UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

☒   ANNUAL REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2021

 

☐  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission File Number: 000-54840

 

 

Golden Matrix Group, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

 

46-1814729

State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.) 

 

3651 Lindell Road, Suite D131, Las Vegas, NV 89103

(Address of principal offices)(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (702) 318-7548

 

Securities registered pursuant to section 12(b) of the Act:

None

 

Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, Par Value $0.00001 per share

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. ☐ Yes   ☒ No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act: ☐ Yes   ☒ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. ☒ Yes   ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). ☒ Yes   ☐ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). ☐ Yes   ☒ No

 

On July 31, 2020, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter, the aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was $34,877,966, based upon the closing price on that date of the Common Stock of the registrant on the OTC Pink Market of $3.48. For purposes of this response, the registrant has assumed that its directors, executive officers and beneficial owners of 5% or more of its Common Stock are deemed affiliates of the registrant.

 

As of April 30, 2021, the registrant had 23,289,273 shares of its Common Stock, $0.00001 par value, outstanding.

  

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

None.

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

3

 

 

 

 

PART I

4

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

4

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

26

 

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

54

 

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

54

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

54

 

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

54

 

 

 

 

 

PART II

55

 

 

 

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

55

 

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

57

 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

57

 

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

65

 

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

66

 

ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

67

 

ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

67

 

ITEM 9B.

OTHER INFORMATION

68

 

 

 

 

 

PART III

70

 

 

 

 

ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

70

 

ITEM 11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

78

 

ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

83

 

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

85

 

ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

91

 

ITEM 15.

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

92

 

ITEM 16.

FORM 10–K SUMMARY.

94

 

SIGNATURES

95

 

 

 
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Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Report”) contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, Section 21E of the Securities Act of 1934, as amended, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, that involve substantial risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts, but rather are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about our industry, our beliefs and our assumptions. Words such as “anticipate,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks” and “estimates” and variations of these words and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance or results. Forward-looking statements are based on information available at the time the statements are made and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from the information expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements in this Report. These factors include those set forth below under “Summary Risk Factors” and those disclosed under “Item 1A. Risk Factors”, below.

 

You should read the matters described in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and the other cautionary statements made in this Report, and incorporated by reference herein, as being applicable to all related forward-looking statements wherever they appear in this Report. We cannot assure you that the forward-looking statements in this Report will prove to be accurate and therefore prospective investors are encouraged not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Other than as required by law, we undertake no obligation to update or revise these forward-looking statements, even though our situation may change in the future.

 

Summary Risk Factors

 

Our business is subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including those in the section entitled “Item 1A. Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Report. These risks include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

 

 

 

our need for significant additional financing to grow and expand our operations, the availability and terms of such financing, and potential dilution which may be caused by such financing, if obtained through the sale of equity or convertible securities;

 

the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Company;

 

the ability of the Company to manage growth;

 

our limited operating history;

 

disruptions caused by acquisitions;

 

the Company’s reliance on its management;

 

the fact that the Company’s Chief Executive Officer has voting control over the Company;

 

related party relationships and the significant portion of the Company’s revenues generated thereby, as well as conflicts of interest related thereto;

 

the potential effect of economic downturns and market conditions on the Company’s operations and prospects;

 

the Company’s ability to protect proprietary information;

 

the ability of the Company to compete in its market;

 

the Company’s lack of effective internal controls;

 

dilution caused by efforts to obtain additional financing;

 

the effect of future regulation, the Company’s ability to comply with regulations and potential penalties in the event it fails to comply with such regulations;

 

the risks associated with gaming fraud, user cheating and cyber-attacks;

 

risks associated with systems failures and failures of technology and infrastructure on which the Company’s programs rely, as well as cybersecurity and hacking risks;

 

foreign exchange and currency risks;

 

the outcome of contingencies, including legal proceedings in the normal course of business;

 

the ability to compete against existing and new competitors;

 

the lack of a market for our securities and the volatility in the trading prices thereof caused thereby;

 

claims relating to alleged violations of intellectual property rights of others and our ability to maintain our intellection property rights;

 

the dependence on current management;

 

the ability to manage expenses associated with sales and marketing and necessary general and administrative and technology investments;

 

the ability to obtain a listing of our common stock on NASDAQ;

 

dilution caused by the sale of common stock;

 

general consumer sentiment and economic conditions that may affect levels of discretionary customer purchases of the Company’s products; and

 

Other risks disclosed below under “Item 1A. Risk Factors”.

 

 
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PART I

 

Item 1. Business

 

Introduction

 

This information included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplemental Data” of this Report.

 

Our logo and some of our trademarks and tradenames are used in this Report. This Report also includes trademarks, tradenames and service marks that are the property of others. Solely for convenience, trademarks, tradenames and service marks referred to in this Report may appear without the ®, ™ and SM symbols. References to our trademarks, tradenames and service marks are not intended to indicate in any way that we will not assert to the fullest extent under applicable law our rights or the rights of the applicable licensors if any, nor that respective owners to other intellectual property rights will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, their rights thereto. We do not intend the use or display of other companies’ trademarks and trade names to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other companies.

 

The market data and certain other statistical information used throughout this Report are based on independent industry publications, reports by market research firms or other independent sources that we believe to be reliable sources. Industry publications and third-party research, surveys and studies generally indicate that their information has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, although they do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. We are responsible for all of the disclosures contained in this Report, and we believe these industry publications and third-party research, surveys and studies are reliable. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding any third-party information presented in this Report, their estimates, in particular, as they relate to projections, involve numerous assumptions, are subject to risks and uncertainties, and are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under the section entitled “Item 1A. Risk Factors”. These and other factors could cause our future performance to differ materially from our assumptions and estimates. Some market and other data included herein, as well as the data of competitors as they relate to Golden Matrix Group, Inc., is also based on our good faith estimates.

