the chairman of the audit committee is entitled to an additional annual retainer of €15,000 and the chairmen of standing committees established by the Supervisory Board are each entitled to annual retainers of €7,500. Supervisory directors will also be paid €3,000 for each in-person supervisory board meeting and €1,500 for each virtual/telephonic supervisory board meeting, provided that the duration of such virtual/telephonic supervisory board meeting exceeds 30 minutes. The members of each committee will be paid €1,500 for each in-person committee meeting and €750 for each virtual/telephonic committee meeting, provided that the duration of such virtual/telephonic committee meeting exceeds 30 minutes. In addition, we will grant any newly elected member of the supervisory board an initial award of stock options to purchase 60,000 common shares. These initial stock options will vest over a three-year period, with 1/3rd vesting on the first anniversary of the grant date, and the remainder vesting in equal installments at the end of each three-month period following the first anniversary of the date of the grant. In addition, the remuneration policy provides that annually the company will grant the chairman of the supervisory board options to purchase 45,000 common shares, and each other supervisory director stock options to purchase 30,000 common shares (each such award referred to as an "Annual Award"). The grant date for the Annual Awards shall be determined by the supervisory board and must (i) be in the first quarter of the financial year and (ii) compliant with Affimed's insider trading policy. Annual Awards will be made to the supervisory board members under the condition that they will remain in office after the annual general meeting of that year. If, in

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any given year, a supervisory board member will no longer be in office after the annual general meeting, he or she will not receive an annual award for that year. Annual Awards vest in four quarterly instalments and are fully vested on the first anniversary of the date of grant. Initial awards and annual awards will be granted automatically on the grant date or dates as set forth in (section 4.1 of) the policy and as determined by the supervisory board pursuant to and in accordance with (section 4.2 of) the policy based on the approval by the shareholders of the remuneration policy and without any further decisions or approvals by the supervisory board or the company. Supervisory directors are also entitled to be reimbursed for their reasonable expenses incurred in attending meetings of the supervisory board and its committees.

Insurance and Indemnification

        Our managing directors and supervisory directors have the benefit of indemnification provisions in our Articles of Association. These provisions give managing directors and supervisory directors the right, to the fullest extent permitted by law, to recover from us amounts, including but not limited to litigation expenses, and any damages they are ordered to pay, in relation to acts or omissions in the performance of their duties. However, there is generally no entitlement to indemnification for acts or omissions that amount to willful (opzettelijk), intentionally reckless (bewust roekeloos) or seriously culpable (ernstig verwijtbaar) conduct. In addition, upon consummation of our initial public offering, we entered into agreements with our managing directors and supervisory directors to indemnify them against expenses and liabilities to the fullest extent permitted by law. These agreements also provide, subject to certain exceptions, for indemnification for related expenses including, among others, attorneys' fees, judgments, penalties, fines and settlement amounts incurred by any of these individuals in any action or proceeding. In addition to such indemnification, we provide our managing directors and supervisory directors with directors' and officers' liability insurance.

        Insofar as indemnification of liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to supervisory directors, managing directors or persons controlling us pursuant to the foregoing provisions, we have been informed that, in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

C.  Board practices

Supervisory board

        Our supervisory board supervises the policies of the management board and the general course of the affairs of our business. The supervisory board gives advice to the management board and is guided by our interests and our business when performing its duties. The management board provides the supervisory board with such necessary information as is required to perform its duties. Supervisory directors are appointed by the general meeting of shareholders upon a binding nomination of the supervisory board for a term of up to four years.

        Our Articles of Association provide for a term of appointment of supervisory directors of up to four years. Furthermore, our Articles of Association state that a supervisory director may be reappointed, but that any supervisory director may be a supervisory director for no longer than twelve (12) years. Our supervisory directors are appointed for different terms as a result of which only approximately one third of our supervisory directors will be subject to election in any one year. Such an appointment has the effect of creating a staggered board and may deter a takeover attempt.

        The supervisory board meets as often as a supervisory board member deems necessary. In a meeting of the supervisory board, each supervisory director has a right to cast one vote. All resolutions by the supervisory board are adopted by an absolute majority of the votes cast. In the

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event the votes are equally divided, the chairman has the decisive vote. A supervisory director may grant another supervisory director a written proxy to represent him at the meeting.

        Our supervisory board can pass resolutions outside of meetings, provided that the resolution is adopted in writing and all supervisory directors have consented to adopting the resolution outside of a meeting.

        Our supervisory directors do not have a retirement age requirement under our Articles of Association.

Management board

        The management board is in charge of managing us under the supervision of the supervisory board. The number of managing directors is determined by our supervisory board. Managing directors are appointed by the general meeting of shareholders upon a binding nomination of the supervisory board.

        At least once per year the management board informs the supervisory board in writing of the main lines of our strategic policy, the general and financial risks and the management and control system.

        We have a strong centralized management board led by Adi Hoess, our Chief Executive Officer, who has a strong track record in the development and commercialization of new medicines. Our management team has extensive experience in the biopharmaceutical industry, and key members of our team have played an important role in the development and commercialization of approved drugs.

Supervisory Board Committees

Audit committee

        The audit committee, which consists of Ferdinand Verdonck (Chairman), Harry Welten and Bernhard Ehmer, assists the board in overseeing our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audits of our financial statements. In addition, the audit committee is directly responsible for the appointment, compensation, retention and oversight of the work of our independent registered public accounting firm. Our supervisory board has determined that Ferdinand Verdonck, Harry Welten and Bernhard Ehmer satisfy the "independence" requirements set forth in Rule 10A-3 under the Exchange Act. The supervisory board has determined that both Ferdinand Verdonck and Harry Welten qualify as an "audit committee financial expert," as such term is defined in the rules of the SEC.

