UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
___________________________________________________ 
FORM 10-K
___________________________________________________  
x     Annual Report Pursuant To Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2018
OR
¨     Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
___________________________________________________   
Commission File Number 1-14514
Consolidated Edison, Inc.
Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter
and principal office address and telephone number
New York
 
13-3965100
State of Incorporation
 
I.R.S. Employer
ID. Number
4 Irving Place,
New York, New York 10003
(212) 460-4600
 ___________________________________________________  
Commission File Number 1-1217
Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.
Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter
and principal office address and telephone number
New York
 
13-5009340
State of Incorporation
 
I.R.S. Employer
ID. Number
4 Irving Place,
New York, New York 10003
(212) 460-4600
 ___________________________________________________  
Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
  
 
Name of each exchange
on which registered
Consolidated Edison, Inc.,
  
 
 
 
Common Shares ($.10 par value)
  
 
New York Stock Exchange

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
1


Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
 
Consolidated Edison, Inc. (Con Edison)
Yes
 
x
 
No 
 
¨
 
 
Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (CECONY)
Yes
 
x
 
No 
 
¨
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.
 
Con Edison
Yes 
 
¨
 
No 
 
x
 
 
CECONY
Yes 
 
¨
 
No 
 
x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
Con Edison
Yes 
 
x
 
No 
 
¨
 
 
CECONY
Yes 
 
x
 
No 
 
¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
 
Con Edison
Yes 
 
x
 
No 
 
¨
 
 
CECONY
Yes 
 
x
 
No 
 
¨
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Con Edison
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Large accelerated filer
 
x
 
Accelerated filer
 
¨
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
¨
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
 
Emerging growth company
 
¨
 
 
 
 
CECONY
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Large accelerated filer
 
¨
 
Accelerated filer
 
¨
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
x
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
 
Emerging growth company
 
¨
 
 
 
 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Con Edison
 
Yes 
 
¨
 
No 
 
x
 
CECONY
 
Yes 
 
¨
 
No 
 
x
 
The aggregate market value of the common equity of Con Edison held by non-affiliates of Con Edison, as of June 30, 2018 , was approximately $24.3 billion.
As of January 31, 2019 , Con Edison had outstanding 321,077,152 Common Shares ($.10 par value).
All of the outstanding common equity of CECONY is held by Con Edison.


2
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



Documents Incorporated By Reference
Portions of Con Edison’s definitive proxy statement for its Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on May 20, 2019, to be filed with the Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A, not later than 120 days after December 31, 2018 , is incorporated in Part III of this report.
Filing Format
This Annual Report on Form 10-K is a combined report being filed separately by two different registrants: Consolidated Edison, Inc. (Con Edison) and Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (CECONY). CECONY is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Con Edison and, as such, the information in this report about CECONY also applies to Con Edison. CECONY meets the conditions set forth in General Instruction (I)(1)(a) and (b) of Form 10-K and is therefore filing this Form 10-K with the reduced disclosure format.
As used in this report, the term the “Companies” refers to Con Edison and CECONY. However, CECONY makes no representation as to the information contained in this report relating to Con Edison or the subsidiaries of Con Edison other than itself.


CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
3


Glossary of Terms
The following is a glossary of abbreviations or acronyms that are used in the Companies’ SEC reports:
Con Edison Companies
 
 
Con Edison
 
Consolidated Edison, Inc.
CECONY
 
Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc.
Clean Energy Businesses
 
Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses, Inc., together with its subsidiaries
Con Edison Development
 
Consolidated Edison Development, Inc.
Con Edison Energy
 
Consolidated Edison Energy, Inc.
Con Edison Solutions
 
Consolidated Edison Solutions, Inc.
Con Edison Transmission
 
Con Edison Transmission, Inc., together with its subsidiaries
CET Electric
 
Consolidated Edison Transmission, LLC
CET Gas
 
Con Edison Gas Pipeline and Storage, LLC
O&R
 
Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc.
RECO
 
Rockland Electric Company
The Companies
 
Con Edison and CECONY
The Utilities
 
CECONY and O&R
 
Regulatory Agencies, Government Agencies and Other Organizations
EPA
 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
FASB
 
Financial Accounting Standards Board
FERC
 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
IASB
 
International Accounting Standards Board
IRS
 
Internal Revenue Service
NJBPU
 
New Jersey Board of Public Utilities
NJDEP
 
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
NYISO
 
New York Independent System Operator
NYPA
 
New York Power Authority
NYSDEC
 
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
NYSERDA
 
New York State Energy Research and Development Authority
NYSPSC
 
New York State Public Service Commission
NYSRC
 
New York State Reliability Council, LLC
PJM
 
PJM Interconnection LLC
SEC
 
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
 
 
Accounting
 
 
AFUDC
 
Allowance for funds used during construction
ASU
 
Accounting Standards Update
GAAP
 
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States of America
HLBV
 
Hypothetical Liquidation at Book Value
LILO
 
Lease In/Lease Out
OCI
 
Other Comprehensive Income
VIE
 
Variable Interest Entity

4
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



 
Environmental
 
 
CO2
 
Carbon dioxide
GHG
 
Greenhouse gases
MGP Sites
 
Manufactured gas plant sites
PCBs
 
Polychlorinated biphenyls
PRP
 
Potentially responsible party
RGGI
 
Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative
Superfund
 
Federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 and similar state statutes
 
 
Units of Measure
 
 
AC
 
Alternating current
Bcf
 
Billion cubic feet
Dt
 
Dekatherms
kV
 
Kilovolt
kWh
 
Kilowatt-hour
MDt
 
Thousand dekatherms
Mlb
 
Thousands of pounds
MMlb
 
Million pounds
MVA
 
Megavolt ampere
MW
 
Megawatt or thousand kilowatts
MWh
 
Megawatt hour
 
 
Other
 
 
AMI
 
Advanced metering infrastructure
COSO
 
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission
DER
 
Distributed energy resources
Fitch
 
Fitch Ratings
LTIP
 
Long Term Incentive Plan
Moody’s
 
Moody’s Investors Service
REV
 
Reforming the Energy Vision
S&P
 
S&P Global Ratings
TCJA
 
The federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, as enacted on December 22, 2017
VaR
 
Value-at-Risk

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
5


TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PAGE
 
Item 1:
Item 1A:
Item 1B:
Item 2:
Item 3:
Item 4:
 
 
 
Item 5:
Item 6:
Item 7:
Item 7A:
Item 8:
Item 9:
Item 9A:
Item 9B:
 
 
Item 10:
Item 11:
Item 12:
Item 13:
Item 14:
 
 
Item 15:
Item 16:
 

6
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



Introduction
This introduction contains certain information about Con Edison and its subsidiaries, including CECONY. This introduction is not a summary and should be read together with, and is qualified in its entirety by reference to, the more detailed information appearing elsewhere or incorporated by reference in this report.
Con Edison’s mission is to provide energy services to our customers safely, reliably, efficiently and in an environmentally sound manner; to provide a workplace that allows employees to realize their full potential; to provide a fair return to our investors; and to improve the quality of life in the communities we serve. The company has ongoing programs designed to support its mission, including initiatives focused on safety, operational excellence, the customer experience and cost optimization.
Con Edison is a holding company that owns:
 
Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (CECONY), which delivers electricity, natural gas and steam to customers in New York City and Westchester County;
Orange & Rockland Utilities, Inc. (O&R), which together with its subsidiary, Rockland Electric Company, delivers electricity and natural gas to customers primarily located in southeastern New York State and northern New Jersey (O&R, together with CECONY referred to as the Utilities);
Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses, Inc., which through its subsidiaries develops, owns and operates renewable and energy infrastructure projects and provides energy-related products and services to wholesale and retail customers (Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses, Inc., together with its subsidiaries referred to as the Clean Energy Businesses); and
Con Edison Transmission, Inc., which through its subsidiaries invests in electric and gas transmission projects (Con Edison Transmission, Inc., together with its subsidiaries referred to as Con Edison Transmission).
Con Edison anticipates that the Utilities, which are subject to extensive regulation, will continue to provide substantially all of its earnings over the next few years. The Utilities have approved rate plans that are generally designed to cover each company’s cost of service, including capital and other costs of each company’s energy delivery systems. The Utilities recover from their full-service customers (who purchase energy from them), generally on a current basis, the cost the Utilities pay for energy and charge all of their customers the cost of delivery service. See "Utility Regulation" in Item 1, "Risk Factors" in Item 1A and "Rate Plans" in Note B to the financial statements in Item 8.
 
Selected Financial Data
Con Edison
  
For the Year Ended December 31,
(Millions of Dollars, except per share amounts)
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018

 
Operating revenues
$12,919
 
$12,554
 
$12,075
 
$12,033
 
12,337

 
Energy costs
4,513
 
3,716
 
3,088
 
2,625
 
2,948

 
Operating income (h)
2,591
 
2,879
 
2,780
 
2,774
 
2,664

 
Net income
1,092
 
1,193
 
1,245
 
1,525
(g)
1,382

(g)
Total assets (e)(f)
44,071
 
45,642
(a)
48,255
(b)
48,111
(c)
53,920

(d)
Long-term debt (e)
11,546
 
12,006
 
14,735
 
14,731
 
17,495

 
Total equity
12,585
 
13,061
 
14,306
 
15,425
 
16,839

 
Net Income per common share – basic
$3.73
 
$4.07
 
$4.15
 
$4.97
 
$4.43
 
Net Income per common share – diluted
$3.71
 
$4.05
 
$4.12
 
$4.94
 
$4.42
 
Dividends declared per common share
$2.52
 
$2.60
 
$2.68
 
$2.76
 
$2.86
 
Book value per share
$42.97
 
$44.50
 
$46.91
 
$49.72
 
$52.46
 
Average common shares outstanding (millions)
293
 
293
 
300
 
307
 
312
 
(a)
Reflects a $2,382 million increase in net plant offset by a $970 million decrease in regulatory assets for unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs. See Notes B , E and F to the financial statements in Item 8.
(b)
Reflects a $3,007 million increase in net plant offset by a $1,002 million decrease in regulatory assets for unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs. See Notes B , E and F to the financial statements in Item 8.
(c)
Reflects a $2.384 million increase in net plant, offset by decreases in regulatory assets resulting from the enactment of the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, as enacted on December 22, 2017 (TCJA) of $2,418 million (including the netting of $1,168 million against the

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
7


regulatory liability for future income tax) and unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs of $348 million. See Notes B , E , F and L to the financial statements in Item 8.
(d)
Reflects a $4,149 million increase in net plant, offset by a $ 288 million decrease in regulatory assets for unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs. See Notes B , E , and F to the financial statements in Item 8.
(e)
Reflects $85 million in 2014, related to the adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2015-03, “Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs.”
(f)
Reflects $152 million in 2014, related to the adoption of ASU No. 2015-17, “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes.”
(g)
In 2017, upon enactment of the TCJA, Con Edison re-measured its deferred tax assets and liabilities based upon the 21 percent corporate income tax rate under the TCJA. As a result, Con Edison decreased its net deferred tax liabilities by $5,312 million , recognized $259 million (or $0.85 per share) in net income, decreased its regulatory asset for future income tax by $1,250 million , decreased its regulatory asset for revenue taxes by $90 million , and accrued a regulatory liability for federal income tax rate change of $3,713 million . In 2018, the company recognized $42 million of income tax expense resulting from a re-measurement of its deferred tax assets and liabilities following the issuance of proposed TCJA regulations. See “Other Regulatory Matters” in Note B and Note L to the financial statements in Item 8.
(h)
Excludes the non-service components of pension and other postretirement benefits. See Notes E and F to the financial statements in Item 8.