 

On April 27, 2020, we filed a Certificate of Change Pursuant to NRS 78.209 with the Nevada Secretary of State pursuant to which we affected a reverse stock split of our authorized and issued and outstanding common stock in a ratio of 1-for-150. As a result of such filing, our authorized shares of common stock decreased from 6 billion to 40 million and our issued and outstanding shares of common stock decreased in a ratio of 1-for-150. All fractional shares of common stock remaining after the reverse split were rounded up to the nearest whole share. Pursuant to Section 78.207(1) of the Nevada Revised Statutes (“NRS”), shareholder approval was not required for this transaction. The Certificate of Change was effective with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) on June 26, 2020. The effects of the reverse stock split are retroactively reflected throughout this Report.

 

On May 12, 2020, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a change in the Company’s fiscal year from July 31 to January 31, effective immediately. As a result thereof, the Company has presented information in this Report, information where applicable, as of January 31, 2021, for the year ended January 31, 2021, for the six month transition period ended January 31, 2020, and for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018.

 

Unless the context requires otherwise, references to the “Company,” “we,” “us,” “our,” and “Golden Matrix” in this Report refer specifically to Golden Matrix Group, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiary.

 

 
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In addition, unless the context otherwise requires and for the purposes of this report only:

 

 

Exchange Act” refers to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended;

 

 

 

 

SEC” or the “Commission” refers to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission; and

 

 

 

 

Securities Act” refers to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

All dollar amounts in this Report are in U.S. dollars unless otherwise stated.

 

Where You Can Find Other Information

 

We file annual, quarterly, and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC like us at https://www.sec.gov. Copies of documents filed by us with the SEC are also available from us without charge, upon oral or written request to our Secretary, who can be contacted at the address and telephone number set forth on the cover page of this report. Our website address is https://goldenmatrix.com. The information on, or that may be accessed through, our website is not incorporated by reference into this Report and should not be considered a part of this Report.

 

Organizational History

 

The Company was incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 4, 2008, under the name Ibex Resources Corp. The Company’s business at the time was mining and exploration of mineral properties. In October 2009, the Company changed its name to Source Gold Corp, remaining in the business of acquiring exploration and development stage mineral properties. In April 2016, the Company changed its name to Golden Matrix Group, Inc., changing the direction of the Company’s business to focus on software technology.

 

On February 18, 2016, Edward Aruda, the then Chief Executive Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director of the Company, tendered his resignation from the Company as CEO, Secretary and Treasurer, remaining as a Director of the Company. On February 18, 2016, the Board of Directors appointed Mr. Anthony Brian Goodman as Chief Executive Officer, President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Chairman of the Board of Directors, and appointed Ms. Weiting ‘Cathy’ Feng as Chief Financial Officer and Director of the Company.

 

 
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On February 22, 2016, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Luxor Capital, LLC (“Luxor”), a Nevada limited liability corporation, which is wholly-owned by the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Anthony Brian Goodman. The Company purchased certain intellectual property relating to gaming (“Gaming IP”), along with the “know how” of that Gaming IP from Luxor. In consideration for the purchase, the Company agreed to issue 74 shares of the Company’s Common Stock and a Convertible Promissory Note in the amount of $2,374,712. On February 26, 2016, 60 shares were issued to Luxor.

 

On April 1, 2016, the Company entered into a Back Office/Service Provider Agreement with Articulate Pty Ltd (“Articulate”), which is wholly-owned by Anthony Brian Goodman, CEO and Chairman of the Company and his wife Marla Goodman, for consulting services. Pursuant to the agreement, Articulate would receive $4,500 per month for services rendered and reimbursement of office expenses from the Company for the first three months of the agreement and $9,000 per month thereafter, together with $1,500 per month toward rent and reimbursement of expenses. The agreement also provides the right for Articulate to convert any of the amount due into a convertible promissory note, which is convertible into the Company’s common stock at the seven-day average closing price prior to conversion. The agreement continues indefinitely until terminated by either party with 12 months prior notice. On January 1, 2018, the Company and Articulate entered into an addendum to the agreement to terminate the Company’s obligation to pay $9,000 per month to Articulate. On December 1, 2018, the Company and Articulate amended the agreement to require the Company to pay $3,500 per month in rental contribution to Articulate, as well as certain other expenses totaling $2,000. On August 1, 2019, the parties further amended the agreement to increase the amount of rental contribution to $4,000 and provide for certain other expenses to be payable to Articulate totaling $7,000. On November 1, 2019, the parties entered into a further addendum to the agreement, to provide for the agreement to remain in place for continuous 30-day periods, unless either party terminates the agreement with 30 days’ notice.

 

On April 8, 2016, Mr. Aruda resigned from his position on the Board of Directors with the Company. Mr. Aruda’s resignation was not due to any disagreement on any matter relating to the operations, policies, or practices of the Company.

 

On May 25, 2016, the Company entered into a Cancellation and Release Agreement with certain holders of promissory notes issued pursuant to agreements made with previous management, in the amount totaling $2,693,697, and in exchange for the return of mining claims held by the Company.

 

On June 1, 2016, the Company entered into a distribution usage rights agreement with Globaltech Software Services LLC. (“Globaltech”), whereby the Company agreed to provide certain proprietary technology in the form of a Credit Management system, Gaming system, and other Marketing and Gaming Technology. This agreement allowed the Company to bring operating revenue to the Company, and solidify the Company’s expertise in the gaming market. The distribution usage rights agreement was cancelled effective as of December 1, 2018.

 

On September 22, 2016, the Company entered into a Cancellation and Release Agreement with certain holders of promissory notes issued pursuant to agreements made with previous management, in the amount totaling $709,336, and in exchange for the return of mining claims held by the Company. The Company no longer has any mining assets. All mining claims and assets were disposed of, and/or transferred in exchange of the cancellation of convertible notes held by various note holders.

 

On February 28, 2018, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Luxor. Pursuant to the Asset Purchase Agreement, the Company purchased certain intellectual property and know-how relating to a proprietary gaming solution from Luxor (the “GM2 Asset”), in exchange, the Company issued 4,166,667 shares of common stock, and an Earn Out Payment calculated at 50% of the revenues generated by the GM2 Asset during the 12-month period from March 1, 2018 to February 28, 2019. A convertible note was required to be issued to Luxor before April 30, 2019, was to bear interest at the rate of 4% per annum, and be convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at a conversion price equal to the average of the seven trading days closing prices on the date prior to conversion. The GM2 Asset included all source code and documentation.