        The audit committee is responsible for recommending the appointment of the independent auditor to the general meeting of shareholders; the appointment, compensation, retention and oversight of any accounting firm engaged for the purpose of preparing or issuing an audit report or performing other audit services; pre-approving the audit services and non-audit services to be provided by our independent auditor before the auditor is engaged to render such services; evaluating the independent auditor's qualifications, performance and independence, and presenting its conclusions to the full supervisory board on at least an annual basis and reviewing and discussing with the management board and the independent auditor our annual audited financial statements and quarterly financial statements prior to the filing of the respective annual and quarterly reports, among other things. The audit committee is also responsible for the oversight of the our information security management system, including the audit results of the information security certification and material information breaches and cybersecurity attacks.

        The audit committee meets as often as one or more members of the audit committee deem necessary, but in any event at least four times per year. The audit committee meets at least once

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per year with our independent accountant, without our management board being present. The audit committee reviews information security matters no less than once per year.

Compensation committee

        The compensation committee, which consists of Bernhard Ehmer (Chairman), Thomas Hecht and Harry Welten, assists the supervisory board inter alia in determining management board compensation. The committee recommends to the supervisory board for determination the compensation of each of our managing directors. Under SEC and Nasdaq rules, there are heightened independence standards for members of the compensation committee, including a prohibition against the receipt of any compensation from us other than standard supervisory director fees. As permitted by the listing requirements of Nasdaq, we have opted out of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(d) which requires that a compensation committee consist entirely of independent directors.

        The compensation committee is responsible for identifying, reviewing and approving corporate goals and objectives relevant to management board compensation; analyzing the possible outcomes of the variable remuneration components and how they may affect the remuneration of the managing directors; evaluating each managing director's performance in light of such goals and objectives and determining each managing director's compensation based on such evaluation and determining any long-term incentive component of each managing director's compensation in line with the remuneration policy and reviewing our management board compensation and benefits policies generally, among other things.

Nomination and corporate governance committee

        The nomination and corporate governance committee, which consists of Ulrich Grau (Chairman), Thomas Hecht, and Mathieu Simon, assists our supervisory board in identifying individuals qualified to become members of our supervisory board consistent with criteria established by our supervisory board and in developing our corporate governance principles. As permitted by the listing requirements of Nasdaq, we have opted out of Nasdaq Listing Rule 5605(e) which requires independent director oversight of director nominations.

Research and Development Committee

        The research and development committee, which consists of Annalisa Jenkins (Chairwoman), Ulrich Grau and Mathieu Simon, assists our supervisory board in aligning the R&D strategy of the Company with the overall Company strategy, to evaluate critical junctures of research and development activities and assess the competitive landscape and the impact on the Company's strategy and business.

D.  Employees

        As of March 29, 2021, our total headcount is 163 (153 full time equivalents), approximately 66% of whom have an advanced academic degree (Diploma/ Master, PhD, MD).

        None of our employees is subject to a collective bargaining agreement or represented by a trade or labor union.

        We consider our relations with our employees to be good.

E.  Share ownership

        See "Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions—A. Major shareholders."

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ITEM 7.    MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

A.  Major shareholders

        The following table presents information relating to the beneficial ownership of our common shares as of

        March 31, 2021, by:

    each person, or group of affiliated persons, known by us to own beneficially 5% or more of our outstanding common shares (as of the date of such stockholder's Schedule 13D or Schedule 13G filing for Affimed N.V. with the SEC);

    each of our managing directors and supervisory directors; and

    all managing directors and supervisory directors as a group.

        The number of common shares beneficially owned by each entity, person, managing director or supervisory director is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC, and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under such rules, beneficial ownership includes any common shares over which the individual has sole or shared voting power or investment power as well as any common shares that the individual has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 31, 2021 through the exercise of any option, warrant or other right. Except as otherwise indicated, and subject to applicable community property laws, the persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all common shares held by that person.

        The percentage of shares beneficially owned is computed on the basis of 118,953,080 of our common shares outstanding as of March 31, 2021. Common shares that a person has the right to acquire within 60 days of March 31, 2021 are deemed outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of the person holding such rights, but are not deemed outstanding for purposes of computing the percentage ownership of any other person, except with respect to the percentage ownership of all managing directors and supervisory directors as a group. Each common share confers the right on the holder to cast one vote at the general meeting of shareholders and no shareholder has different voting rights. Unless otherwise indicated below, the address for each

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beneficial owner listed is c/o Affimed N.V., c/o Affimed GmbH, Technologiepark, Im Neuenheimer Feld 582, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany.

 
  Shares beneficially owned  
Name and address of beneficial owner
  Number   Percent (%)  

Entities affiliated with New Enterprise Associates, Inc.(1)

    6,126,488     8.0  

Entities affiliated with Blackrock, Inc.(2)

    5,341,568     6.0  

Enitites affiliated with Steven A. Cohen(3)

    5,814,606     5.0  

Managing Directors and Supervisory Directors

             

Adi Hoess(4)

    1,901,318     1.6  

Wolfgang Fischer

    633,303     0.5  

Andreas Harstrick

    66,667     0.1  

Arndt Schottelius

    91,667     0.1  

Angus Smith

    0     0.0  

Thomas Hecht

    241,618     0.2  

Bernhard R.M. Ehmer

    110,000     0.1  

Ulrich M. Grau

    105,000     0.1  

Annalisa Jenkins

    0     0.0  

Mathieu Simon

    53,333     0.0  

Ferdinand Verdonck

    115,000     0.1  

Harry Welten

    0     0.0  

All managing directors and supervisory directors as a group (12 persons)

    3,317,906     2.8  

(1)
New Enterprise Associates 15, L.P. ("NEA 15") is the sole member of Growth Equity Opportunities Fund IV, LLC ("GEO"). NEA Partners 15, L.P. ("NEA Partners 15") is the sole general partner of NEA 15. NEA 15 GP, LLC ("NEA 15 LLC") is the sole general partner of NEA Partners 15. Peter J. Barris, Forest Baskett, Anthony A Florence, Jr., Krishna S. Joshua Makower, David M. Mott, Jon M. Sakoda, Scott D. Sandell, Peter W. Sonsini and Ravi Viswanathan are the managers of NEA 15 LLC. The address for GEO, NEA Partners 15 and NEA 15 LLC is New Enterprise Associates, 1954 Greenspring Drive, Suite 600, Timonium, MD 21093. This information is based on a statement filed on Schedule 13D with the SEC on November 18, 2019.