CECONY  
  
For the Year Ended December 31,
(Millions of Dollars)
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
 
Operating revenues
$10,786
 
$10,328
 
$10,165
 
$10,468
 
$10,680
 
Energy costs
2,985
 
2,304
 
2,059
 
2,141
 
2,339
 
Operating income (g)
2,494
 
2,670
 
2,451
 
2,549
 
2,354
 
Net income
1,058
 
1,084
 
1,056
 
1,104
 
1,196
 
Total assets (e)(f)
39,443
 
40,230
(a)
40,856
(b)
40,451
(c)
43,108
(d)
Long-term debt (e)
10,788
 
10,787
 
12,073
 
12,065
 
13,676
 
Shareholder’s equity
11,188
 
11,415
 
11,829
 
12,439
 
12,910
 
(a)
Reflects a $1,725 million increase in net plant and a $912 million decr ease in regulatory assets for unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs. See Notes B , E and F to the financial statements in Item 8.
(b)
Reflects a $1,804 million increase in net plant and a $967 million decrease in regulatory assets for unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs. See Notes B , E and F to the financial statements in Item 8.
(c)
Reflects a $2,090 million increase in net plant, offset by decreases in regulatory assets resulting from the enactment of the TCJA of $2,305 million (including the netting of $1,123 million against the regulatory liability for future income tax) and unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs of $354 million. See Notes B , E , F and L to the financial statements in Item 8.
(d)
Reflects a $2,165 million increase in net plant and a $ 265 million decrease in regulatory assets for unrecognized pension and other postretirement costs. See Notes B , E , F and L to the financial statements in Item 8.
(e)
Reflects $76 million in 2014, related to the adoption of ASU No. 2015-03, “Interest - Imputation of Interest (Subtopic 835-30): Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs.”
(f)
Reflects $118 million in 2014, related to the adoption of ASU No. 2015-17, “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes.”
(g)
Excludes the non-service components of pension and other postretirement benefits. See Notes E and F to the financial statements in Item 8.


Significant Developments and Outlook
Con Edison reported 2018 net income of $1,382 million or $4.43 a share compared with $1,525 million or $4.97 a share in 2017 . Adjusted earnings were $1,349 million or $4.33 a share in 2018 compared with $1,264 million or $4.12 a share in 2017 . See “Results of Operations” in Item 7 and “Non-GAAP Financial Measure” below.
In 2018 , the Utilities invested $3,210 million to upgrade and reinforce their energy delivery systems, Con Edison Transmission invested $248 million in electric transmission and gas pipeline and storage businesses and the Clean Energy Businesses invested $1,791 million primarily in renewable electric production projects, including $ 1,609 million to acquire Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC in December 2018. See "Capital Requirements and Resources" in Item 1 and Note U to the financial statements in Item 8.
In 2019 , the Utilities expect to invest $3,227 million for their energy delivery systems, Con Edison Transmission expects to invest $200 million in gas pipeline businesses and the Clean Energy Businesses expect to invest $200 million in renewable electric production projects. Con Edison plans to meet its 2019 capital requirements, including for maturing securities, through internally-generated funds and the issuance of long-term debt and common equity. The company's plans include the issuance of between $1,600 million and $2,200 million of long-term debt , mostly at the Utilities, and the issuance of additional debt secured by its renewable electric production projects. The company’s plans also include the issuance of up to $500 million of common equity in addition to equity under its dividend reinvestment, employee stock purchase and long term incentive plans and

8
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



the physical settlement of the estimated $425 million remaining portion of its November 2018 equity forward transaction.
CECONY forecasts average annual growth in peak demand in its service area at design conditions over the next five years for electric and gas to be approximately 0.1  percent and 1.0 percent, respectively, and an average annual decrease in steam peak demand in its service area at design conditions over the next five years to be approximately 0.5 percent. In January 2019, due to gas supply constraints, CECONY filed notice with the NYSPSC to establish a temporary moratorium beginning in March 2019 on new applications for firm gas service in most of Westchester County. O&R forecasts average annual decrease in electric peak demand in its service area at design conditions over the next five years to be approximately 0.3 percent and average annual growth in gas peak demand in its service area over the next five years at design conditions to be approximately 0.6 percent. See “The Utilities” in Item 1.
In 2018, O&R, the staff of the New York State Public Service Commission (NYSPSC) and other parties entered into a joint proposal for new electric and gas rates. The joint proposal is subject to NYSPSC approval. The joint proposal provides for electric rate increases of $13.4 million, $8.0 million and $5.8 million, effective January 1, 2019, 2020 and 2021, respectively. The joint proposal provides for a gas rate decrease of $7.5 million, effective January 1, 2019 and gas rate increases of $3.6 million and $0.7 million effective January 1, 2020 and 2021, respectively. See “Rate Plans” in Note B to the financial statements in Item 8.
In 2018, the NYSPSC continued its Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) and related proceedings. See “Utility Regulation - State Utility Regulation - Reforming the Energy Vision” in Item 1. The NYSPSC also continued its proceedings related to the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, as enacted on December 22, 2017 (TCJA), income tax accounting and an April 2017 subway power outage. In addition, the NYSPSC commenced investigations into the Utilities' preparation and response to the March 2018 Winter Storms Riley and Quinn and a July 2018 CECONY steam main rupture. See "Other Regulatory Matters" in Note B, Note H and Note L to the financial statements in Item 8.
In January 2019, CECONY filed a request with the NYSPSC for electric and gas rate increases of $485 million and $210 million, respectively, effective January 2020. See “Rate Plans” in Note B to the financial statements in Item 8.
In January 2019, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The output of Con Edison Development renewable electric production projects with an aggregate of 680 MW (AC) of generating capacity (PG&E Projects) is sold to PG&E under long-term power purchase agreements (PG&E PPAs). At December 31, 2018, Con Edison’s consolidated balance sheet included $885 million of net non-utility plant relating to the PG&E Projects, of $1,125 million of intangible assets relating to the PG&E PPAs, $292 million of net non-utility plant of additional projects that secure the related project debt and $1,050 million of related project debt. The PG&E bankruptcy is an event of default under the PG&E PPAs. Pursuant to the related project debt agreements, distributions from the related projects to Con Edison Development have been suspended. Unless the lenders for the related project debt otherwise agree, the lenders may, upon written notice, declare principal and interest on the related project debt to be due and payable immediately and, if such amounts are not timely paid, foreclose on the related projects. See “Clean Energy Businesses - Con Edison Development” in Item 1 and “Long-Lived and Intangible Assets” in Note A and "Long-term Debt" in Note C to the financial statements in Item 8.
Available Information
Con Edison and CECONY file annual, quarterly and current reports and other information, and Con Edison files proxy statements, with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The SEC maintains an Internet site at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy statements, and other information regarding issuers (including Con Edison and CECONY) that file electronically with the SEC.
This information the Companies file with the SEC is also available free of charge on or through the investor information section of their websites as soon as reasonably practicable after the reports are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. Con Edison’s internet website is at: www.conedison.com; and CECONY’s is at: www.coned.com.
The "About Us - Corporate Governance" section of Con Edison’s website includes the company’s Standards of Business Conduct (its code of ethics) and amendments or waivers of the standards for executive officers or directors, corporate governance guidelines and the charters of the following committees of the company’s Board of Directors: Audit Committee, Management Development and Compensation Committee, and Corporate Governance

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
9


and Nominating Committee. This information is available in print to any shareholder who requests it. Requests should be directed to: Corporate Secretary, Consolidated Edison, Inc., 4 Irving Place, New York, NY 10003.
The "About Us - Sustainability Report” section of Con Edison’s website includes “A Clean Energy Vision,” the company’s 2017-2018 sustainability report.
Information on the Companies’ websites is not incorporated herein.
Forward-Looking Statements
This report contains forward-looking statements that are intended to qualify for the safe-harbor provisions of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements are statements of future expectations and not facts. Words such as "forecasts," "expects," "estimates," "anticipates," "intends," "believes," "plans," "will" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements reflect information available and assumptions at the time the statements are made, and speak only as of that time. Actual results or developments might differ materially from those included in the forward-looking statements because of various factors including, but not limited to, those discussed under “Risk Factors,” in Item 1A.

Non-GAAP Financial Measure
Adjusted earnings is a financial measure that is not determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America (GAAP). This non-GAAP financial measure should not be considered as an alternative to net income, which is an indicator of financial performance determined in accordance with GAAP. Adjusted earnings excludes from net income certain other items that the company does not consider indicative of its ongoing financial performance. Management uses this non-GAAP financial measure to facilitate the analysis of the company's financial performance as compared to its internal budgets and previous financial results. Management also uses this non-GAAP financial measure to communicate to investors and others the company’s expectations regarding its future earnings and dividends on its common stock. Management believes that this non-GAAP financial measure also is useful and meaningful to investors to facilitate their analysis of the company's financial performance. The following table is a reconciliation of Con Edison’s reported net income to adjusted earnings and reported earnings per share to adjusted earnings per share. 

10
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



(Millions of Dollars, except per share amounts)
2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Reported net income for common stock – GAAP basis
$1,092
$1,193
$1,245
$1,525
$1,382
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income tax effect of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (a)



(259
)
42
Gain on sale of solar electric production projects (pre-tax)
(45)


(2)

Income taxes (b)
19


1

Gain on sale of solar electric production projects (net of tax)
(26
)


(1
)

Loss from LILO transactions (pre-tax)(c)
2




Income taxes (b)
(1)




Loss from LILO transactions (net of tax)(c)
1




Impairment of assets held for sale (pre-tax)

5



Income taxes (b)

(2)



Impairment of assets held for sale (net of tax)

3




Gain on sale of the Clean Energy Businesses' retail electric supply business (pre-tax)


(104
)


Income taxes (b)


48


Gain on sale of the Clean Energy Businesses' retail electric supply business (net of tax)


(56
)


Goodwill impairment related to the Clean Energy Businesses' energy service business (pre-tax)


15


Income taxes (b)


(3)


Goodwill impairment related to the Clean Energy Businesses' energy service business (net of tax)


12



Gain on acquisition of Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC, net of transaction costs (pre-tax) (d)




(114)
Income taxes (b)




33
Gain on acquisition of Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC, net of transaction costs (net of tax) (d)




(81)
Net mark-to-market effects of the Clean Energy Businesses (pre-tax)
128

(5)
(1)
8
Income taxes (b)
(55)

2

(2)
Net mark-to-market effects of the Clean Energy Businesses (net of tax)
73

(3
)
(1)
6
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted earnings
$1,140
$1,196
$1,198
$1,264
$1,349
Reported earnings per share – GAAP basis (basic)
$3.73
$4.07
$4.15
$4.97
$4.43
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income tax effect of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (a)