 

 
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On March 1, 2018, the Company entered into a License Agreement (the “License Agreement”) with Articulate. Pursuant to the License Agreement, Articulate received a license from the Company to use the GM2 Asset technology in East Asia to support gaming activity on mobile and desktop devices. Articulate agreed to pay the Company a usage fee calculated as a certain percentage of the monthly content and software usage within the GM2 Asset system (adjusted for U.S. dollars) in consideration for the use of the GM2 Asset technology. Specifically, the Company is due 0.25% of the monthly fees generated by the GM2 Asset in the event such fees are less than $100,000,000; 0.2% of the monthly fees generated by the GM2 Asset in the event such fees are over $100,000,000 and less than $200,500,000 and 0.15% of the monthly fees generated by the GM2 Asset in the event such fees are over $200,500,001.

 

Any amount of fees not paid when due accrue interest at the lesser of 3% per annum above LIBOR or the highest rate permitted by law. The License Agreement had an initial term of 12 months and automatically renews thereafter for additional 12-month terms, provided that the License Agreement may be terminated at any time with 30 days prior notice. The License Agreement has continued to automatically renew on a 12-month basis, with the most recent renewal being for the 12 months ended March 1, 2022.

 

On April 1, 2019, the Company issued Luxor a promissory note, which final note terms provide for a principal balance of $1,031,567, with interest accruing on the unpaid balance at a rate of 6% per annum. Installments of 20% of the total value of principal and interest were due on signing the note, 40% of the total value was due on October 1, 2019, and 40% of the total value including any accrued interest was due on April 1, 2020.

 

As of January 31, 2020, the balance of the principal of the Promissory Note was $170,254; interest accrued was $39,013, and a late fee payable of $4,000 was due. The total amount due was $213,267, which is convertible into the Company’s common stock as discussed above. As of January 31, 2021, the full amount of the note had been repaid.

 

On July 1, 2018, the Company entered into a License Agreement with Red Label Technology Pte. Ltd. (“Red Label”), pursuant to which the Company agreed to provide interactive gaming technology, online marketing systems and customer relation management systems to Red Label. Red Label received a license from the Company to use a unique system in incorporating gaming content, gaming management and marketing solutions to support the Company’s business-to-business operations.

 

On December 1, 2018, the Company entered into a Cancellation of Distribution Usage Rights Agreement with Globaltech. The parties have agreed to suspend minimum monthly charges from December 1, 2018 and work together to enter into a Co-operation agreement in the coming months.

 

Effective on April 22, 2021, the Board of Directors appointed Mr. Omar Jimenez as the Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer of the Company effective as of the same date. The Board of Directors also appointed Mr. Jimenez as the Principal Accounting/Financial Officer of the Company, effective following the filing of this Report (the “Annual Report Filing Date”).

 

In connection with such appointment, Mr. Anthony Brian Goodman, the President Chief Executive Officer and member of the Board of Directors of the Company, will cease serving as the Principal Accounting/Financial Officer of the Company on the Annual Report Filing Date, provided that Mr. Goodman continues to serve as the Chief Executive Officer, President and Principal Executive Officer of the Company. Additionally, in connection with such appointment, Weiting ‘Cathy’ Feng, who served as Chief Financial Officer and director of the Company prior to Mr. Jimenez’s appointment, ceased serving as Chief Financial Officer, and will serve as Chief Operating Officer and director of the Company moving forward.

 

 
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Prior Mining Claims

 

The Company previously held mining assets, which it no longer owns. All mining claims and assets were disposed of and/or transferred in exchange of the cancellation of convertible notes held by various note holders.

 

Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus, which causes the infectious disease known as COVID-19, was reported in Wuhan, China. The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” on January 30, 2020 and a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. In March and April, many U.S. states and foreign jurisdictions began issuing ‘stay-at-home’ orders. Subsequently, and continuing through the date of this Report, the COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacted global commercial activity, disrupted supply chains and contributed to significant volatility in financial markets. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic adversely impacted many different industries. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic could have a continued material adverse impact on economic and market conditions and trigger a period of global economic slowdown.

 

A significant or prolonged decrease in consumer spending on entertainment or leisure activities would likely have an adverse effect on demand for our product offerings, reducing cash flows and revenues, and thereby materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, a recurrence of COVID-19 cases or an emergence of additional variants or strains could cause other widespread or more severe impacts depending on where infection rates are highest. We will continue to monitor developments relating to disruptions and uncertainties caused by COVID-19.

 

As shown in our results of operations herein, we have to date, not experienced any significant material negative impact to our operations, revenues or gross profit due to COVID-19. However, moving forward, the range of possible impacts on the Company’s business from the coronavirus pandemic could include: (i) changing demand for the Company’s products and services; (ii) rising bottlenecks in the Company’s supply chain; and (iii) increasing contraction in the capital markets. At this time, the Company believes that it is premature to determine the potential impact on the Company’s business prospects from these or any other factors that may be related to the coronavirus pandemic; however, it is possible that COVID-19 and the worldwide response thereto, may have a material negative effect on our operations, cash flows and results of operations.

 

Currently we believe that we have sufficient cash on hand, and availability to raise additional funding, or borrow additional funding, as needed, to support our operations for the foreseeable future; however, we will continue to evaluate our business operations based on new information as it becomes available and will make changes that we consider necessary in light of any new developments regarding the pandemic.

 

The future impact of COVID-19 on our business and operations is currently unknown. The pandemic is developing rapidly and the full extent to which COVID-19 will ultimately impact us depends on future developments, including the duration and spread of the virus, as well as potential seasonality of new outbreaks.

 

Who We Are and What We Do

 

We are an established provider of enterprise Software-as-a-Service (“SaaS”) solutions for online casino operators and online sports betting operators, commonly referred to as iGaming operators.