(2)
Represents shares beneficially owned by BlackRock, Inc and that were purchased by BlackRock Advisors, LLC, BlackRock Fund Advisors, BlackRock Asset Management Ireland Limited, BlackRock Institutional Trust Company, National Association, BlackRock Financial Management, Inc., BlackRock Investment Management, LLC, BlackRock Asset Management Canada Limited, BlackRock Investment Management (UK) Limited, BlackRock Japan Co., Ltd., all of which are subdiaries of BlackRock, Inc. The address for BlackRock, Inc. is BlackRock, Inc., 55 East 52nd Street New York, NY 10055. This information is based on a statement filed on Schedule 13G with the SEC on January 29, 2021.

(3)
Represents shares beneficially owned by Mr. Steven A. Cohen, Point72 Asset Management, L.P., Point72 Capital Advisors, Inc., Cubist Systematic Strategies, LLC and Point72 Hong Kong Limited. Mr. Steven A. Cohen controls each of Point72 Asset Management, L.P., Point72 Capital Advisors, Inc., Cubist Systematic Strategies, LLC, and Point72 Hong Kong Limited. Pursuant to an investment management agreement, Point72 Asset Management, L.P. maintains investment and voting power with respect to the securities held by certain investment funds it manages. Point72 Capital Advisors, Inc. is the general partner of Point72 Asset Management, L.P. Pursuant to an investment management agreement, Cubist Systematic Strategies, LLC maintains investment and voting power with respect to the securities held by certain investment funds it manages. Pursuant to an investment management agreement, Point72 Hong Kong Limited maintains investment and voting power with respect to the securities held by certain investment funds it manages. This information is based on a statement filed on Schedule 13G with the SEC on February 8, 2021.

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(4)
Indicates that the director is entitled to receive common shares in connection with the carve-out plan described in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2016 pursuant to which 7.78% of the common shares of the Company outstanding immediately prior to the initial public offering owned by pre-IPO existing shareholders will be transferred to the beneficiaries upon the conditions set forth therein.

Significant Changes in Ownership by Major Shareholders

        We have experienced significant changes in the percentage ownership held by major shareholders as a result of our initial public offering and subsequent offerings. Immediately prior to our initial public offering in September 2014, our principal shareholders were entities affiliated with Calibrium AG (formerly Aeris Capital AG, 32.2% ownership), entities affiliated with OrbiMed Advisors LLC (30.7% ownership), Novo Nordisk A/S (14.3% ownership), BioMedInvestI Ltd. (9.2% ownership) and entities affiliated with Life Sciences Partners (9.2% ownership).

        On September 17, 2014, we completed our initial public offering and listed our common shares on the Nasdaq Global Market. In the initial public offering, we sold 8,000,000 common shares. Certain of our pre-IPO investors purchased approximately $23.7 million of our common shares in the initial public offering.

        On May 12, 2015 we completed a public offering and sold 5,750,000 common shares to new investors.

        On October 14, 2015 we sold 3.3 million shares to SGR Sagittarius Holding AG, an existing shareholder affiliated with Calibrium AG (formerly Aeris Capital AG).

        In January and February 2017, we completed a public offering and sold 10,646,762 common shares primarily to new investors.

        On February 15, 2018, we completed a public offering and sold 13,225,000 common shares primarily to new investors.

        On November 7, 2019, we completed a public offering and issued 13,800,000 common shares primarily to new investors.

        During 2020, we entered into two 'at-the-market' share sale agreements which resulted in the sale of in total approximately 20.4 million common shares primarily to new investors.

        On January 15, 2021, we completed a public offering and issued 19,166,667 common shares primarily to new investors.

Holders

        As of April 15, 2021, we had approximately six shareholders of record of our common shares; two of those shareholders of record are in the United States and hold a total of approximately 118.1 million common shares in the aggregate, or approximately 99% of our common shares. One of the U.S. shareholders of record is Cede and Company, a specialist United States financial institution that processes transfers of stock certificates on behalf of the Depository Trust Company, or DTC. Cede and Company therefore is the technical shareholder of record for nearly all of our issued shares held by DTC participants, as our shareholders do not themselves hold direct property rights in our common shares, but rather have contractual rights in such shares that are part of a chain of contractual rights involving Cede and Company.

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B.  Related party transactions

        The following is a description of related party transactions we have entered into since January 1, 2020 with any of our members of our supervisory board or management board and the holders of more than 5% of our common shares.

Agreements with Supervisory Directors

        Before the appointment as Supervisory Director, Harry Welten provided consulting services to us and received related payments of €196,000 in 2020.

Indemnification Agreements

        We have entered into indemnification agreements with our managing directors and supervisory directors. The indemnification agreements and our Articles of Association require us to indemnify our managing directors and supervisory directors to the fullest extent permitted by law. See "Item 6B. Compensation—Insurance and Indemnification" for a description of these indemnification agreements.

Other Agreements with Directors

        See "Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees—B. Compensation" for a description of other agreements with our managing directors and supervisory directors.

C.  Interests of Experts and Counsel

        Not applicable.

ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL INFORMATION

A.  Consolidated statements and other financial information Financial statements

        See "Item 18. Financial Statements," which contains our financial statements prepared in accordance with IFRS.

Legal Proceedings

        From time to time we are involved in legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business. We believe that the outcome of these proceedings, if determined adversely, will not have a material adverse effect on our financial position. During the period covered by the audited and approved financial statements contained herein, we have not been a party to or paid any damages in connection with litigation that has had a material adverse effect on our financial position. Any future litigation may result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and employer. No assurance can be given that future litigation will not have a material adverse effect on our financial position. For an additional discussion of certain risks associated with legal proceedings, see "Item 3. Key Information—D. Risk factors."

Dividends and Dividend Policy

        We have not declared cash dividends on our common shares in the years 2018, 2019 or 2020. We currently expect to retain future earnings, if any, to finance the operation and expansion of our business, and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future determination related to our dividend policy will be made at the discretion of our supervisory board.