(0.85)
0.14
Gain on sale of solar electric production projects (pre-tax)
(0.15
)




Income taxes (b)
0.06




Gain on sale of solar electric production projects (net of tax)
(0.09)




Loss from LILO transactions (pre-tax) (c)





Income taxes (b)





Loss from LILO transactions (net of tax) (c)





Impairment of assets held for sale (pre-tax)

0.02



Income taxes (b)

(0.01)



Impairment of assets held for sale (net of tax)

0.01



Gain on sale of the Clean Energy Businesses' retail electric supply business (pre-tax)


(0.35)


Income taxes (b)


0.16


Gain on sale of the Clean Energy Businesses' retail electric supply business (net of tax)


(0.19)


Goodwill impairment related to the Clean Energy Businesses' energy service business (pre-tax)


0.07


Income taxes (b)


(0.03)


Goodwill impairment related to the Clean Energy Businesses' energy service business (net of tax)


0.04


Gain on acquisition of Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC, net of transaction costs (pre-tax) (d)




(0.36)
Income taxes (b)




0.10
Gain on acquisition of Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC, net of transaction costs (net of tax) (d)




(0.26)
Net mark-to-market effects of the Clean Energy Businesses (pre-tax)
0.42

(0.02)

0.03
Income taxes (b)
(0.17)

(0.01)

(0.01)
Net mark-to-market effects of the Clean Energy Businesses
0.25

(0.01)

0.02
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted earnings per share
$3.89
$4.08
$3.99
$4.12
$4.33
(a)
In 2017, upon enactment of the TCJA, Con Edison re-measured its deferred tax assets and liabilities based upon the 21 percent corporate income tax rate under the TCJA. As a result, Con Edison decreased its net deferred tax liabilities by $5,312 million , recognized $259 million

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
11


(or $0.85 per share) in net income, decreased its regulatory asset for future income tax by $1,250 million , decreased its regulatory asset for revenue taxes by $90 million , and accrued a regulatory liability for federal income tax rate change of $3,713 million . In 2018, the company recognized $42 million of income tax expense resulting from a re-measurement of its deferred tax assets and liabilities following the issuance of the proposed TCJA regulations. See “Other Regulatory Matters” in Note B and Note L to the financial statements in Item 8.
(b)
The amount of income taxes was calculated using a combined federal and state income tax rate of 28% for the year ended December 31, 2018 and a combined federal and state income tax rate of 40% for the years ended December 31, 2014-2017.
(c)
In 2013, a court disallowed tax losses claimed by Con Edison relating to Con Edison Development’s Lease In/Lease Out (LILO) transactions and the company subsequently terminated the transactions, resulting in a charge to earnings of $95 million (after taxes of $63 million). In 2014, adjustments were made to taxes and accrued interest.
(d)
Gain recognized with respect to jointly-owned renewable energy production projects upon completion of the acquisition of Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC, net of transaction costs for the acquisition. See Note U to the financial statements in Item 8.


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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



Item 1:    Business

Contents of Item 1
Page
 


CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
13


Contents of Item 1
Page
Incorporation By Reference
Information in any item of this report as to which reference is made in this Item 1 is hereby incorporated by reference in this Item 1. The use of terms such as “see” or “refer to” shall be deemed to incorporate into Item 1 at the place such term is used the information to which such reference is made.

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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



PART I
 
Item 1:    Business

Overview
Consolidated Edison, Inc. (Con Edison), incorporated in New York State in 1997, is a holding company that owns all of the outstanding common stock of Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (CECONY), Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc. (O&R), Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses, Inc. and Con Edison Transmission, Inc. As used in this report, the term the “Companies” refers to Con Edison and CECONY.
CEIORGCHARTVFA15.JPG
Con Edison’s principal business operations are those of CECONY, O&R, the Clean Energy Businesses and Con Edison Transmission. CECONY’s principal business operations are its regulated electric, gas and steam delivery businesses. O&R’s principal business operations are its regulated electric and gas delivery businesses. The Clean Energy Businesses develop, own and operate renewable and energy infrastructure projects and provide energy-related products and services to wholesale and retail customers. Con Edison Transmission invests in electric transmission facilities and gas pipeline and storage facilities.
Con Edison seeks to provide shareholder value through continued dividend growth, supported by earnings growth in regulated utilities and contracted assets. The company invests to provide reliable, resilient, safe and clean energy critical for New York City’s growing economy. The company is an industry leading owner and operator of contracted, large-scale solar generation in the United States. Con Edison is a responsible neighbor, helping the communities it serves become more sustainable.

CECONY
Electric
CECONY provides electric service to approximately 3.5 million customers in all of New York City (except a part of Queens) and most of Westchester County, an approximately 660 square mile service area with a population of more than nine million.

Gas
CECONY delivers gas to approximately 1.1 million customers in Manhattan, the Bronx, parts of Queens and most of Westchester County.

Steam
CECONY operates the largest steam distribution system in the United States by producing and delivering approximately 21,761 MMlb of steam annually to approximately 1,622 customers in parts of Manhattan.


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O&R
Electric
O&R and its utility subsidiary, Rockland Electric Company (RECO) (together referred to herein as O&R) provide electric service to approximately 0.3 million customers in southeastern New York and northern New Jersey, an approximately 1,300 square mile service area.

Gas
O&R delivers gas to over 0.1 million customers in southeastern New York.

Clean Energy Businesses
Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses, Inc. has three wholly-owned subsidiaries: Consolidated Edison Development, Inc. (Con Edison Development), Consolidated Edison Energy, Inc. (Con Edison Energy) and Consolidated Edison Solutions, Inc. (Con Edison Solutions). Con Edison Clean Energy Businesses, Inc., together with these subsidiaries, are referred to in this report as the Clean Energy Businesses. The Clean Energy Businesses develop, own and operate renewable and energy infrastructure projects and provide energy-related products and services to wholesale and retail customers. In December 2018, a Con Edison Development subsidiary acquired Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC. See Note U to the financial statements in Item 8.

Con Edison Transmission
Con Edison Transmission, Inc. invests in electric and gas transmission projects through its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Consolidated Edison Transmission, LLC (CET Electric) and Con Edison Gas Pipeline and Storage, LLC (CET Gas). CET Electric owns a 45.7 percent interest in New York Transco LLC, which owns and is proposing to build additional electric transmission assets in New York. CET Gas owns, through subsidiaries, a 50 percent interest in Stagecoach Gas Services, LLC, a joint venture that owns, operates and will further develop an existing gas pipeline and storage business located in northern Pennsylvania and southern New York. Also, CET Gas and CECONY own 71.2 percent and 28.8 percent interests, respectively, in Honeoye Storage Corporation, which operates a gas storage facility in upstate New York. In addition, CET Gas owns a 12.5 percent interest in Mountain Valley Pipeline LLC, a joint venture developing a proposed 300-mile gas transmission project in West Virginia and Virginia (Mountain Valley Pipeline). See “Con Edison Transmission,” below. Con Edison Transmission, Inc., together with CET Electric and CET Gas, are referred to in this report as Con Edison Transmission.

Utility Regulation
State Utility Regulation

Regulators
The Utilities are subject to regulation by the NYSPSC, which under the New York Public Service Law, is authorized to set the terms of service and the rates the Utilities charge for providing service in New York. See “Rate Plans,” below and in Note B to the financial statements in Item 8. The NYSPSC also approves the issuance of the Utilities’ securities and transactions between the Utilities and Con Edison and its other subsidiaries. See “Capital Resources,” below and Note S to the financial statements in Item 8. The NYSPSC exercises jurisdiction over the siting of electric transmission lines in New York State (see “Con Edison Transmission,” below) and approves mergers or other business combinations involving New York utilities. In addition, the NYSPSC has the authority to (i) impose penalties on New York utilities, which could be material, for violating state utility laws and regulations and its orders; (ii) review, at least every five years, an electric utility’s capability to provide safe, adequate and reliable service, order the utility to comply with additional and more stringent terms of service than existed prior to the review, assess the continued operation of the utility as the provider of electric service in its service territory and propose, and act upon, such measures as are necessary to ensure safe and adequate service; and (iii) based on findings of repeated violations of the New York Public Service Law or rules or regulations adopted thereto that demonstrate a failure of a combination gas and electric utility to continue to provide safe and adequate service, revoke or modify an operating certificate issued to the utility by the NYSPSC (following consideration of certain factors, including public interest and standards deemed necessary by the NYSPSC to ensure continuity of service, and due process). See “Other Regulatory Matters” in Note B to the financial statements in Item 8. O&R’s New Jersey subsidiary, RECO, is subject to regulation by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (NJBPU). The NYSPSC, together with the NJBPU, are referred to herein as state utility regulators.

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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



New York Utility Industry
Restructuring in the 1990s
In the 1990s, the NYSPSC restructured the electric utility industry in the state. In accordance with NYSPSC orders, the Utilities sold all of their electric generating facilities other than those that also produce steam for CECONY’s steam business (see "Electric Operations – Electric Facilities," below) and provided all of their customers the choice to buy electricity or gas from the Utilities or other suppliers (see "Electric Operations – Electric Sales and Deliveries" and "Gas Operations – Gas Sales and Deliveries," below). In 2018, 64 percent of the electricity and 33 percent of the gas CECONY delivered to its customers, and 56 percent of the electricity and 37 percent of the gas O&R delivered to its customers, was purchased by the customers from other suppliers. In addition, the Utilities no longer control and operate their bulk power electric transmission facilities. See “New York Independent System Operator (NYISO),” below.
Following industry restructuring, there were several utility mergers as a result of which substantially all of the electric and gas delivery service in New York State is now provided by one of four investor-owned utility companies – Con Edison, National Grid plc, Avangrid, Inc. (an affiliate of Iberdrola, S.A.) or CH Energy Group, Inc. (a subsidiary of Fortis Inc.) – or one of two state authorities – New York Power Authority (NYPA) or Long Island Power Authority.