 

We develop and own online gaming intellectual property (IP) and build configurable and scalable, turn-key and white-label gaming platforms for our international customers, located primarily in the Asia Pacific region.

 

 
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As of January 31, 2021, our systems had over 3.5 million registered players and a total of more than 400 unique casino and live game operations within all of our platforms including our GM-X, Turnkey Solution, and White Label Solutions.

 

The GM-X System provides access to over 4,000 unique, state of the art, online games, delivered by some of the world’s leading gaming providers.

 

Players play approximately 14 million games a day and wager approximately $14.5 million a day via the GM-X System platform.

 

The GM-X System turn-key solution (including modular, configurable and scalable gaming platforms), is a complete software package for starting an online gaming business, incorporating all the tools and gaming content necessary to run an online Casino and/or Sportsbook and offers a full suite of tools and features for successfully operating and maintaining an online gaming website; from player registration to user management and content management.

 

The GM-X System has been deployed primarily in the Asia Pacific and we are currently focused on expanding our deployment into Europe, U.S., South America, and Africa. The online gambling industry, in the U.S., is essentially regulated at the state level. The Company is currently in discussions with multiple specialist gaming attorneys in the U.S. and currently plans to engage one of these gaming specialists to represent the Company in its applications for a gaming license in the U.S.

 

The GM-X System provides a platform that facilitates our gaming customers’ operating online casinos, sportsbooks, lottery, and live games, as well as providing customers with seamless access to large portfolios of licensed gaming content, provided by established, licensed and accredited gaming content providers. We have distribution agreements with third party content providers to resell their game content. The game content includes games such as slots, table games (e.g., roulette, blackjack, and poker), sportsbooks and “live games.” A “live game” is when a live casino game is shown via a live streaming video link in real time from a casino table where live dealers deal cards from a licensed studio and allow players to place an online bet on the outcome of the card game. We have been granted distribution rights for the gaming content that we provide to our customers.

 

Our GM-X System provides the core platform for our online casino and sportsbook operators. The system contains the back-office tools necessary for the customer to run a successful online iGaming operation. These tools include player account registration and creation, sophisticated payment services and gateways, geolocation, marketing, loyalty management, real-time analytics, and comprehensive reporting. The Company’s platform can be accessed through both desktop and mobile applications.

 

The Company has developed its own proprietary Peer-to-Peer E-sports gaming product which is expected to launch in the coming months. This product will be marketed as the Player2P Platform (“Player2P”). The Player2P brand will be focused solely on esports gambling and 18+ gaming (i.e., gaming by those over 18 years of age). Player2P is expected to not only offer users traditional casino style games but allow players to compete against each other whilst playing E-sport console games.

 

In addition to launching the Player2P product into our existing distribution network, we will aim to launch this business-to-consumer (B2C) platform into selected States in the U.S., subject to regulatory approvals.

 

The Company plans to launch Player2P games as an E-sport skill game wherein competitive contestants compete against live opponents in video games, either online or in-person with real money at stake, subject to compliance with applicable law, and approval from applicable authorities.

 

Our GM-X System is designed to enable our customers to rapidly launch and scale their iGaming and online sportsbook operations. The GM-X System supports both social and real money online casino gaming (“iGaming”). The back-office of the GM-X System contains comprehensive player management capabilities, in which customer and player activity data is stored and processed in real-time. The back office offers analytic and reporting tools to help our customers create loyalty and attempt to generate the highest value from players. The GM-X System also provides customers access to extensive and comprehensive data to assist them with optimizing player value and loyalty.

 

 
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Our customers are primarily licensed online gaming operators. The Company also provides services and resells third party gaming content to licensed online gaming distributors. The majority of the Company’s customers hold gaming licenses in Asia, South America, and Europe. The Company provides business-to-business services and products and does not deal directly with players.

 

According to a study by Grand View Research, the online gaming industry is expected to witness substantial growth over the next five years, and in addition to the growth opportunity we see within our existing core markets, a large and growing universe of additional potential new customers for the GM-X System. Our focus will be on developing markets such as Latin America, Africa, and selected U.S. States that are currently implementing regulated frameworks for allowing real money betting. As a result, we believe we have a significant opportunity to expand our tried and tested systems into a much broader global market because our proprietary gaming technologies are flexible and scalable and have been built and tested over many years.

 

Our core markets are currently the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region and while we have a solid customer base; we are continuing to engage new gaming operators on a regular basis and we anticipate that our current operators will continue to grow. A September 2020 report by Statista reports that the gaming industry (including all games, not just online gambling) in the APAC region will be worth more than $174 billion by 2021, after seeing APAC games revenue amounting to $72.2 billion in 2019, which was more than double the revenue of the North American gaming market. Our vision is to become the platform of choice for casinos and sportsbook operators seeking to transition from a land-based casino and sportsbook environment onto an online environment.

 

Our Platform and Services

 

The GM-X System provides a unified, flexible, and highly scalable platform that can be rapidly deployed for social iGaming, real money iGaming, and online sports betting. In addition to our platform, we offer a seamless integration of the world’s leading casino games, sportsbook systems, and live games.

 

The Company has distribution rights for the distribution of third-party casino games, live games and sportsbook systems.

 

The Company generates revenue from these services based on fees charged pursuant to applicable contracts, which revenue is recognized over the time during which the services are provided. Typically, we are paid a portion of the revenue generated from our licensed content and pay the owners of such licensed games a portion of the revenue we receive.

 

The Company provides its systems as an enterprise SaaS solution, as well as providing third party games. Revenue streams are generated by the use of the GM-X System by our customers and also the use of the gaming content by our customers. Customers are primarily online casino operators and online sports betting operators, commonly referred to as iGaming operators as well as gaming content distributors.

 

Our GM-X System incorporates multiple modules, including, gaming content, sportsbook, player registration, payment gateways, back-office reports, accounting, management and customer loyalty and marketing tools.

 

Our real money iGaming applications comply with the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 and with the federal Wire Act of 1961. Payment gateways integrate with a wide range of third-party payment processors.