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B.  Significant changes

        A discussion of the significant changes in our business can be found under "Item 4. Information on the Company—A. History and development of the company."

ITEM 9.    THE OFFER AND LISTING

A.  Offering and listing details

        Not applicable.

B.  Plan of distribution

        Not applicable.

C.  Markets

        Our common shares began trading on the Nasdaq Global Market on September 12, 2014 under the symbol AFMD.

D.  Selling shareholders

        Not applicable.

E.  Dilution

        Not applicable.

F.  Expenses of the issue

        Not applicable.

ITEM 10.    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

A.  Share capital

        Not applicable.

B.  Memorandum and articles of association

        Our shareholders adopted the Articles of Association filed as Exhibit 3.1 to our registration statement on Form F-1 (file no. 333-197097) with the SEC on September 17, 2014, and have subsequently adopted amendments to the Articles of Association, most recently on August 4, 2020.

C.  Material contracts

        Except as otherwise disclosed in this Annual Report on Form 20-F (including the Exhibits), we are not currently, and have not been in the last two years, party to any material contract, other than contracts entered into in the ordinary course of business.

D.  Exchange controls

        Cash dividends payable on our common shares and cash interest payments to holders of our debt securities may be remitted from the Netherlands to non-residents without legal restrictions imposed by the laws of the Netherlands, except that (i) such payments must be reported, if requested, to the Dutch Central Bank for statistical purposes only and (ii) the transfer of funds to jurisdictions subject to general economic sanctions adopted in connection with policies of the United

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Nations, European Commission or similar measures imposed directly by the Government of the Netherlands may be restricted.

E.  Taxation

        The following summary contains a description of material German, Dutch and U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of common shares, but it does not purport to be a comprehensive description of all the tax considerations that may be relevant to a decision to purchase common shares. The summary is based upon the tax laws of Germany, the Netherlands and the United States and regulations thereunder as of the date hereof, which are subject to change.

German Tax Considerations

        The following discussion is a summary of the material German tax considerations which—as the Company has its place of management in Germany and is therefore tax resident in Germany—relate to the purchase, ownership and disposition of our common shares both by a shareholder (an individual, a partnership or corporation) that has a tax domicile in Germany (that is, whose place of residence, habitual abode, registered office or place of management is in Germany) and by a shareholder without a tax domicile in Germany. This discussion does not cover the treatment of certain special companies such as those engaged in the financial and insurance sectors and pension funds. The information is not exhaustive and does not constitute a definitive explanation of all possible aspects of taxation that could be relevant for shareholders. The information is based on the tax law in force in Germany as of the date hereof (and its interpretation by administrative directives and courts) as well as typical provisions of double taxation treaties that Germany has concluded with other countries.

        Tax law can change—sometimes retrospectively. Moreover, it cannot be ruled out that the German tax authorities or courts may consider an alternative assessment to be correct that differs from the one described in this section.

        This section cannot replace tailored tax advice to individual shareholders. They are therefore advised to consult their tax advisors regarding the tax implications of the acquisition, holding or transfer of shares and regarding the procedures to be followed to achieve a possible reimbursement of German withholding tax. Only such advisors are in a position to take the specific tax-relevant circumstances of individual shareholders into due account.

Income Tax Implications of the Purchase, Holding and Disposal of Shares

        In terms of the taxation of shareholders of the Company, a distinction must be made between taxation in connection with the holding of shares ("Taxation of Dividends"), taxation in connection with the sale of shares ("Taxation of Capital Gains") and taxation in connection with the mortis causa or inter vivos (munificent) transfer of shares ("Inheritance and Gift Tax").

Taxation of Dividends

    Withholding tax

        As a general rule, the dividends distributed to the shareholder are subject to a withholding tax (Kapitalertragsteuer) of 25% and a solidarity surcharge of 5.5% thereon (i.e., 26.375% in total plus church tax, if applicable). The withholding tax is withheld and discharged for the account of the shareholders by the Company. Dividend payments that are funded from the Company's contribution account for tax purposes (steuerliches Einlagekonto ; § 27 Körperschaftsteuergesetz, German

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Corporation Income Tax Act) are generally not taxable in Germany and are not subject to withholding tax.

        In general, the withholding tax must be withheld regardless of whether and to which extent the dividend is exempt from tax at the level of the shareholder and whether the shareholder is domiciled in Germany or abroad.

        However, withholding tax on dividends distributed to a company domiciled in another EU Member State within the meaning of § 43b Einkommensteuergesetz, German Income Tax Act, in connection with Article 2 of Council Directive 2011/96/EU of November 30, 2011 on the common system of taxation applicable in the case of parent companies and subsidiaries of different member states, as amended (the "Parent-Subsidiary Directive") may be refunded or exempted upon application and subject to further conditions. This also applies to dividends distributed to a permanent establishment of such a parent company resident in another Member State of the European Union or to a parent company that is subject to unlimited tax liability in Germany, provided that the participation in the Company actually forms part of such permanent establishment's business assets. As further requirements for the refund or exemption of withholding tax under the Parent-Subsidiary Directive, the shareholder needs to hold—for corporate income tax purposes—at least a 10% direct stake in the company's registered capital for an uninterrupted period of at least 12 months and to file a respective application with the German Federal Central Tax Office (Bundeszentralamt für Steuern, Hauptdienstsitz Bonn-Beuel, An der Küppe 1, 53225 Bonn) using an official form. With the annual tax bill in 2019 the German legislature raised the threshold for the aforementioned exemption from trade tax for dividends for corporations within the meaning of Article 2 of the Parent-Subsidiary Directive to 15% for assessment periods beginning January 1, 2020.