Reforming the Energy Vision
In April 2014, the NYSPSC began a multi-year process to Reform the Energy Vision (REV) to improve electric system efficiency and reliability, encourage renewable energy resources, support distributed energy resources (DER), and enable more customer choice. DER includes distributed generation (such as solar electric production facilities, fuel cells and micro-turbines), energy storage and demand reduction and energy efficiency programs. The NYSPSC’s REV and the various related proceedings generally have progressed along three tracks.
Track 1 - Integrate DER into the Electric System
The NYSPSC is addressing development by New York electric utilities of a distributed system platform to manage and coordinate DER in their service areas, under NYSPSC regulation, and to provide customers, together with third parties, with data and tools to better manage their energy use. The NYSPSC has required the utilities to file distributed system implementation plans and energy efficiency plans (see “Environmental Matters - Climate Change," below). The NYSPSC has limited the circumstances under which utilities would be allowed to own DER and made utility affiliate ownership of DER within the utility’s service territory subject to market power protections. The NYSPSC also ordered the utilities to develop demonstration projects to inform distributed system platform business models and to measure customer response to REV markets, and approved cost recovery mechanism for these projects. Through December 2018, the NYSPSC staff has approved eight CECONY,three O&R, and one joint CECONY-O&R demonstration projects.
The NYSPSC has approved CECONY’s advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) plan for its electric and gas delivery businesses, subject to a cap on capital expenditures of $1,285 million. AMI components including smart meters, a communication network, information technology systems and business applications will facilitate REV initiatives. The plan provides for full deployment of AMI to CECONY’s customers by 2022. The NYSPSC has also authorized O&R to expend $98 million to deploy AMI for all of its New York customers.
Track 2 - Modify Ratemaking Design to Promote REV Objectives
The NYSPSC has adopted a ratemaking and utility revenue framework with four ways for utilities to achieve earnings: traditional cost-of-service earnings; earnings tied to non-traditional alternatives that reduce utility capital spending and provide consumer benefit as defined by the NYPSC; earnings from market-facing platform development activities; and earnings from outcome-based performance measures. The NYSPSC has indicated that existing measures for negative revenue adjustments for utility failure to meet basic service standards should generally be retained and net utility plant reconciliations should be modified to encourage cost-effective DER as an alternative to traditional utility capital investment. The Utilities’ current New York rate plans include earnings adjustment, negative revenue adjustments and net utility plant reconciliation mechanisms. See “Rate Plans” in Note B to the financial statements in Item 8.
The NYSPSC has established a benefit-cost analysis framework for, among other things, utility proposals to meet system needs through non-traditional DER alternatives that meet distribution system needs. The framework’s primary measure is a societal cost test that, in addition to addressing avoided utility costs, quantifies certain environmental externalities and, where appropriate, other externalities. At the NYSPSC’s direction, CECONY and O&R, and the other electric utilities, have developed and filed benefit-cost analysis handbooks with their distributed system implementation plans to guide DER providers in structuring their projects and proposals.

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The NYSPSC began to change compensation for DER and phase out net energy metering in 2017. In New York, net energy metering compensates kilowatt-hours exported to the electric distribution system at the full service rate (that is production plus delivery plus taxes and fees). The NYSPSC allowed all existing resources to keep their current rate treatment and delayed making significant changes to policies affecting new residential and small commercial private rooftop solar until 2020. Larger installations, including new commercial and industrial projects and new community solar projects, will be paid for the value of their exports to the electricity distribution system. The new policy is intended to limit bill increases to two percent, reducing the impact of this policy on non-participating residential customers that would have occurred under net energy metering. In 2018, the NYSPSC staff issued additional whitepapers addressing standby and buyback rates, capacity value compensation, and future DER compensation.
In December 2018, the NYSPSC approved CECONY’s pricing pilot for residential and small-commercial customers that will test seven different types of rate designs, including demand-based distribution rates and a subscription-based distribution rate.
Track 3 - Support State Energy Plan Clean Energy Goals
In August 2016, the NYSPSC established a clean energy standard to achieve the State Energy Plan’s goals to provide 50 percent of the State’s electricity from renewable resources and to reduce carbon emissions by 40 percent by 2030 (see “Environmental Matters - Climate Change,” below) and to support the continued operation of upstate nuclear plants. Since 2017, load serving entities, including CECONY and O&R for their full-service customers, are required to obtain renewable energy credits (RECs) and zero-emissions credits (ZECs) in amounts determined by the NYSPSC. Load serving entities may satisfy their REC obligation by either purchasing RECs acquired through central procurement by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), by self-supply through direct purchase of tradable RECs, or by making alternative compliance payments. The NYSPSC has not authorized New York utilities to own renewable electric production projects (except in limited circumstances, such as a shared solar pilot program for low-income customers) or required utilities to sign power purchase agreements with owners of such projects. Load serving entities purchase ZECs from NYSERDA at prices determined by the NYSPSC.
In July 2018, the NYSPSC established an offshore wind renewable energy standard. NYSERDA is to conduct offshore wind project solicitations in 2018 and 2019 for 800 MW, although it allows flexibility for NYSERDA to procure all 800 MW and up to 1,100 MW with additional NYSPSC action in a single solicitation. NYSERDA is able to purchase offshore wind renewable energy credits (ORECs) from developers under 20- to 25-year contracts. Load-serving entities, such as CECONY and O&R, will be required to purchase ORECs from NYSERDA beginning in 2025 when projects are expected to begin operation.
In May 2018, the NYSPSC initiated a proceeding on the role of electric utilities in providing needed infrastructure and rate options to advance adoption of electric vehicles. The NYSPSC has approved CECONY’s Smart Charge incentive program for off-peak charging. In addition, the NYSPSC is reviewing a proposed incentive program for direct current fast charging stations to assist publically accessible station owners with operational costs.
In December 2018, the NYSPSC issued an order establishing an energy storage goal of up to 3,000 MW of energy storage by 2030 with an interim objective of 1,500 MW by 2025. In December 2018, the NYPSC issued an order requiring CECONY to file an implementation plan for a competitive procurement process to deploy 300 MW of energy storage while O&R and the other electric utilities must plan to deploy 10 MW each.
Also in December 2018, the NYSPSC issued an energy efficiency order intended to double utility energy efficiency programs between 2019 and 2025 to achieve a statewide reduction of 185 TBtu (trillion British thermal units) of energy by 2025 with utilities to achieve a statewide energy reduction of 31 TBtu by 2025. The NYSPSC also required a separate target of at least five TBtu reduction through development of a targeted heat pump program to be developed by the utilities.
The REV proceeding and the various related proceedings are continuing proceedings. The Companies are not able to predict the outcome of the proceedings or their impact.


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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



Rate Plans
Investor-owned utilities in the United States provide delivery service to customers according to the terms of tariffs approved by the appropriate state utility regulator. The tariffs include schedules of rates for service that limit the rates charged by the utilities to amounts that the utilities recover from their customers costs approved by the regulator, including capital costs, of providing service to customers as defined by the tariff. The tariffs implement rate plans adopted by state utility regulators in rate orders issued at the conclusion of rate proceedings. The utilities’ earnings depend on the limits on rates authorized in, and the other provisions of, their rate plans and their ability to operate their businesses in a manner consistent with such rate plans.
The utilities’ rate plans cover specified periods, but rates determined pursuant to a plan generally continue in effect until a new rate plan is approved by the state utility regulator. In New York, either the utility or the NYSPSC can commence a proceeding for a new rate plan, and a new rate plan filed by the utility will generally take effect automatically in approximately 11 months unless prior to such time the NYSPSC approves a rate plan.
In each rate proceeding, rates are determined by the state utility regulator following the submission by the utility of testimony and supporting information, which are subject to review by the staff of the regulator. Other parties with an interest in the proceeding can also review the utility’s proposal and become involved in the rate proceeding. In New York State, the review process is overseen by an administrative law judge who is employed by the NYSPSC. After an administrative law judge issues a recommended decision that generally considers the interests of the utility, the regulatory staff, other parties and legal requisites, the regulator will issue a rate order. The utility and the regulator’s staff and interested parties may enter jointly into a proposed settlement agreement prior to the completion of this administrative process, in which case the agreement could be approved by the regulator with or without modification.
For each rate plan, the revenues needed to provide the utility a return on invested capital is determined by multiplying the utilities’ rate base by the pre-tax weighted average cost of capital determined in the rate plan. In general, rate base, as reflected in a utility's rate plans, is the sum of the utility’s net plant, working capital and certain regulatory assets less deferred taxes and certain regulatory liabilities. The NYSPSC uses a forecast of the average rate base for the year that new rates would be in effect (rate year). The NJBPU uses the rate base balances that exist at the end of the historical 12-month period on which base rates are set. The capital structure used in the weighted average cost of capital is determined using actual and forecast data for the same time periods as rate base. The costs of long-term debt, customer deposits and the allowed return on common equity represent a combination of actual and forecast financing information. The allowed return on common equity is determined by each state’s respective utility regulator. The NYSPSC’s current methodology for determining the allowed return on common equity assigns a one-third weight to an estimate determined from a capital asset pricing model applied to a peer group of utility companies and a two-thirds weight to an estimate determined from a dividend discount model using stock prices and dividend forecasts for a peer group of utility companies. Both methodologies employ market measurements of equity capital to estimate returns rather than the accounting measurements to which such estimates are applied in setting rates.
Pursuant to the Utilities’ rate plans, there generally can be no change to the rates charged to customers during the respective terms of the rate plans other than specified adjustments provided for in the rate plans.
For information about the Utilities’ rate plans, see Note B to the financial statements in Item 8.

Liability for Service Interruptions
The tariff provisions under which CECONY provides electric, gas and steam service, and O&R provides electric and gas service, limit each company’s liability to pay for damages resulting from service interruptions to circumstances resulting from its gross negligence or willful misconduct. Under RECO's tariff provisions for electric service, the company is not liable for interruptions that are due to causes beyond its control.
CECONY’s tariff for electric service also provides for reimbursement to electric customers for spoilage losses resulting from service interruptions in certain circumstances. In general, the company is obligated to reimburse affected residential and commercial customers for food spoilage of up to approximately $500 and $10,000, respectively, and reimburse affected residential customers for prescription medicine spoilage losses without limitation on amount per claim. The company’s maximum aggregate liability for such reimbursement for an incident is $15 million. The company is not required to provide reimbursement to electric customers for outages attributable to generation or transmission system facilities or events beyond its control, such as storms, provided the company makes reasonable efforts to restore service as soon as practicable.

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New York electric utilities are required to provide credits to customers who are without electric service for more than three days. The credit to a customer would equal the portion of the monthly customer charge attributable to the period the customer was without service. If an extraordinary event occurs, the NYSPSC may direct New York gas utilities to implement the same policies.

The NYSPSC has approved a scorecard for use as a guide to assess electric utility performance in restoring electric service during outages that result from a major storm. The scorecard, which could also be applied by the NYSPSC for other outages or actions, was developed to work with the penalty and emergency response plan provisions of the New York Public Service Law. The scorecard includes performance metrics in categories for preparation, operations response and communications.
Each New York electric utility is required to submit to the NYSPSC annually an emergency response plan for the reasonably prompt restoration of service in the case of widespread outages in the utility’s service territory due to storms or other events beyond the control of the utility. If, after evidentiary hearings or other investigatory proceedings, the NYSPSC finds that the utility failed to implement its plan reasonably, the NYSPSC may deny recovery of any part of the service restoration costs caused by such failure. In March 2017, the NYSPSC approved emergency response plans submitted by CECONY and O&R, subject to certain modifications. In December 2017 and 2018, CECONY and O&R, respectively, submitted updated plans.

Generic Proceedings
The NYSPSC from time to time conducts “generic” proceedings to consider issues relating to all electric and gas utilities operating in New York State. Proceedings include the REV proceeding and related proceedings, discussed above, and proceedings relating to data access, retail access, utility staffing levels, and energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. The Utilities are typically active participants in such proceedings.