 

We may in the future need to initiate infringement claims or litigation. Litigation, whether we are a plaintiff or a defendant, can be expensive, time-consuming and may divert the efforts of our technical staff and managerial personnel, which could harm our business, whether or not such litigation results in a determination favorable to us. In addition, litigation is inherently uncertain, and thus we may not be able to stop our competitors from infringing upon our intellectual property rights, even if we are successful in any litigation.

 

 
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Despite our efforts to protect our technology and proprietary rights through licenses and contractual protections, unauthorized parties may still copy or otherwise obtain and use our software and technology. In addition, we intend to continue to expand our international operations, and effective intellectual property, copyright and trade secret protection may not be available or may be limited in foreign countries. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights could harm our business or our ability to compete. Further, other companies in the real money and social casino gaming industries may own large numbers of patents, copyrights and trademarks and may threaten litigation, or file suit against us based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. We may face allegations in the future that we have infringed on the intellectual property rights of third parties, including our competitors and non-practicing entities.

 

We also face the risk that third parties will claim that we infringe on their intellectual property rights, which could result in costly license fees or expensive litigation.

 

The iGaming and sports betting industries are subject to rapid technological change and we are developing technology and intellectual property that we believe is unique and provides us with a commercial advantage. While we respect third parties’ intellectual property rights avoid the inadvertent use of third party intellectual property, we may face claims in the future that the products or solutions that we develop, or those provided to us by third parties or used by our customers, infringe on third parties’ intellectual property rights.

 

GM-X System

 

Our GM-X System platform offers:

 

White Label flexible front-end development

 

Customized and localized design of the casino operator’s mobile application and website, with a branded experience that is consistent with the casino operator’s brand and market positioning and streamlines player registration and account funding.

 

We host our customers’ iGaming operations on a combination of proprietary and cloud servers including the Amazon Elastic Compute (EC2) Server. The Amazon EC2 Cloud is part of Amazon.com’s cloud-computing platform which is a highly scalable agile service enabling the Company’s ability to build, deploy and manage websites, apps or processes.

 

World’s leading gaming content

 

The GM-X System platform features a proprietary gaming engine that seamlessly integrates a large portfolio of gaming content that serves third party gaming content via a technical ‘middle layer’ that permits third party games to be published to the customers end user players through a single integration. The Company also offers operators quick access to our entire gaming portfolio via a single direct integration.

 

Online Sportsbook

 

We provide a seamless integration to one of the world’s leading Sportsbook Systems, through a license and services agreement.

 

 
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Loyalty Tools

 

 

Retention and Acquisition

 

The GM-X System provides comprehensive marketing and loyalty tools including Free Spins, Cash Bonuses, Leader Boards, Cash Back offers, Tournaments allowing casino operators to put their offers, games and unique brand experience in their players’ hands extending player sessions, increasing reactivation of players, boosting retention, and designing attractive bonus campaigns. Free Spins are a promotional acquisition and retention tool wherein the casino offers players a chance to play new and exciting slots without risking their own cash. The players can win real money and try out the latest online slot machines for free. Bonuses are free cash granted to players in response to a player’s wagering or activity within the casino. We have found that both are powerful loyalty tools.

 

 

Data Analytics

 

The GM-X System offers in-depth real time, structured, transactional and gameplay data providing an overview of the gaming platform’s performance, player activity, and real time visibility, allowing customers to make better decisions and to drill down into the data and see gaming activity at game play or transaction level.

 

Advanced reporting tools provide operators’ full visibility and control of the entire player lifecycle from one centralized point for all operational needs. A single account overview gives operators the capabilities and flexibility to tailor data-driven communication to player segments or even individual players, increasing the relevance of marketing activity to streamline costs and resources.

 

Support – 24/7 Gaming Support

 

In the future we plan to provide a range of term-based operational services to support our customers’ online gaming operations. Our tailored managed services are expected to include player customer support across email, phone and live chat, marketing agency services and network management with a 24/7 uptime guarantee. We also plan to provide custom game theme development services in select engagements where customers seek to differentiate themselves with gaming content unique to a customer’s branded experience.

  

Currencies

 

All major currencies are supported by the GM-X System.

 

Languages

 

Multiple out-of-the-box language options are available on the GM-X System.

 

Our Business Model

 

We provide platform and software services to our customers as well as third party gaming content which are all central to customer’s real money and social iGaming operations. We also plan to provide associated services including software development and technical and customer support in the future.

 

Our customers are primarily online casino operators and online sports betting operators, commonly referred to as iGaming operators, as well as the third-party gaming content distributors which are essentially resellers of our gaming content and our systems. Our customers are located in the Asia Pacific region, as well as in Europe.

 

 
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We currently earn revenue through two different revenue streams:

  

 

(1)

Online iGaming platform and software services; and

 

(2)

Resale of online gaming content from third party gaming content providers.

 

In respect of our iGaming platform and third-party content, our revenue is calculated on a share of the revenues generated by our customers’ use of our platform and gaming content in their offering of real money iGaming and social iGaming to their players.

  

In the future, we plan to add two additional revenue streams:

  

 

(1)

Software Development Services; and

 

(2)

Customer Support and Technical Support services.

 

Set out below is additional details regarding how we recognize/will recognize revenue for each of our revenue streams.

  

(1) Online iGaming Platform, Software Services and Third-Party Gaming Content

  

We generate revenue through service agreements with customers and distributors, when our customers use our platform, software and third-party gaming content in operating their real money and social iGaming offerings.

 

In real money iGaming, conducted via websites, apps, and social networking, real money is wagered for monetary prizes. In social iGaming (social casino) gambling games, no money is paid out for wagers (no “Cash Out” option) and thus no real-world financial benefit is gained from winning social casino games. In the social casino setting, a player can purchase chips with which to gamble on more games, but these chips have no real-world value and cannot be redeemed for cash.

 

Distributors are customers that act as sales agents and distribute our systems and third-party gaming content to casino and sports book operators. Distributors traditionally make a small margin on the resale of our systems and the third-party gaming content.