        If, in the case of such a holding by a company domiciled in another EU member state within the meaning of Article 2 of the Parent-Subsidiary Directive of at least 10%, shares held in collective custody (girosammelverwahrt) by the central securities depository (Wertpapiersammelbank) are treated as so-called "abgesetzte Bestände" (stock being held separately), the German tax authorities will not object when the main paying agent (Hauptzahlstelle) of the Company upon presentation of an exemption certificate (Freistellungsbescheinigung) and of a proof that this stock has been held separately, disburses the dividend without deducting withholding tax. An exemption certificate can be granted upon application (using official application forms) with the German Federal Central Tax Office (Bundeszentralamt für Steuern).

        With respect to distributions made to other shareholders without a tax domicile in Germany, the withholding tax rate can be reduced in accordance with a double taxation treaty if Germany has entered into a double taxation treaty with the shareholder's state of residence and if the shares neither form part of the assets of a permanent establishment or a fixed place of business in Germany, nor form part of business assets for which a permanent representative in Germany has been appointed. Pursuant to most German tax treaties, including the income tax treaty between Germany and the United States, the German withholding tax rate is reduced to 15% (or, in certain cases, depending on the size of the shareholding, to a lower rate) with respect to distributions received by shareholders eligible for treaty benefits. The withholding tax reduction is generally granted by the German Federal Central Tax Office (Bundeszentralamt für Steuern) upon application in such a manner that the difference between the total amount withheld, including the solidarity surcharge, and the reduced withholding tax actually owed under the relevant double taxation treaty is refunded by the German Federal Central Tax Office.

        Forms for the reimbursement and exemption from the withholding at source procedure are available at the German Federal Central Tax Office (http://www.bzst.bund.de) as well as at German embassies and consulates.

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        If dividends are distributed to corporations subject to limited tax liability, i.e., corporations with no registered office or place of management in Germany and if the shares neither belong to the assets of a permanent establishment or fixed place of business in Germany nor form part of business assets for which a permanent representative in Germany has been appointed, two-fifths of the tax withheld at the source can generally be refunded even if the prerequisites for a refund under the Parent-Subsidiary Directive or the relevant double taxation treaty are not fulfilled. The relevant application forms are available at the German Federal Central Tax Office (at the address specified above).

        The exemption from withholding tax under the Parent-Subsidiary Directive as well as the aforementioned possibilities for a refund of withholding tax depend on certain other conditions being met (particularly the fulfillment of so-called substance requirements—Substanzerfordernisse).

        For shareholders resident in Germany (i.e., shareholders whose place of residence or usual place of abode or, in case of corporations, its statutory seat or place of management, is situated in Germany) holding their shares as business assets as well as for shareholders residing outside Germany (foreign shareholders) holding their shares in a permanent establishment or a fixed base in Germany, or as assets for which a permanent representative has been appointed in Germany, the tax withheld is credited against the shareholders' personal income tax or corporate income tax. Such crediting of withholding tax requires a certificate within the meaning of Section 45a (2) Income Tax Act.

        Any tax withheld in excess of the shareholders' personal tax is refunded. The same principles apply to the solidarity surcharge.

        For taxpayers who are subject to church tax, an automatic procedure for deducting church tax applies unless the shareholder has filed a blocking notice (Sperrvermerk) with the German Federal Central Tax Office. The church tax payable will be withheld together with the withholding tax. The taxpayer may refuse (block) the automatic query to the Federal Central Tax Office, which will then force an assessment by the taxpayer and the shareholder will be obliged to declare the dividends in his income tax return. The respective forms may be obtained from the German Federal Central Tax Office (Bundeszentralamt für Steuern), An der Kuppe 1, 53225 Bonn, Germany (www.bzst.bund.de). If the church tax is withheld together with the withholding tax, the withholding tax will be reduced by 26.375% (including the solidarity surcharge) of the church tax levied on the withholding tax.

        In case the shares are entrusted to a central securities depository (Wertpapiersammelbank) outside of Germany for custody as it is the case with the shares in the Company, the aforementioned withholding tax relief in accordance with applicable double taxation treaties as well as the credit of withholding tax described for shares held as private and as business assets is, pursuant to a special rule on the restriction of withholding tax credit, subject to the following three cumulative prerequisites: (i) the relevant shareholder must qualify as beneficial owner of the shares in the Company for a minimum holding period of 45 consecutive days occurring within a period of 45 days prior and 45 days after the due date of the dividends, (ii) the shareholder has to bear at least 70% of the risk in value change related to the shares in the Company during the minimum holding period without being directly or indirectly hedged and (iii) the shareholder is not required to fully or largely, directly or indirectly, transfer the dividends to third parties. If these requirements are not met, then for a shareholder not being tax-resident in Germany who applied for a full or partial refund of the withholding tax pursuant to a double taxation treaty, no refund is available. This restriction generally does only apply, if (i) the tax underlying the refund application is below a tax rate of 15% based on the gross amount of the dividends or capital gains and (ii) the shareholder does not directly own 10% or more in the shares of the Company and is subject to income taxes in its state of residence, without being tax-exempt. In addition to the aforementioned restrictions, in particular, pursuant to a decree published by the German Federal Ministry of Finance dated July 17,

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2017 (BMF, Schreiben vom 17.7.2017—IV C 1—S 2252/15/10030:05, DOK 2017/0614356), as amended, the withholding tax credit may also be denied as an anti-abuse measure.

    Taxation of dividends of shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany Shares held as non-business assets

        Dividends distributed to shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany whose shares are held as non-business assets form part of their taxable capital investment income, which is subject to a flat tax at a rate of 25% plus solidarity surcharge of 5.5% thereon (i.e., 26.375% in total plus church tax, if applicable). The income tax owed for this dividend income is in general discharged by the withholding tax levied by the Company (flat tax—Abgeltungsteuer). Income-related expenses cannot be deducted from the capital investment income, except for an annual lump-sum deduction (Sparer-Pauschbetrag) of €801 (€1,602 for married couples filing jointly). However, the shareholder may request that his capital investment income (including dividends) along with his other taxable income is taxed at his individual progressive income tax rate (instead of the flat tax on capital investment income) if this results in a lower tax burden. In this case the withholding tax will be credited against the individual progressive income tax and any excess amount will be refunded. In this case as well income-related expenses cannot be deducted from the capital investment income, except for the aforementioned annual lump-sum deduction.