Federal Utility Regulation
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), among other things, regulates the transmission and wholesale sales of electricity in interstate commerce and the transmission and sale of natural gas for resale in interstate commerce. In addition, the FERC has the authority to impose penalties, which could be substantial, including penalties for the violation of reliability and cyber security rules. Certain activities of the Utilities, the Clean Energy Businesses and Con Edison Transmission are subject to the jurisdiction of the FERC. The Utilities are subject to regulation by the FERC with respect to electric transmission rates and to regulation by the NYSPSC with respect to electric and gas retail commodity sales and local delivery service. As a matter of practice, the NYSPSC has approved delivery service rates for the Utilities that include both transmission and distribution costs. Wholesale energy and capacity products sold by the Clean Energy Businesses to the regional electric markets are subject to FERC jurisdiction as defined by the independent system operator tariffs. The electric and gas transmission projects in which CET Electric and CET Gas invest are also subject to regulation by the FERC. See “Con Edison Transmission,” below.

New York Independent System Operator (NYISO)
The NYISO is a not-for-profit organization that controls and directs the operation of most of the electric transmission facilities in New York State, including those of the Utilities, as an integrated system. It also administers wholesale markets for electricity in New York State and facilitates the construction of new transmission it considers necessary to meet identified reliability, economic or public policy needs. The New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC) promulgates reliability standards subject to FERC oversight, and the NYISO has agreed to comply with those standards. Pursuant to a requirement that is set annually by the NYSRC, the NYISO requires that entities supplying electricity to customers in New York State have generating capacity (owned, procured through the NYISO capacity markets or contracted for) in an amount equal to the peak demand of their customers plus the applicable reserve margin. In addition, the NYISO has determined that entities that serve customers in New York City must procure sufficient capacity from resources that are electrically located in New York City to cover a substantial percentage of the peak demands of their New York City customers. It also requires entities that serve customers in the Lower Hudson Valley and New York City customers that are served through the Lower Hudson Valley to procure sufficient capacity from resources electrically located in the Lower Hudson Valley. These requirements apply both to regulated utilities such as CECONY and O&R for the customers they supply under regulated tariffs and to other load serving entities that supply customers on market terms. To address the possibility of a disruption due to the unavailability of gas, there are certain generating units located in New York City that use oil as fuel for certain periods and the NYISO requires new generating units located in New York City to have dual fuel capability. RECO, O&R’s New Jersey subsidiary, provides electric service in a portion of its service territory that has a different independent system operator – PJM Interconnection LLC (PJM). See “CECONY – Electric Operations – Electric Supply” and “O&R – Electric Operations – Electric Supply,” below.

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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018




Competition
The subset of DERs that produce electricity are collectively referred to as distributed generation (DG). DG includes solar energy production facilities, fuel cells and micro-turbines, and provide an alternative source of electricity for the Utilities’ electric delivery customers. Typically, customers with DG remain connected to the utility’s delivery system and pay a different rate. Gas delivery customers have electricity and oil as alternatives, and steam customers have electricity and natural gas as alternative sources for heating and cooling their buildings. Micro-grids and community-based micro-grids enable distributed generation to serve multiple locations and multiple customers. Other DERs, such as energy storage, demand reduction and energy efficiency investments, provide ways for the energy consumers within the Utilities’ service areas to manage their energy usage. The following table shows the aggregate capacities of the DG projects connected to the Utilities’ distribution systems at the end of the last five years:
Technology
CECONY
O&R
Total MW, except project number
2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Internal-combustion engines
101

103

104

108

110

1

1

2

2

2

Photovoltaic solar
58

95

135

178

226

28

46

63

75

96

Gas turbines
40

40

40

48

48

20

20

20

20

20

Micro turbines
9

10

10

14

17

1

1

1

1

1

Fuel cells
8

8

9

12

13






Steam turbines
3

3

4

6

6






Landfill





2

2

2

2

2

Total distribution-level DG
219

259

302

366

420

52

70

88

100

121

Number of DG projects
4,200

7,451

12,928

18,090

23,942

1,877

3,718

5,409

6,537

7,566

The Clean Energy Businesses participate in competitive renewable and energy infrastructure projects and provide energy-relateed products and services that are subject to different risks than those found in the businesses of the Utilities. See "Clean Energy Businesses," below. Con Edison Transmission invests in electric and gas transmission and gas storage projects, the current and prospective customers of which may have competitive alternatives.

The Utilities do not consider it reasonably likely that another company would be authorized to provide utility delivery service of electricity, natural gas or steam where the company already provides service. Any such other company would need to obtain NYSPSC consent, satisfy applicable local requirements, install facilities to provide the service, meet applicable services standards and charge customers comparable taxes and other fees and costs imposed on the service. A new delivery company would also be subject to extensive ongoing regulation by the NYSPSC. See “Utility Regulation – State Utility Regulation – Regulators,” above.

The Utilities
CECONY
CECONY, incorporated in New York State in 1884, is a subsidiary of Con Edison and has no significant subsidiaries of its own. Its principal business segments are its regulated electric, gas and steam businesses.
For a discussion of the company’s operating revenues and operating income for each segment, see “Results of Operations” in Item 7. For additional information about the segments, see Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Electric Operations
Electric Facilities
CECONY’s capitalized costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, for distribution facilities were $18,716 million and $17,996 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively. For its transmission facilities, the costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, were $3,106 million and $2,990 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively, and for its portion of the steam-electric generation facilities, the costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, were $592 million and $544 million , at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively. See "CECONY – Steam Operations – Steam Facilities," below.
Distribution Facilities
CECONY owns 62 area distribution substations and various distribution facilities located throughout New York City and Westchester County. At December 31, 2018 , the company’s distribution system had a transformer capacity of 32,653 MVA, with 37,049 miles of overhead distribution lines and 97,607 miles of underground distribution lines.

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The underground distribution lines represent the single longest underground electric delivery system in the United States.

Transmission Facilities
The company’s transmission facilities are located in New York City and Westchester, Orange, Rockland, Putnam and Dutchess counties in New York State. At December 31, 2018 , CECONY owned or jointly owned 555 miles of overhead circuits operating at 138, 230, 345 and 500 kV and 749 miles of underground circuits operating at 69, 138 and 345 kV. The company’s 39 transmission substations and 62 area stations are supplied by circuits operated at 69 kV and above. For information about transmission projects to address, among other things, reliability concerns associated with the scheduled closure of the Indian Point Energy Center (which is owned by Entergy Corporation subsidiaries) see “CECONY – Electric Operations – Electric Supply” and “Con Edison Transmission,” below. CECONY’s transmission facilities interconnect with those of National Grid, Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, O&R, New York State Electric & Gas, Connecticut Light & Power Company, Long Island Power Authority, NYPA and Public Service Electric and Gas Company.

Generating Facilities 
CECONY’s electric generating facilities consist of plants located in Manhattan whose primary purpose is to produce steam for the company's steam business. The facilities have an aggregate capacity of 720 MW. The company expects to have sufficient amounts of gas and fuel oil available in 2019 for use in these facilities.

Electric Sales and Deliveries
CECONY delivers electricity to its full-service customers who purchase electricity from the company. The company also delivers electricity to its customers who choose to purchase electricity from other suppliers (retail choice program). In addition, the company delivers electricity to state and municipal customers of NYPA.
The company charges all customers in its service area for the delivery of electricity. The company generally recovers, on a current basis, the cost of the electricity that it buys and then sells to its full-service customers. It does not make any margin or profit on the electricity it sells. CECONY’s electric revenues are subject to a revenue decoupling mechanism. As a result, its electric delivery revenues are generally not affected by changes in delivery volumes from levels assumed when rates were approved. CECONY’s electric sales and deliveries for the last five years were:
  
 
Year Ended December 31,
  
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
 
2018
Electric Energy Delivered (millions of kWh)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CECONY full service customers
 
19,757
 
20,206
 
19,886
 
19,227
 
20,452
Delivery service for retail choice customers
 
26,221
 
26,662
 
26,813
 
26,136
 
26,266
Delivery service to NYPA customers and others
 
10,325
 
10,147
 
10,046
 
9,955
 
10,119
Total Deliveries in Franchise Area
 
56,303
 
57,015
 
56,745
 
55,318

56,837
Electric Energy Delivered ($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CECONY full service customers
 
$5,023
 
$4,757
 
$4,404
 
$4,348
 
$4,706
Delivery service for retail choice customers
 
2,646
 
2,714
 
2,768
 
2,712
 
2,624
Delivery service to NYPA customers and others
 
625
 
600
 
610
 
623
 
652
Other operating revenues
 
143
 
101
 
324
 
289
 
(11)
Total Deliveries in Franchise Area
 
$8,437
 
$8,172
 
$8,106
 
$7,972

$7,971
Average Revenue per kWh Sold (Cents)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Residential
 
28.9
 
26.3
 
24.9
 
25.3
 
26.4
Commercial and industrial
 
22.1
 
20.6
 
19.1
 
19.7
 
19.3

For further discussion of the company’s electric operating revenues and its electric results, see “Results of Operations” in Item 7. For additional segment information, see Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Electric Peak Demand
The electric peak demand in CECONY’s service area occurs during the summer air conditioning season. The weather during the summer of 2018 was cooler than design weather conditions. CECONY’s 2018 service area peak demand was 12,686 MW, which occurred on August 29, 2018. “Design weather conditions” for the electric system is a standard to which the actual peak demand is adjusted for evaluation and planning purposes. Since NYISO-

22
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



invoked demand reduction programs can be called upon under specific circumstances, design weather conditions do not include these programs’ potential impact. However, the CECONY forecasted peak demand at design conditions does include the impact of certain demand reduction programs. The company estimates that, under design weather conditions, the 2019 service area peak demand wil l b e 13,270 MW. The company forecasts an average annual growth in electric peak demand in its service area at design weather conditions over the next five years to be approximately 0.1 percent per year.