 

We enter into revenue share agreements with our customers wherein we receive a percentage of the operator’s net gaming revenue generated on our platform, or alternatively a usage fee based on a percentage of wagering that takes place on the system. This percentage varies based on a range of factors, including the source of the operator revenue (iGaming versus online sports betting) and the brand or source of the gaming content served to players on our platform (internally developed systems versus gaming content licensed from third party gaming developers).

 

The Company pays third party gaming developers a percentage of the operator’s net gaming revenue generated on our platform, the Company effectively receives a margin of gaming revenue, by charging the operator a higher percentage than it pays to the third-party supplier.

 

iGaming is players wagering on the outcome of a game online, and these activities include poker, slots, table games (poker, blackjack, etc.), live games and lottery games. Sports betting is a form of gambling that entails a player placing a wager, also known as a bet, on the outcome of a sporting event.

 

(2) Resale of online gaming content from third party gaming content providers

 

The Company has license agreements with distributors. These distributors are customers that act as sales agents and distribute our systems and third-party gaming content to casino and sports book operators. Distributors traditionally make a small margin on the resale of our systems and the third-party gaming content.

 

(3) Platform Software Development Services (planned)

  

In the future, we plan to generate revenue from platform software development services based on fees earned from the provision of platform development and related services. Revenue from platform and other development services will be recognized over time as we transfer control of the good or service and, accordingly, satisfy our performance obligation.

  

 
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(4) Support Services (planned)

  

The Company also plans to generate revenue in the future by providing 24-7 technical and customer support services. We anticipate designing our business model to align our incentives with those of our operator partners. During the implementation phase of a new deployment, we bill our customers for professional services provided. Upon the successful deployment of the GM-X System, we anticipate providing ongoing managed services pursuant to term-based agreements. Unlike traditional on-premise enterprise software deployments, which feature licenses and maintenance contracts, we retain exclusive access to our source code and provide software updates on a continuing basis.

  

Intellectual Property

 

Our intellectual property includes the source code for our GM-X System and other iGaming IP, the content of our websites, our registered domain names, our registered and unregistered trademarks, and certain trade secrets. We believe that our intellectual property is an essential asset of our business and that our registered domain names and our technology infrastructure will give us a competitive advantage in the marketplace. We rely on a combination of trademark, copyright and trade secret laws in the United States and foreign jurisdictions, as well as contractual provisions, to protect our proprietary technology and our brands. We also rely on copyright laws to protect the appearance and design of our sites and applications, although to date we have not registered for copyright protection on any particular content. We have registered numerous Internet domain names related to our business in order to protect our proprietary interests. The efforts we have taken to protect our intellectual property may not be sufficient or effective, and, despite these precautions, it may be possible for other parties to copy or otherwise obtain and use the content of our websites or our brand names without authorization.

 

Our primary web property is:

 

 

www.goldenmatrix.com

 

Currently the Company via its wholly-owned subsidiary Global Technology Group Pty Ltd, has an Alderney Gambling Control Commission license. The government of Alderney offers software service providers in the gambling industry with a gambling license that allows gambling operators to conduct business related to casino, lotto, and other gaming related activities. Alderney has long been recognized as one of the preferred locations for online Gambling operators. Alderney is regarded in the community as one of the strictest licensing jurisdictions with policies aimed at improving transparency and cultivating a good gaming environment.

 

The Company is required to have a recognized business-to-business (B2B) gambling license in order to acquire certain gaming content. Currently the Company is not required to have a gaming license for the resale of its GM-X System or third-party content to operators in the jurisdictions in which it currently conducts business, however as the Company expands its global distribution licensing regulatory requirements will be required.

 

Our Growth Strategy

 

Our objective in managing capital is to ensure that we have sufficient liquidity to manage our business and growth objectives while maximizing return to shareholders. Liquidity is necessary to meet our existing general capital needs, fund our growth and expansion plans, and undertake certain capital market activities. We have historically met our liquidity needs through cash flow generated from operations and the sale of equity securities in private transactions. Our current objective is to meet all of our current liquidity and existing general capital requirements from the cash flow generated from ongoing operations and funds raised through the sale of equity. We may raise funding in the future to conduct potential acquisitions through the issuance of debt and/or the sale of capital stock. The COVID-19 pandemic has had no material impact on our business to date and we expect our business to be generally resilient to the pandemic. We have been able to maintain operations with employees and consultants working remotely to sustain our sales and the support of our online products. Notwithstanding the above, we have experienced minor productivity issues in connection with the movement of certain resources as a result of the pandemic.

 

 
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Key elements of our growth strategy include:

 

 

Supporting our existing customers as they scale up their respective iGaming and online sportsbook operations. As our customers’ businesses grow, we intend to deploy additional resources to develop the GM-X System’s platform functionality, expand our gaming content portfolios by integrating additional third-party content providers, and seek to obtain additional regulatory approvals to operate in other global markets.

 

 

 

 

Expanding our global reach by securing new casino and sportsbook operator customers in existing and newly regulated markets.

 

 

 

 

Investing in sales and marketing initiatives to aggressively pursue new deployment opportunities in developing markets such as Africa and Latin America, and also exploring opportunities in the U.S. market.

 

 

 

 

Developing and deploying our own proprietary gaming content in both casino iGaming as well as E-sport categories. It is currently anticipated that our E-sport portfolio will launch in the second quarter of 2021.

 

 

 

 

Pursuing acquisitions of synergistic companies and assets with the goal of expanding our competitive position in the markets in which we operate. We are also exploring the opportunity to selectively acquire independent slot development studios in order to launch our own proprietary games on our platform, funding permitting.

 

The Company does not intend to make significant investments (except for potential acquisitions, none of which are currently planned or pending) to support our business growth strategy. We believe that our business model is highly scalable and existing resources will be utilized to develop new offerings and features and enhance our existing platform, and improve our operating infrastructure.

 

The Company may face significant costs with respect to legal fees incurred in the applications for licenses and continued regulatory requirements and legal representation.