        Exceptions from the flat tax apply upon application for shareholders who have a shareholding of at least 25% in the Company and for shareholders who have a shareholding of at least 1% in the Company and can take significant entrepreneurial influence on the Company's economic activity by a professional activity for the Company. In this case 60% of the dividend income is taxed at the individual progressive income tax rate and 60% of the expenses in relation to the shareholding are deductible.

    Shares held as business assets

        Dividends from shares held as business assets by a shareholder with a tax domicile in Germany are not subject to the flat tax. The taxation depends on whether the shareholder is a corporation, a sole proprietor or a partnership (co-entrepreneurship). The withholding tax (including the solidarity surcharge thereon and church tax, if applicable) withheld and paid by the Company will be credited against the shareholder's income tax or corporate income tax liability (including the solidarity surcharge thereon and church tax, if applicable) or refunded in the amount of any excess.

    Corporations

        If the shareholder is a corporation with a tax domicile in Germany, the dividends are in general effectively 95% exempt from corporate income tax and the solidarity surcharge. Five percent of the dividends are treated as non-deductible business expenses and are therefore subject to corporate income tax (plus the solidarity surcharge thereon) at a total tax rate of 15.825%. In other respects, business expenses actually incurred in direct relation to the dividends may be deducted. However, dividends are not exempt from corporate income tax (including solidarity surcharge thereon), if the shareholder only held (or holds) a direct participation of less than 10% in the share capital of the distributing corporation at the beginning of the calendar year (hereinafter in all cases, a "Portfolio Participation" (Streubesitzbeteiligung)). Participations of at least 10% acquired during a calendar year are deemed to have been acquired at the beginning of the calendar year. Participations which a corporate shareholder holds through a partnership (including those that are co-entrepreneurships (Mitunternehmerschaften)) are attributable to the shareholder only on a pro rata basis at the ratio of the interest share of the shareholder in the assets of the relevant partnership. Shareholders affected by the rules for the taxation of dividends from Portfolio Participations are recommended to discuss the potential consequences with their tax advisors.

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        Dividends (after deducting business expenses economically related to the dividends) are subject to trade tax in the full amount, unless the participation amounts to at least 15% at the beginning of the relevant assessment period (trade tax participation exemption privilege). In this latter case, the dividends are not subject to trade tax; however, trade tax is levied on amounts considered to be non-deductible business expenses (amounting to 5% of the dividend). Trade tax ranges from 7% to approximately 18% depending on the municipal trade tax multiplier applied by the relevant municipal authority.

    Sole proprietors

        If the shares are held as business assets by a sole proprietor with a tax domicile in Germany, only 60% of the dividends are subject to progressive income tax (plus the solidarity surcharge thereon) at a total tax rate of up to approximately 47.5% (plus church tax, if applicable), under the so-called partial income method (Teileinkünfteverfahren). Only 60% of the business expenses economically related to the dividends are tax-deductible. If the shares belong to a domestic permanent establishment in Germany of a business operation of the shareholder, the dividend income (after deducting business expenses economically related thereto) is fully subject to trade tax, unless the shareholder holds at least 15% of the share capital of the Company at the beginning of the relevant assessment period (trade tax participation exemption privilege). In this latter case the net amount of dividends, i.e., after deducting directly related expenses, is exempt from trade tax. As a rule, trade tax can be credited against the shareholder's personal income tax, either in full or in part, by means of a lump-sum tax credit method—depending on the level of the municipal trade tax multiplier and certain individual tax-relevant circumstances of the taxpayer.

    Partnerships

        If the shareholder is a genuine business partnership or a deemed business partnership (co-entrepreneurship) with a permanent establishment in Germany, the income tax or corporate income tax is not levied at the level of the partnership but at the level of the respective partner. The taxation of every partner depends on whether the partner is a corporation or an individual. If the partner is a corporation, the dividends contained in the profit share of the partner will be taxed in accordance with the rules applicable for corporations (see "Corporations "above). If the partner is an individual, the taxation follows the rules described for sole proprietors, (see "Sole proprietors "above). Upon application and subject to further conditions, an individual as a partner can have his personal income tax rate reduced for earnings retained at the level of the partnership.

        In addition, the dividends are generally subject to trade tax in the full amount at the partnership level if the shares are attributed to a German permanent establishment of the partnership. If a partner of the partnership is an individual, the portion of the trade tax paid by the partnership pertaining to his profit share will generally be credited, either in full or in part, against his personal income tax by means of a lump-sum method—depending on the level of the municipal trade tax multiplier and certain individual tax-relevant circumstances of the taxpayer. Due to a lack of case law and administrative guidance, it is currently unclear how the rules for the taxation of dividends from Portfolio Participations (see "Corporations "above) might impact the trade tax treatment at the level of the partnership. Shareholders are strongly recommended to consult their tax advisors. Under a literal reading of the law, if the partnership qualifies for the trade tax exemption privilege at the beginning of the relevant assessment period, the dividends should generally not be subject to trade tax. However, in this case, trade tax should be levied on 5% of the dividends to the extent they are attributable to the profit share of such corporate partners to whom at least 10% of the shares in the Company are attributable on a look-through basis, since such portion of the dividends should be deemed to be non-deductible business expenses. The remaining portion of the dividend income attributable to other than such specific corporate partners (which includes individual partners and

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should, under a literal reading of the law, also include corporate partners to whom, on a look-through basis, only Portfolio Participations are attributable) should (after the deduction of business expenses economically related thereto) not be subject to trade tax. Due to a lack of case law and administrative guidance, it is currently unclear how the rules for the taxation of dividends from Portfolio Participations (see "Corporations "above) might impact the trade tax treatment at the level of the partnership. Shareholders are strongly recommended to consult their tax advisers.

        The German government issued a new draft bill on the modernization of the German corporate income tax law on March 24, 2021. Amongst others, according to this draft bill, partnerships may opt for taxation as corporations under certain conditions. Shareholders are advised to monitor the further legislative process and to consult their individual tax advisor in this respect.