Electric Supply
Most of the electricity sold by CECONY to its full-service customers in 2018 was purchased under firm power contracts or through the wholesale electricity market administered by the NYISO. The company expects that these resources will again be adequate to meet the requirements of its customers in 2019 . The company plans to meet its continuing obligation to supply electricity to its customers through a combination of electricity purchased under contracts, purchased through the NYISO’s wholesale electricity market, or generated from its electricity generating facilities. For information about the company’s contracts for electric generating capacity, see Notes I and O to the financial statements in Item 8. To reduce the volatility of its customers’ electric energy costs, the company has contracts to purchase electric energy and enters into derivative transactions to hedge the costs of a portion of its expected purchases under these contracts and through the NYISO’s wholesale electricity market.
CECONY owns generating stations in New York City associated primarily with its steam system. As of December 31, 2018 , the generating stations had a combined electric capacity of approximately 720 MW, base d on 2018 summer test ratings. For information about electric generating capacity owned by the company, see “Electric Operations – Electric Facilities – Generating Facilities,” above.
In general, the Utilities recover their costs of purchasing power costs for full service customers, including the cost of hedging purchase prices, pursuant to rate provisions approved by the state public utility regulatory authority having jurisdiction. See “Financial and Commodity Market Risks – Commodity Price Risk” in Item 7 and “Recoverable Energy Costs” in Note A to the financial statements in Item 8. From time to time, certain parties have petitioned the NYSPSC to review these provisions, the elimination of which could have a material adverse effect on the Companies’ financial position, results of operations or liquidity.
CECONY monitors the adequacy of the electric capacity resources and related developments in its service area, and works with other parties on long-term resource adequacy within the framework of the NYISO. In addition, the NYISO has adopted reliability rules that include obligations on transmission owners (such as CECONY) to construct facilities that may be needed for system reliability if the market does not solve a reliability need identified by the NYISO. See “New York Independent System Operator,” above. In a July 1998 order, the NYSPSC indicated that it “agree(s) generally that CECONY need not plan on constructing new generation as the competitive market develops,” but considers “overly broad” and did not adopt CECONY’s request for a declaration that, solely with respect to providing generating capacity, it will no longer be required to engage in long-range planning to meet potential demand and, in particular, that it will no longer have the obligation to construct new generating facilities, regardless of the market price of capacity.
In November 2012, the NYSPSC directed CECONY to work with NYPA to develop a contingency plan to address reliability concerns associated with the potential closure of the nuclear power plant at the Indian Point Energy Center (which is owned by Entergy Corporation subsidiaries). In January 2017, New York State officials announced that, under an agreement reached with Entergy, one of the two nuclear reactors at Indian Point is scheduled to shut down by April 2020, while the other is scheduled to be closed a year later. In December 2017, the NYISO indicated that the two units may be retired on or after these dates. The NYISO also indicated that over its ten-year planning period, through 2027, there is no anticipated reliability need if three expected units finalize construction and enter service. Two of the units, Bayonne Energy Center II Uprate (Zone J, 120 MW) and CPV Valley Energy Center (Zone G, 678 MW) entered service in 2018 (with the latter in litigation regarding its air permit) and the other unit, Cricket Valley Energy Center (Zone G, 1,020 MW), is under construction and has a 2020 target in-service date. In December 2018, the NYSPSC directed CECONY to work with the NYSPSC staff and others to develop a contingency plan to address reliability concerns associated with the potential retirement of fossil-fueled electric generating units that are owned by others and generally used for meeting periods of high electric demand or for local reliability purposes.



CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
23



Gas Operations
Gas Facilities
CECONY’s capitalized costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, for gas facilities, which are primarily distribution facilities, were $7,107 million and $6,403 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively.

Natural gas is delivered by pipeline to CECONY at various points in or near its service territory and is distributed to customers by the company through an estimated 4,416 miles of mains and 375,898 service lines. The company owns a natural gas liquefaction facility and storage tank at its Astoria property in Queens, New York. The plant can store 1,062 MDt of which a maximum of about 240 MDt can be withdrawn per day. The company has about 1,226 MDt of additional natural gas storage capacity at a field in upstate New York, owned and operated by Honeoye Storage Corporation, a corporatio n 71.2 percent owned by CET Gas and 28.8 percent owned by CECONY.

Gas Sales and Deliveries
The company generally recovers the cost of the gas that it buys and then sells to its full-service customers. It does not make any margin or profit on the gas it sells. CECONY’s gas revenues are subject to a weather normalization clause and a revenue decoupling mechanism. As a result, its gas delivery revenues are generally not affected by changes in delivery volumes from levels assumed when rates were approved. CECONY’s gas sales and deliveries for the last five years were:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014

2015
2016

2017

2018

Gas Delivered (MDt)
 
 
 
 
 
Firm sales
 
 
 
 
 
Full service
75,630
77,197
75,892
83,005
92,305
Firm transportation of customer-owned gas
68,731
72,864
68,442
71,353
82,472
Total Firm Sales
144,361
150,061
144,334
154,358
174,777
Interruptible sales (a)
10,498
6,332
8,957
7,553
7,351
Total Gas Delivered to CECONY Customers
154,859
156,393
153,291
161,911
182,128
Transportation of customer-owned gas
 
 
 
 
 
NYPA
47,548
44,038
43,101
37,033
34,079
Other (mainly generating plants and interruptible transportation)
105,012
104,857
109,000
83,117
93,346
Off-system sales
15
389

55
195
Total Sales
307,434
305,677
305,392
282,116
309,748
Gas Delivered  ($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Firm sales
 
 
 
 
 
Full service
$1,141
$956
$933
$1,136
$1,356
Firm transportation of customer-owned gas
453
458
426
524
595
Total Firm Sales
1,594
1,414
1,359
1,660
1,951
Interruptible sales
91
46
34
35
40
Total Gas Delivered to CECONY Customers
1,685
1,460
1,393
1,695
1,991
Transportation of customer-owned gas
 
 
 
NYPA
2
2
2
2
2
Other (mainly generating plants and interruptible transportation)
70
54
57
56
57
Off-system sales

1



Other operating revenues (mainly regulatory amortizations)
(36)
11
56
148
28
Total Sales
$1,721
$1,528
$1,508
$1,901
$2,078
Average Revenue per Dt Sold
 
 
 
Residential
$16.76
$13.91
$13.96
$15.35
$16.71
General
$12.38
$9.73
$9.47
$10.86
$11.31
(a)
Includes 6,057, 1,229, 4,708, 3,816, and 3,326 MDt for 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018, respectively, which are also reflected in firm transportation and other.
For further discussion of the company’s gas operating revenues and its gas results, see “Results of Operations” in Item 7. For additional segment information, see Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.


24
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



Gas Peak Demand
The gas peak demand for firm sales customers in CECONY’s service area occurs during the winter heating season. The peak day demand during the winter 2018 / 2019 (through January 31, 2019) occurred on January 21, 2019 when the demand reached approximately 1,400 MDt. “Design weather conditions” for the gas system is a standard to which the actual peak demand is adjusted for evaluation and planning purposes. The company estimates that, under design weather conditions, the 2019 / 2020 service area peak day demand will be 1,645 MDt. The forecasted peak day demand at design conditions does not include gas used by interruptible gas customers including electric and steam generating stations. As of January 2019, the company forecasts an average annual growth of the gas peak demand over the next five years at design conditions to be approximately 1.0 percent in its service area, including the effect of the temporary moratorium described below.

In September 2017, CECONY submitted a petition to the NYSPSC for authority to develop smart solutions for gas customers, such as expanding energy efficiency and demand response programs, and to develop a program to encourage ground and air source heating alternatives. The company also identified a gas pipeline need as a result of strong growth in gas consumption, driven by the City of New York’s clean heat program and customers in general converting to natural gas. In July 2018, the NYSPSC issued an order that authorizes CECONY to expand its energy efficiency programs for gas customers. In August 2018, the NYSPSC issued an order approving, with modifications, CECONY’s gas demand response pilot program, including a three-year budget of $5.1 million. In September 2018, CECONY requested NYSPSC approval of a six-year $305 million budget for a portfolio of proposed non-pipeline gas projects including targeted energy efficiency and heating electrification measures, three renewable gas production plants and two to five gas storage facilities in Westchester County. In February 2019, the NYSPSC issued an order that approves the company’s budget for non-pipeline gas projects related to energy efficiency and heating electrification ($222.6 million) and stated the company should pursue or seek cost recovery for the other solutions through existing mechanisms.

In January 2019, due to gas supply constraints, the company filed notice with the NYSPSC to establish a temporary moratorium beginning in March 2019 on new applications for firm gas service in most of Westchester County. Also, in January 2019, the NYSPSC Chair announced that its staff will lead a review of the changing market conditions that gave rise to CECONY’s decision to establish the temporary moratorium and to issue a report by July 2019 considering, among other things, economic development and the state’s transition to clean energy sources. In February 2019, the NYSPSC staff commenced the moratorium investigation.
 
Gas Supply
CECONY and O&R have combined their gas requirements, and contracts to meet those requirements, into a single portfolio. The combined portfolio is administered by, and related management services are provided by, CECONY (for itself and as agent for O&R) and costs are allocated between the Utilities in accordance with provisions approved by the NYSPSC. See Note S to the financial statements in Item 8.
Charges fr om suppliers for the firm purchase of gas, which are based on formulas or indexes or are subject to negotiation, are generally designed to approximate market prices. The Utilities have contracts with interstate pipeline companies for the purchase of firm transportation from upstream points where gas has been purchased to the Utilities’ distribution systems, and for upstream storage services. Charges under these transportation and storage contracts are approved by the FERC. The Utilities are required to pay certain fixed charges under the supply, transportation and storage contracts whether or not the contracted capacity is actually used. These fixed charges amounted to approximately $302 million in 2018 , including $263 million for CECONY. See “Contractual Obligations,” below. At December 31, 2018, the contracts were for various terms extending to 2020 for supply and 2039 for transportation and storage. During 2018, CECONY entered into one new transportation contract. In addition, the Utilities purchase gas on the spot market and contract for interruptible gas transportation. See “Recoverable Energy Costs” in Note A , Note P and Note S to the financial statements in Item 8.

Steam Operations
Steam Facilities
CECONY’s capitalized costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, for steam facilities, including steam's portion of the steam-electric generation facilities, were $1,830 million and $1,798 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively. See "CECONY – Electric Operations – Electric Facilities," above.
CECONY generates steam at one steam-electric generating station and four steam-only generating stations and distributes steam to its customers through approximately 104 miles of transmission, distribution and service piping.



CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
25




Steam Sales and Deliveries
CECONY’s steam sales and deliveries for the last five years were:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Steam Sold (MMlb)
 
 
 
 
 
General
594
538
465
490
593
Apartment house
6,574
6,272
5,792
5,754
6,358
Annual power
15,848
15,109
13,722
13,166
14,811
Total Steam Delivered to CECONY Customers
23,016
21,919
19,979
19,410
21,762
Steam Sold ($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
General
$30
$29
$23
$26
$30
Apartment house
180
176
148
158
174
Annual power
469
453
378
392
441
Other operating revenues
(51)
(29)
2
19
(14)
Total Steam Delivered to CECONY Customers
$628
$629
$551
$595
$631
Average Revenue per Mlb Sold
$29.50
$30.02
$27.48
$29.68
$29.64
For further discussion of the company’s steam operating revenues and its steam results, see “Results of Operations” in Item 7. For additional segment information, see Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Steam Peak Demand and Capacity
Demand for steam in CECONY’s service area peaks during the winter heating season. The one-hour peak demand during the winter of 2018 / 2019 (through January 31, 2019) occurred on January 31, 2019 when the demand reached approximately 8 .4 MMlb per hour. “Design weather conditions” for the steam system is a standard to which the actual peak demand is adjusted for evaluation and planning purposes. The company’s estimate for the winter of 2019 / 2020 peak demand of its steam customers is abou t 8.9 MMlb per hour under design weather conditions. As of January 2019, the company forecasts an average annual decrease in steam peak demand in its service area at design weather conditions over the next five years to be approximately 0.5 percent.
On December 31, 2018 , the steam system was capable of delivering approximately 11.4 MMlb of steam per hour, and CECONY estimates that the system w ill have the same capability in the 2019 / 2020 winter.

Steam Supply
40 percent of the steam produced by CECONY in 2018 was supplied by the company’s steam-only generating assets; 42 percent was produced by the company’s steam-electric generating assets, where steam and electricity are primarily cogenerated; and 18 pe rcent was purchased under an agreement with Brooklyn Navy Yard Cogeneration Partners L.P.