 

In order to acquire complementary businesses and technologies, we may need to engage in equity or debt financings to secure additional funds. Our ability to obtain additional capital, if and when required, will depend on our business plans, investor demand, our operating performance, capital markets conditions and other factors. If we raise additional funds by issuing equity, equity-linked or debt securities, those securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to the rights of our then issued and outstanding equity or debt, and our existing shareholders may experience dilution. If we are unable to obtain additional capital when required, or on satisfactory terms, our ability to continue to support our business growth or to respond to business opportunities, challenges or unforeseen circumstances could be adversely affected, and our business may be harmed.

 

We may acquire other businesses, and our business may be detrimentally affected if we are unable to successfully integrate acquired businesses into our company or otherwise manage the growth associated with multiple acquisitions.

 

As part of our business strategy, we have made, and we intend to make acquisitions as opportunities arise to add new or complementary businesses, products, brands, or technologies. In some cases, the costs of such acquisitions may be substantial, including as a result of professional fees and due diligence efforts. There is no assurance that the time and resources expended on pursuing a particular acquisition will result in a completed transaction, or that any completed transaction will ultimately be successful. In addition, we may be unable to identify suitable acquisition or strategic investment opportunities, or may be unable to obtain any required financing or regulatory approvals, and therefore may be unable to complete such acquisitions or strategic investments on favorable terms. We may decide to pursue acquisitions with which our investors may not agree and we cannot assure investors that any acquisition or investment will be successful or otherwise provide a favorable return on investment. In addition, if we fail to successfully close transactions or integrate new teams, or integrate the products and technologies associated with these acquisitions into our company, our business could be seriously harmed. Acquisitions may expose us to operational challenges and risks, including:

 

 
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the ability to profitably manage acquired businesses or successfully integrate the acquired businesses’ operations, personnel, financial reporting, accounting and internal controls, technologies and products into our business;

 

 

 

 

increased indebtedness and the expense of integrating acquired businesses, including significant administrative, operational, economic, geographic in managing and integrating the expanded or combined operations;

 

 

 

 

entry into jurisdictions or acquisition of products or technologies with which we have limited or no prior experience, and the potential of increased competition with new or existing competitors as a result of such acquisitions;

 

 

 

 

the ability to fund our capital needs and any cash flow shortages that may occur if anticipated revenue is not realized or is delayed, whether by general economic or market conditions, or unforeseen internal difficulties; and

 

 

 

 

the ability to retain or hire qualified personnel required for expanded operations.

 

Our acquisition strategy may not succeed if we are unable to remain attractive to target companies or expeditiously close transactions.

 

Over the next five years, we plan to:

 

 

Support our existing customers as they continue to scale up their respective iGaming operations.

 

 

 

 

Deploy additional gaming content and allied products to not only generate additional revenues, but also provide value to our customers in terms of customer engagement, loyalty and retention.

 

 

 

 

Grow our internal resources to support evolving customer requirements.

 

 

 

 

Continue to invest in our proprietary GM-X System platform’s functionality by expanding our gaming content library and third-party gaming content integrations. The Company will utilize its success and growing recognition in the market to negotiate additional distribution agreements with leading gaming content providers.

 

 

 

 

Move expeditiously to obtain regulatory approvals to operate in new regulated global markets.

 

 

 

 

Seek to form new relationships and partnerships with leading gaming companies to ensure larger distribution channels, more global markets and a broader range of gaming content.

 

 

 

 

Continue to acquire new casino operator customers in existing and new regulated markets.

 

 

 

 

Continue to invest in sales and marketing initiatives to aggressively pursue new deployment opportunities.

 

 

 

 

Expand our gaming content development capabilities.

 

 

 

 

Invest in our gaming development capabilities in order to expand our portfolio of high-quality, in-house content, which we intend to strategically serve within our GM-X System, in order to improve our overall margins.

 

 

 

 

Seek to obtain a U.S. gaming license that will enable us to enter the U.S. market (where legal and applicable).

 

 

 

 

Pursue an acquisition strategy, whereby we intend to pursue a growth strategy aimed at strengthening our competitive position in the markets in which we compete through the acquisition of other businesses and assets that we believe will be accretive to our business.

 

 
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Employees and Employee Relations

 

As of the date of this Report, we have two employees (our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer) and sixteen consultants located in four countries. Additionally, Mr. Omar Jimenez, our recently appointed Chief Financial Officer and Chief Compliance Officer, serves as a part-time consultant to the Company. We currently conduct our business using the services of consultants and outside contractors. We do not intend to have any material change in the number of employees over the next 12 months. Where possible, we intend to conduct our business largely through consultants on a contract and fee for service basis.

 

We have consultants and staff located in multiple countries and a significant level of operations outside of the U.S., which subjects us, potentially to additional costs and risks that could adversely affect our operating results.

 

A significant portion of our operations are located outside of the U.S. We have software development, customer support and sales centers in the Philippines, Australia, and Taiwan, which account for most of our software development, support and sales personnel.

  

Our goal is to attract and retain highly qualified and motivated personnel. We also often employ independent contractors to support our efforts. None of our employees or contractors are subject to a collective bargaining agreement. We consider our employee relations to be good and we have never experienced a work stoppage.

 

We are committed to maintaining a working environment in which diversity and equality of opportunity are actively promoted and all unlawful discrimination is not tolerated. We are committed to ensuring employees are treated fairly and are not subjected to unfair or unlawful discrimination. We value diversity and to that end recognize the educational and business benefits of diversity amongst our employees, applicants, and other people with whom we have dealings.

 

The Company has an equity compensation plan in place to attract and retain valuable human resources.

 

Recruitment

 

The Company strives to attract the best talent in order to meet the current and future demands of our business. We regularly advertise at universities and via online job portals.

 

The Company has a compelling employee and consultant value proposition that leverages our vibrant culture and state of the art working environment to attract talent to our Company.

 

 
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Employee and Consultant Benefits

 

We offer comprehensive benefit programs to our employees and consultants including a stock option plan. We offer financial well-being, a balance in working and personal life, culture and community support and development. We recognize and support the development and continuing education of our employees and offer opportunities to participate external learning programs.