    Taxation of dividends of shareholders without a tax domicile in Germany

        Shareholders without a tax domicile in Germany whose shares are attributable to a German permanent establishment or fixed place of business or are part of business assets for which a permanent representative in Germany has been appointed, are also subject to tax in Germany on their dividend income. In this respect the provisions outlined above for shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany whose shares are held as business assets apply accordingly ("—Taxation of dividends of shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany—Shares held as business assets "). The withholding tax (including the solidarity surcharge thereon) withheld and passed on will be credited against the income or corporate income tax liability or refunded in the amount of any excess.

        In all other cases, any German limited tax liability on dividends is discharged by withholding tax imposed by the Company. Withholding tax is only reimbursed in the cases and to the extent described above under "—Withholding tax ".

Taxation of Capital Gains

    Taxation of capital gains of shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany

    Shares held as non-business assets

        Gains from the disposal of shares acquired after December 31, 2008 by a shareholder with a tax domicile in Germany and held as non-business assets are generally—regardless of the holding period—subject to a flat tax on capital investment income at a rate of 25% (plus the solidarity surcharge of 5.5% thereon, i.e., 26.375% in total plus church tax, if applicable).

        The taxable capital gain is computed as the difference between (a) the sale proceeds and (b) the acquisition costs of the shares and the expenses related directly and economically to the disposal.

        Only an annual lump-sum deduction of € 801 (€1,602 for married couples filing jointly) may be deducted from the entire capital investments income. It is not possible to deduct income-related expenses in connection with capital gains, except for the expenses directly related in substance to the disposal which can be deducted when calculating the capital gains. Losses from disposals of shares may only be offset against capital gains from the disposal of shares.

        If the disposal of the shares is executed by a domestic credit institution, or domestic financial services institution (inländisches Kredit-oder Finanzdienstleistungsinstitut) (including domestic branches of foreign credit and financial services institutions), domestic securities trading company (inländisches Wertpapierhandelsunternehmen) or a domestic securities trading bank (inländische Wertpapierhandelsbank), and such office pays out or credits the capital gains (a "Domestic Paying Agent"), the tax on the capital gains will in general be discharged for the account of the seller by the Domestic Paying Agent imposing the withholding tax on investment income at the rate of 26.375% (including the solidarity surcharge thereon plus church tax, if applicable) on the capital gain.

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        However, the shareholder can apply for his total capital investment income together with his other taxable income to be subject to his progressive income tax rate, as opposed to the flat tax on investment income, if this results in a lower tax liability. In this case the withholding tax is credited against the individual progressive income tax and any resulting excess amount will be refunded. In this case as well income-related expenses cannot be deducted from the capital investment income, except for the aforementioned annual lump-sum deduction. Further, the limitations on offsetting losses are also applicable under the income tax assessment.

        If the withholding tax or, if applicable, the church tax on capital gains, is not withheld by a Domestic Paying Agent, the shareholder is required to declare the capital gains in his income tax return. The income tax and any applicable church tax on the capital gains will then be collected by way of assessment.

        Regardless of the holding period and the time of acquisition, gains from the disposal of shares are not subject to the flat tax but to individual progressive income tax if a shareholder domiciled in Germany, or, in the event of a munificent transfer, their legal predecessor, or, if the shares have been munificently transferred several times in succession, one of his legal predecessors at any point during the five years preceding the disposal directly or indirectly held at least 1% of the share capital of the Company (a "Qualified Holding"). In this case the partial income method applies to gains from the disposal of shares, which means that only 60% of the capital gains are subject to tax and only 60% of the losses on the disposal and expenses economically related thereto are tax deductible. Even though withholding tax has to be withheld by a Domestic Paying Agent in the case of a Qualified Holding, this does not discharge the tax liability of the shareholder. Consequently, a shareholder must declare his capital gains in his income tax return. The withholding tax (including the solidarity surcharge thereon and church tax, if applicable) levied and paid will be credited against the shareholder's income tax liability as assessed (including the solidarity surcharge thereon and any church tax, if applicable) or refunded in the amount of any excess.

    Shares held as business assets

        Gains from the sale of shares held as business assets of a shareholder with a tax domicile in Germany are not subject to the flat tax. The taxation of the capital gains depends on whether the shareholder is a corporation, a sole proprietor or a partnership (co-entrepreneurship).

    Corporations

        If the shareholder is a corporation with a tax domicile in Germany, the gains from the disposal of shares are in general effectively 95% exempt from corporate income tax (including the solidarity surcharge thereon) and trade tax, regardless of the size of the participation and the holding period, and 5% of the gains are treated as non-deductible business expenses and are therefore subject to corporate income tax (plus the solidarity surcharge thereon) at a rate of 15.825% and trade tax (at a rate depending on the municipal trade tax multiplier applied by the municipal authority, generally between 7% and approximately 18%). As a rule, capital losses and other profit reductions in connection with shares (e.g., from a write-down) cannot be deducted for tax purposes. Currently, there are no specific rules for the taxation of gains arising from the disposal of Portfolio Participations.

    Sole proprietors

        If the shares are held as business assets by a sole proprietor with a tax domicile in Germany, only 60% of the gains from the disposal of the shares are subject to progressive income tax (plus the solidarity surcharge thereon) at a total tax rate of up to approximately 47.5%, and, if applicable, church tax (partial-income method). Only 60% of the losses on the disposal and expenses

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economically related thereto are tax deductible. If the shares belong to a German permanent establishment of a business operation of the sole proprietor, 60% of the gains of the disposal of the shares are, in addition, subject to trade tax.

        Trade tax can be credited against the shareholder's personal income tax liability, either in full or in part, by means of a lump-sum tax credit method—depending on the level of the municipal trade tax multiplier and certain individual tax-relevant circumstances of the taxpayer.