O&R
Electric Operations
Electric Facilities
O&R’s capitalized costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, for distribution facilities were $1,034 million and $963 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively. For its transmission facilities, the costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation, were $227 million and $220 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively.
O&R and RECO own, in whole or in part, transmission and distribution facilities which include 549 circuit miles of transmission lines, 15 transmission substations, 63 distribution substations, 88,545 in-service line transformers, 3,748 pole miles of overhead distribution lines and 2,181 miles of underground distribution lines. O&R’s transmission system is part of the NYISO system except that portions of RECO’s system are located within the transmission area controlled by PJM.

Electric Sales and Deliveries
O&R delivers electricity to its full-service customers who purchase electricity from the company. The company also delivers electricity to its customers who purchase electricity from other suppliers through the company’s retail choice program.

26
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



The company charges all customers in its service area for the delivery of electricity. O&R generally recovers, on a current basis, the cost of the electricity that it buys and then sells to its full-service customers. It does not make any margin or profit on the electricity it sells. O&R’s New York electric revenues (which accounted for 76 percent of O&R’s electric revenues in 2018) are subject to a revenue decoupling mechanism. As a result, O&R’s New York electric delivery revenues are generally not affected by changes in delivery volumes from levels assumed when rates were approved. O&R’s electric sales in New Jersey are not subject to a decoupling mechanism. O&R’s electric sales and deliveries for the last five years were:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Electric Energy Delivered (millions of kWh)
 
 
 
 
 
Total deliveries to O&R full service customers
2,429
2,499
2,555
2,435
2,643
Delivery service for retail choice customers
3,240
3,237
3,180
2,976
2,974
Total Deliveries In Franchise Area
5,669
5,736
5,735
5,411
5,617
Electric Energy Delivered ($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Total deliveries to O&R full service customers
$455
$441
$426
$433
$453
Delivery service for retail choice customers
207
213
213
201
201
Other operating revenues
18
9
(2)
8
(12)
Total Deliveries In Franchise Area
$680
$663
$637
$642
$642
Average Revenue Per kWh Sold (Cents)
 
 
 
 
 
Residential
20.3
19.2
18.4
19.8
19.1
Commercial and Industrial
16.8
15.4
14.3
15.0
14.4
For further discussion of the company’s electric operating revenues and its electric results, see “Results of Operations” in Item 7. For additional segment information, see Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Electric Peak Demand
The electric peak demand in O&R’s service area occurs during the summer air conditioning season. The weather during the summer of 2018 was cooler than design conditions. O&R’s 2018 service area peak demand was 1,470 MW, which occurred o n July 2, 2018. “Design weather” for the electric system is a standard to which the actual peak demand is adjusted for evaluation and planning purposes. Since the NYISO can invoke demand reduction programs under specific circumstances, design conditions do not include these programs’ potential impact. However, the O&R forecasted peak demand at design conditions does include the impact of certain demand reduction programs. The company estimates that, under design weather conditions, the 2019 service area peak demand will be 1,585 MW. The company forecasts an average annual decrease in electric peak demand in its service area at design conditions over the next five years to be approximately 0.3 percent .

Electric Supply
The electricity O&R sold to its full-service customers in 2018 was purchased under firm power contracts or through the wholesale electricity market. The company expects that these resources will again be adequate to meet the requirements of its customers in 2019 . O&R does not own any electric generating capacity. The company plans to meet its continuing obligation to supply electricity to its customers through a combination of electricity purchased under contracts or purchased through the wholesale electricity market. To reduce the volatility of its customers’ electric energy costs, the company has contracts to purchase electric energy and enters into derivative transactions to hedge the costs of a portion of its expected purchases. For information about the company’s contracts, see Note O to the financial statements in Item 8.
In general, the Utilities recover their costs of purchasing power for full service customers, including the cost of hedging purchase prices, pursuant to rate provisions approved by the state public utility regulatory authority having jurisdiction. See “Financial and Commodity Market Risks – Commodity Price Risk,” in Item 7 and “Recoverable Energy Costs” in Note A to the financial statements in Item 8. From time to time, certain parties have petitioned the NYSPSC to review these provisions, the elimination of which could have a material adverse effect on the Companies’ financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

Gas Operations
Gas Facilities

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
27


O&R’s capitalized costs for utility plant, net of accumulated depreciation for gas facilities, which are primarily distribution facilities, were $607 million and $573 million at December 31, 2018 and 2017 , respectively. Natural gas is delivered by pipeline to O&R at various points in or near its service territory and is distributed to customers by the company through an estimated 1,881 miles of mains and 105,496 service lines.

Gas Sales and Deliveries
O&R generally recovers the cost of the gas that it buys and then sells to its full-service customers. It does not make any margin or profit on the gas it sells. O&R’s gas revenues are subject to a weather normalization clause. O&R’s New York gas revenues (which have accounted for substantially all of O&R’s gas revenues) are subject to a revenue decoupling mechanism. As a result, its gas delivery revenues are generally not affected by changes in delivery volumes from levels assumed when rates were approved. O&R’s gas sales and deliveries for the last five years were:
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Gas Delivered (MDt)
 
 
 
 
 
Firm sales
 
 
 
 
 
Full service
9,529
9,348
9,723
10,480
12,050
Firm transportation
12,592
11,752
10,381
9,873
9,950
Total Firm Sales
22,121
21,100
20,104
20,353
22,000
Interruptible sales
4,216
4,205
3,853
3,771
3,746
Total Gas Delivered to O&R Customers
26,337
25,305
23,957
24,124
25,746
Transportation of customer-owned gas
 
 
 
 
 
Sales for resale
945
906
867
896
959
Sales to electric generating stations
70
25
18
9
1
Off-system sales
3
62
16
6
15
Total Sales
27,355
26,298
24,858
25,035
26,721
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2014
2015

2016

2017

2018

Gas Delivered ($ in millions)
 
 
 
 
 
Firm sales
 
 
 
 
 
Full service
$121
$91
$99
$139
$166
Firm transportation
75
68
70
74
78
Total Firm Sales
196
159
169
213
244
Interruptible Sales
2
3
3
7
6
Total Gas Delivered to O&R Customers
198
162
172
220
250
Transportation of customer-owned gas
 
 
 
 
 
Sales to electric generating stations
1




Other operating revenues
13
20
12
12
(1)
Total Sales
$212
$182
$184
$232
$249
Average Revenue Per Dt Sold
 
 
 
 
 
Residential
$13.01
$10.11
$10.71
$13.86
$14.22
General
$11.30
$8.24
$8.17
$11.08
$11.80
For further discussion of the company’s gas operating revenues and its gas results, see “Results of Operations” in Item 7. For additional segment information, see Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Gas Peak Demand
The gas peak demand for firm sales customers in O&R’s service area occurs during the winter heating season. The peak day demand during the winter 2018 / 2019 (through January 31, 2019) occurred on January 21, 2019 when the demand reached approximately 217 MDt. “Design Weather” for the gas system is a standard to which the actual peak demand is adjusted for evaluation and planning purposes. The company estimates that, under design weather conditions, the 2019 / 2020 service area peak day demand will be 228 MDt. The forecasted peak day demand at design conditions does not include gas used by interruptible gas customers including electric generating stations. The company forecasts an average annual growth of the gas peak demand over the next five years at design conditions to be approximately 0.6  percent in its service area.

28
CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018




Gas Supply
O&R and CECONY have combined their gas requirements and purchase contracts to meet those requirements into a single portfolio. See “CECONY – Gas Operations – Gas Supply” above.


CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
29


Clean Energy Businesses

The following table provides information about the Clean Energy Businesses' renewable electric production projects that are in operation and/or in construction at December 31, 2018 :
Project Name
Generating
Capacity (a)
(MW AC)
Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) Term (In Years) (b)
Actual/Expected
In-Service Date (c)
Location
(State)
PPA Counterparty (d)
Utility Scale





Solar





Wholly owned projects





 PJM assets
53
(e)
2011/2013
New Jersey/Pennsylvania
Various
 New England assets
24
Various
2011/2017
Massachusetts/Rhode Island
Various
 California Solar (f)
110
25
2012/2013/2018
California
PG&E
 Mesquite Solar 1 (f)
165
20
2013/2018
Arizona
PG&E
 Copper Mountain Solar 2 (f)
150
25
2013/2015/2018
Nevada
PG&E
 Copper Mountain Solar 3 (f)
255
20
2014/2015/2018
Nevada
SCPPA
 California Solar 2 (f)
80
20
2014/2016
California
SCE/PG&E
 Texas Solar 5 (f)
95
25
2015
Texas
City of San Antonio
 Texas Solar 7 (f)
106
25
2016
Texas
City of San Antonio
 California Solar 3 (f)
110
20
2016/2017
California
SCE/PG&E
 Upton Solar (f)
158
25
2017
Texas
City of Austin
 Panoche Valley
140
20
2017/2018
California
SCE
 Copper Mountain Solar 1 (f)
58
12
2018
Nevada
PG&E
 Copper Mountain Solar 4 (h)
94
20
2018
Nevada
SCE
 Mesquite Solar 2 (h)
100
18
2018
Arizona
SCE
 Mesquite Solar 3 (h)
150
23
2018
Arizona
WAPA (Navy)
 Great Valley Solar (h)
200
17
2018
California
MCE/SMUD/PG&E/SCE
 Wistaria Solar (i)
100
20
2018
California
SCE
 Other
6
Various
Various
Various
Various
Jointly owned projects (f) (g)





 Texas Solar 4
32
25
2014
Texas
City of San Antonio
Total Solar
2,186




Wind





Wholly owned projects





 Broken Bow II (f)
75
25
2014
Nebraska
NPPD
 Wind Holdings (f)
180
Various
2014/2015/2018
Various
NWE/Basin Electric
 Adams Rose Wind
23
7
2016
Minnesota
Dairyland
 Coram Wind (f)
102
16
2016
California
PG&E
 Other
22
Various
Various
Various
Various
Total Wind
402




Total MW (AC) in Operation
2,588




Lost Hills Solar
20
(j)
2019
California
MCE
Total MW (AC) in Construction
20




Total MW (AC) Utility Scale
2,608




Behind the Meter





Total MW (AC) in Operation
45




Total MW (AC) in Construction
1




Total MW Behind the Meter
46




(a)
Represents Con Edison Development’s ownership interest in the project.
(b)
Represents Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) contractual term or remaining term from Con Edison Development’s date of acquisition.
(c)
Represents Actual/Expected In-Service Date or Con Edison Development's date of acquisition.
(d)
PPA Counterparties include: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Public Power Authority (SCPPA), Southern California Edison Company (SCE), Western Area Power Administration (WAPA), Marin Clean Energy (MCE), Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD), Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD) and NorthWestern Energy (NWE)
(e)
Solar renewable energy credit hedges are in place, in lieu of PPAs, through 2022.
(f)
Project has been pledged as security for project debt financing. See Con Edison's Consolidated Statement of Capitalization in Item 8.

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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



(g)
Texas Solar 4 is 80 percent owned. See Note Q to the financial statements in Item 8.
(h)
Projects are financed with tax equity.
(i)
Pending California Public Utility Commission approval to sell energy on a contracted basis to SCE
(j)
Solar renewable energy hedges in place through 2019.

Con Edison Development
Con Edison Development develops, owns and operates renewable and energy infrastructure projects. In December 2018, a Con Edison Development subsidiary acquired Sempra Solar Holdings, LLC to expand the company's renewable energy asset portfolio. See Note U to the financial statements in Item 8. The company focuses its efforts on utility scale renewable electric production projects. The output of most of the projects is sold under long-term power purchase agreements (PPA) with utilities and municipalities. The following table shows the generating capacity (MW AC) of Con Edison Development's renewable electric production projects in operation at the end of the last five years:
Generating Capacity (MW AC)
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
Renewable electric production projects
446
748
1,098
1,358
2,588
In January 2019, PG&E filed for reorganization under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The output of Con Edison Development renewable electric production projects with an aggregate of 680 MW (AC) of generating capacity (PG&E Projects) is sold to PG&E under long-term power purchase agreements (PG&E PPAs). At December 31, 2018, Con Edison’s consolidated balance sheet included $885 million of net non-utility plant relating to the PG&E Projects, $1,125 million of intangible assets relating to the PG&E PPAs, $292 million of net non-utility plant of additional projects that secure the related project debt and $1,050 million of related project debt. See "Application of Critical Accounting Policies - Accounting for Long-Lived and Intangible Assets" in Item 7 and “Long-Lived and Intangible Assets” in Note A and "Long-term Debt" in Note C to the financial statements in Item 8.
 
Con Edison Development's renewable electric production volumes generated for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2017, and 2018 were:
  
Millions of kWh Generated
 
For the Years Ended December 31,
Description
2016
2017
2018
Renewable electric production projects
 
 
 
Solar
1,565
2,158
2,680
Wind
651
988
1,074
Total
2,216
3,146
3,754

In May 2017, Con Edison Development sold a development-stage solar electric production project for $11 million. Pursuant to its agreement with the purchaser, the company performed engineering, procurement and construction for the project (which was completed in May 2018). See Note U to the financial statements in Item 8.

Con Edison Energy
Con Edison Energy provides services to manage the dispatch, fuel requirements and risk management activities for 8,041 MW of generating plants and merchant transmission in the northeastern United States owned by unrelated parties and manages energy supply assets leased from others. The company also provides wholesale hedging and risk management services to renewable electric production projects owned by Con Edison Development and Con Edison Solutions.

Con Edison Solutions
Con Edison Solutions provides energy-efficiency services to government and commercial customers. The services include the design and installation of lighting retrofits, high-efficiency heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment and other energy saving technologies. The company is compensated for its services based primarily on the increased energy efficiency of the installed equipment over a multi-year period. Con Edison Solutions has won competitive solicitations for energy savings contracts with the United States Department of Energy and the United States Department of Defense, and a shared energy savings contract with the United States Postal Service. The company also develops, owns and operates behind-the-meter renewable energy projects, predominately in Massachusetts and New York, with an aggregate capacity of 45 MW (AC).
In September 2016, Con Edison Solutions sold its retail electric supply business to a subsidiary of Exelon Corporation for cash consideration of $235 million. In addition, Con Edison received $23 million in cash as a

CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
31


working capital adjustment in February 2017. The retail electric supply business primarily sold electricity to industrial, commercial and governmental customers in the northeastern United States and Texas and also sold electricity to residential and small commercial customers (mass retail market) in the northeastern United States. See Note U to the financial statements in Item 8. Con Edison Solutions’ electricity sales for the last five years were:
 
2014
2015
2016
2017

2018

Retail electric volumes sold (millions of kWh)
11,871
13,594
9,843



For information about the Clean Energy Businesses' results, see "Results of Operations" in Item 7 and Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Con Edison Transmission
CET Electric
CET Electric owns a 45.7 percent interest in New York Transco LLC (NY Transco). Affiliates of certain other New York transmission owners own the remaining interests.
NY Transco's operating projects were approved by the NYSPSC in October 2013 in its proceeding to address potential needs that could arise should the Indian Point Energy Center (which is owned by Entergy Corporation subsidiaries) no longer be able to operate. See Note U to the financial statements in Item 8 and “CECONY – Electric Operations – Electric Supply,” above.
In April 2015, FERC issued an order granting certain transmission incentives for NY Transco projects. In March 2016, the FERC approved a November 2015 settlement agreement that provides, in relation to the projects described above, for a 10 percent return on common equity (and/or 9.5 percent for capital costs in excess of $228 million incurred for initial commercial operation) and a maximum common equity ratio of 53 percent. The costs of the projects are allocated across New York State, with 63 percent to load serving entities in the CECONY and O&R service areas.
In December 2015, the NYSPSC issued an order in its competitive proceeding to select AC transmission projects that would relieve transmission congestion between upstate and downstate. The NYSPSC determined that there was a public policy need for new transmission to address congestion and directed the NYISO, under its FERC-approved public policy planning process, to request developers to submit transmission project proposals for two segments of the transmission system. In December 2018, the NYISO board of directors concluded, subject to its final determination, that the most efficient or cost effective transmission project for one segment of the transmission system is a project that was jointly proposed by National Grid and NY Transco ($600 million estimated cost, excluding certain interconnection costs that are not yet determined) that would increase transmission capacity by 2,100 MW when combined with the selected project to be developed by another developer for the other segment. The NYISO board indicated that following its consideration of comments from the NYISO’s management committee it will make its final determination on the selection of the transmission projects. In November 2017, FERC approved a settlement agreement which would be applicable to the segment proposed by National Grid and NY Transco if it is selected by the NYISO. The settlement agreement provides for a 10.65 percent return on common equity (subject to a cost containment mechanism), a maximum common equity ratio of 53 percent and allocation of costs across New York State (with approximately 84 percent allocated to load serving entities in the CECONY and O&R service areas).

CET Gas
CET Gas, through its subsidiaries, owns a 50 percent interest in Stagecoach Gas Services LLC (Stagecoach), a 71.2 percent interest in Honeoye Storage Corporation (Honeoye) and a 12.5 percent ownership interest in Mountain Valley Pipeline LLC (MVP). Stagecoach is a joint venture with a subsidiary of Crestwood Equity Partners LP (Crestwood) to own, operate and further develop a gas pipeline and storage business located in northern Pennsylvania and southern New York. Stagecoach provides services to its customers (including CECONY, see Note S to the financial statements in Item 8) through its 181 miles of pipe and 41 Bcf of storage capacity. Honeoye, in which CECONY owns the remaining interest, operates a gas storage facility in upstate New York. MVP is a joint venture with four other partners to construct and operate a proposed 300-mile gas transmission project in West Virginia and Virginia. In October 2017, FERC issued a Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity for the Mountain Valley Pipeline. Environmental groups filed a rehearing request with FERC and petitioned the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia for review of the FERC's order issuing the certificate. In June 2018, FERC denied the environmental groups' requests for rehearing. In February 2019, the court issued an order rejecting the arguments raised by the various parties challenging the FERC certificate order and finding that FERC’s approval of the project was reasonable. In February 2019, the Mountain Valley Pipeline’s operator indicated that: as currently de

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CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018



signed, the pipeline is estimated to cost a total of approximately $4,600 million; the pipeline is targeted to be placed in service during the fourth quarter of 2019, subject to litigation and regulatory-related delay;  MVP is currently defending certain agency actions and judicial challenges that must be resolved favorably before the pipeline can be completed; and there are other proceedings that may affect MVP, including an investigation of potential criminal and/or civil violations of the Clean Water Act and other federal statutes as they relate to the construction of the pipeline. See Note S and Note U to the financial statements in Item 8.

For information about Con Edison Transmission's results, see "Results of Operations" in Item 7 and Note N to the financial statements in Item 8.

Capital Requirements and Resources
Capital Requirements
The following table contains the Companies’ capital requirements for the years 2016 through 2018 and their current estimate of amounts for 2019 through 2021 :
  
Actual
Estimate
(Millions of Dollars)
2016
2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

CECONY (a)(b)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Electric
$1,819
$1,905
$1,861
$1,871
$2,347
$2,489
Gas
811
909
1,050
1,049
1,113
1,100
Steam
126
90
94
96
89
82
Sub-total
2,756
2,904
3,005
3,016
3,549
3,671
O&R
 
 
 
 
 
 
Electric
114
128
138
155
169
145
Gas
52
61
67
56
56
52
Sub-total
166
189
205
211
225
197
Con Edison Transmission
 
 
 
 
 
 
CET Electric
51





CET Gas
1,027
66
248
200


Sub-total
1,078
66
248
200


Clean Energy Businesses
1,235
447
1,791
200
400
400
Total capital expenditures
5,235
3,606
5,249
3,627
4,174
4,268
Retirement of long-term securities
 
 
 
 
 
 
Con Edison – parent company
2
402
2
3
403
503
CECONY
650

1,836
475
350
640
O&R
79
4
55
62


Clean Energy Businesses
4
28
45
110
113
117
Total retirement of long-term securities
735
434
1,938
650
866
1,260
Total capital requirements
$5,970
$4,040
$7,187
$4,277
$5,040
$5,528
(a)
CECONY’s capital expenditures for environmental protection facilities and related studies were $259 million, $381 million and $490 million in 2016 , 2017 and 2018 , respectively, and are estimated to be $447 million in 2019 .
(b)
Amounts shown do not include amounts for the energy efficiency, demand reduction and combined heat and power programs.

The Utilities have an ongoing need to make substantial capital investments primarily to maintain the reliability of their electric, gas and steam delivery systems. Their estimated construction expenditures also reflect programs that will give customers greater control over their energy usage and bills, help integrate customers' new clean energy technologies into the Utilities’ electric delivery systems and accelerate the replacement of leak-prone gas distribution mains and service lines.

Estimated capital expenditures for Con Edison Transmission primarily reflect planned investments in the MVP gas transmission project. Estimated capital expenditures for the Clean Energy Businesses primarily reflect planned investments in renewable electric production projects. Actual capital expenditures for Con Edison Transmission and the Clean Energy Businesses could increase or decrease significantly from the amounts estimated depending on opportunities.






CON EDISON ANNUAL REPORT 2018
33



Contractual Obligations
The following table summarizes the Companies’ material obligations at December 31, 2018 to make payments pursuant to contracts. Long-term debt, capital lease obligations and other noncurrent liabilities are included on their balance sheets. Operating leases and electricity purchase agreements (for which undiscounted future annual payments are shown) are described in the notes to the financial statements.
  
Payments Due by Period
(Millions of Dollars)
Total
1 year
or less
Years
2 & 3

Years
4 & 5

After 5
years

Long-term debt (Statement of Capitalization)
 


 
 
CECONY
$14,290
$475
$990

$—

$12,825
O&R
762
62


700
Clean Energy Businesses
2,076
110
230
413
1,323
Parent
1,201
2
906
293

Interest on long-term debt (a)
15,418
791
1,494
1,385
11,748
Total long-term debt, including interest
33,747
1,440
3,620
2,091
26,596
Capital lease obligations (Note J)
 
 
 
 
 
CECONY
1
1



Total capital lease obligations
1
1



Operating leases (Notes J and Q)
 
 
 
 
 
CECONY
864
57
110
105
592
O&R
4
1
2
1