    Partnerships

        If the shareholder is a genuine business partnership or a deemed business partnership (co-entrepreneurship) with a permanent establishment in Germany, the income or corporate income tax is not levied at the level of the partnership but at the level of the respective partner. The taxation depends on whether the partner is a corporation or an individual. If the partner is a corporation, the capital gains from the shares as contained in the profit share of the partner will be taxed in accordance with the rules applicable to corporations (see "Corporations "above). For capital gains in the profit share of a partner that is an individual, the principles outlined above for sole proprietors apply accordingly (partial-income method, see above under "Sole proprietors "). Upon application and subject to further conditions, a partner that is an individual can obtain a reduction of his personal income tax rate for earnings retained at the level of the partnership.

        In addition, capital gains from the shares are subject to trade tax at the level of the partnership if the shares are attributed to a domestic permanent establishment of a business operation of the partnership generally, (i) at 60% as far as they are attributable to the profit share of an individual partner, and (ii) currently, at 5% as far as they are attributable to the profit share of a corporate partner. Capital losses and other profit reductions in connection with the shares are currently not deductible for trade tax purposes if they are attributable to the profit share of a corporation; however, 60% of the capital losses are deductible, subject to general limitations, to the extent such losses are attributable to the profit share of an individual.

        If the partner is an individual, the portion of the trade tax paid by the partnership attributable to his profit share will generally be credited, either in full or in part, against his personal income tax by means of a lump-sum method—depending on the level of the municipal trade tax multiplier and certain individual tax-relevant circumstances of the taxpayer.

        The German government issued a new draft bill on the modernization of the German corporate income tax law on March 24, 2021. Amongst others, according to this draft bill, partnerships may opt for taxation as corporations under certain conditions. Shareholders are advised to monitor the further legislative process and to consult their individual tax advisor in this respect.

    Withholding tax

        In case of a Domestic Paying Agent, the capital gains from shares held as business assets are in general subject to withholding tax in the same way as shares held as non-business assets by a shareholder (see "—Taxation of capital gains of shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany—Shares held as non-business assets "). However, the Domestic Paying Agent will not levy the withholding tax, provided that (i) the shareholder is a corporation, association of persons or estate with a tax domicile in Germany, or (ii) the shares belong to the domestic business assets of a shareholder, and the shareholder declares so to the Domestic Paying Agent using the designated official form and certain other requirements are met. If withholding tax is imposed by a Domestic Paying Agent, the withholding tax (including the solidarity surcharge thereon and church tax, if applicable) imposed and discharged will be credited against the income tax or corporate income tax liability (including the solidarity surcharge thereon and church tax, if applicable) or will be refunded in the amount of any excess.

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    Taxation of capital gains of shareholders without a tax domicile in Germany

        Capital gains derived by shareholders not tax resident in Germany are only subject to German tax if the shareholder has a Qualified Holding in the Company or the shares belong to a domestic permanent establishment or fixed place of business or are part of business assets for which a permanent representative in Germany has been appointed.

        In case of a Qualified Holding (as defined in "Taxation of capital gains of shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany—Shares held as non-business assets "), only 60% of the gains from the disposal of the shares are subject to progressive income tax plus the solidarity surcharge thereon (partial-income method), if the shareholder is a private individual. If the shareholder is a corporation and the shares do not belong to a domestic permanent establishment or fixed place of business and are not part of business assets for which a permanent representative in Germany has been appointed, the gains from the disposal of the shares should, according to a judgement of the German Federal Fiscal Court of 31 May 2017, I R 37/15, not be subject to corporate income tax; the legal fiction according to which 5% of the gains are treated as non-deductible business expenses shall not apply. The judgment seems to be accepted by tax authorities. Furthermore, most double taxation treaties provide for exemption from German taxation and attribute the right of taxation to the shareholder's state of residence. According to the tax authorities there is no obligation to levy withholding tax at source in the case of a Qualified Holding if the shareholder submits to the Domestic Paying Agent a certificate of residence issued by a competent foreign tax authority.

        With regard to capital gains or losses from shares attributable to a domestic permanent establishment or fixed place of business or which form part of business assets for which a permanent representative in Germany has been appointed, the above-mentioned provisions pertaining to shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany whose shares are business assets apply mutatis mutandis (see "Taxation of capital gains of shareholders with a tax domicile in Germany—Shares held as business assets "). The Domestic Paying Agent can refrain from deducting the withholding tax if the shareholder declares to the Domestic Paying Agent on an official form that the shares form part of domestic business assets and certain other requirements are met.

Abolishment of Solidarity Surcharge

        According to a bill enacted in December 2019, the solidarity surcharge has been partially abolished as of the assessment period 2021 for certain individual shareholders.

Inheritance and Gift Tax

        The transfer of shares to another person mortis causa or by way of munificent donation is generally subject to German inheritance or gift tax if:

    (i)
    the place of residence, habitual abode, place of management or registered office of the decedent, the donor, the heir, the donee or another acquirer is, at the time of the asset transfer, in Germany, or such person, as a German national, has not spent more than five continuous years outside of Germany without maintaining a place of residence in Germany, or

    (ii)
    the decedent's or donor's shares belonged to business assets for which there had been a permanent establishment in Germany or a permanent representative had been appointed, or

    (iii)
    the decedent or the donor, at the time of the succession or gift, held a direct or indirect interest of at least 10% of the Company's share capital either alone or jointly with other related parties.

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        The small number of double taxation treaties in respect of inheritance and gift tax which Germany has concluded to date usually provide for German inheritance or gift tax only to be levied in the cases under (i) and, subject to certain restrictions, in the cases under (ii). Special provisions apply to certain German nationals living outside of Germany and to former German nationals.

Other Taxes

        No German financial transfer taxes, VAT, stamp duties or similar taxes are currently levied on the purchase or disposal or other forms of transfer of the shares. However, for VAT purposes, an entrepreneur may opt for taxation in relation to disposals of shares, which are in principle exempt from value-added-tax, if the sale is made to another entrepreneur for the entrepreneur's business. Wealth tax is currently not levied in Germany.

        However, on February 14, 2013, the European Commission published a proposal for a Directive for a common financial transaction tax in Belgium, Germany, Estonia, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Austria, Portugal, Sloveni