 

Health and Safety

 

The health and safety of our employees and consultants is a high priority. The Company ensures a safe working environment, safe equipment, policies, and procedures in order to ensure workers’ health and safety. Workers’ insurance is maintained to protect workers against workplace injury or illness.

 

The Company has a COVID-19 Safety Plan:

 

 

Adding work from home flexibility;

 

Encourage those who are sick to stay home;

 

Increasing cleaning protocols across all locations;

 

Initiating regular communication regarding impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including health and safety protocols and procedures;

 

Providing additional personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies;

 

Prohibiting international non-essential travel for all employees; and

 

Requiring masks to be worn in all locations where required by local law.

 

Diversity and Inclusion

 

The Company has a rich culture and history of inclusion and diversity and this has enabled it to create, develop and fully leverage the strengths of its workforce to meet and exceed customer expectations and meet its growth objectives.

 

Competition

 

We operate in a global and dynamic market and compete with a variety of organizations that offer services similar to those that we offer. The online gaming industry is highly competitive. A number of companies offer products that are similar to our products and target the same markets as we do. Certain of our current and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater financial, technical and marketing resources, and a larger installed customer base than we do. These competitors may be able to respond more quickly than we can to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements, develop superior products, and devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products than we can.

 

We face competition primarily from: (1) other gaming companies that provide competing services and products to customers, (2) online and retail casino operators that develop their own proprietary online gaming capabilities, and (3) other similar existing or developing technology providers that develop competing platforms.

 

Our primary competitors are overseas based online gaming technology companies. With few exceptions, a majority of these gaming companies are listed on the London Stock Exchange and they use their own software.

 

Examples of competing companies including; Relax Gaming, GAN, Softswiss, Bragg Gaming Group, Everymatrix, Softgamings and Gammastack.

 

As an independent online gaming technology provider, we believe that we retain the ability to utilize the most profitable platform available and are not restricted to a single platform. Additionally, by ensuring that we operate in compliance with U.S. laws, we believe that in the event of legalized gaming in the U.S., we would not be precluded from taking advantage of U.S.-based gaming.

 

 
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Industry and Market

 

According to an April 2020 report by Grand View Research, the global online gambling market size was valued at $53.7 billion in 2019 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.5% from 2020 to 2027, reaching $127.3 billion by 2027.

 

Our core markets are currently the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region and while we have a solid customer base; we are continuing to engage new gaming operators on a regular basis and we anticipate that our current operators will continue to grow. A September 2020 report by Statista reports that the gaming industry (including all games, not just online gambling) in the APAC region will be worth more than $174 billion by 2021, after seeing APAC games revenue amounting to $72.2 billion in 2019, which was more than double the revenue of the North American gaming market.

 

According to a November 2020 article from Espn.com (United States of sports betting: An updated map of where every state stands), there are currently 20 U.S. states that allow online sports betting (through approved and regulated betting portals), and according to bettingusa.com, there are five states (Delaware, Nevada, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia), where online casino games, online poker, or both are currently legal (again, through approved and regulated betting portals). As a result, the current U.S. market for the Company’s products and services is limited; however, the Company hopes that more U.S. states will pass laws in the upcoming months and years to legalize more forms of online gambling. Until such time as those laws are passed, if ever, the Company anticipates the majority of its revenues coming from Asia, South America, Europe, Africa, and Latin America.

 

Our vision is to become the platform of choice for casinos and sportsbook operators seeking to transition from a land-based casino and sportsbook environment onto an online environment.

 

Regulation

 

The offering of online gaming platforms and related software and solutions is subject to extensive regulation and approval by various national, federal, state, provincial, tribal and foreign agencies (collectively, “gaming authorities”). Gaming laws require us to obtain licenses or findings of suitability from gaming authorities for our platforms and products. The criteria used by gaming authorities to make determinations as to the qualification and suitability of an applicant varies among jurisdictions, but generally require the submission of detailed personal and financial information followed by a thorough and sometimes lengthy investigation. Gaming authorities have broad discretion in determining whether an applicant qualifies for licensing or should be found suitable. Notwithstanding the foregoing, some jurisdictions explicitly prohibit gaming in all or certain forms and we will not market our gaming platform or services in these jurisdictions.

 

Currently the Company via its wholly-owned subsidiary Global Technology Group Pty Ltd, has an Alderney Gambling Control Commission (“AGCC”) license. The government of Alderney offers software service providers in the gambling industry with a gambling license that allows gambling operators to conduct business related to casino, lotto, and other gaming related activities. Alderney has long been recognized as one of the preferred locations for online Gambling operators. Alderney is regarded in the community as one of the strictest licensing jurisdictions with policies aimed at improving transparency and cultivating a good gaming environment. 

 

The Alderney Gaming Control Commission offers two categories of eGambling licences: (1) A Category 1 Licence authorizes the organization and preparation of gambling operations, namely the registration and verification of players, the contractual relationship with them, and the management of player funds; and (2) A Category 2 Licence authorizes the effecting of the gambling transaction including operational management of a gambling platform located within an approved hosting center.

  

Global Technology Group Pty currently holds an AGCC Category 2 Associate Certificate.

 

 
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A Category 2 Associate is an entity to whom a Category 1 eGambling licensee transfers customers, or allows them to be transferred, for the purpose of that entity effecting gambling transactions with the customer or arranging for those customers to gamble with others.

 

An eGambling license from the AGCC can be used by a licensee to operate in any country where it is legal to do so. In some countries, including the UK for example, a licensee will also be required to obtain a local licence issued by that country if accessing that market.

 

Gambling sites licensed in Alderney under Category 1 are required to pay a £35,000 fee the first year in operation and a yearly fee thereafter based on the previous year’s “net gaming yield.” The annual fee ranges from £35,000 to £140,000 depending on how much money the gambling site is bringing in. Category 2 licensed companies are required to pay an introductory fee of £17,500 which applies for the first year and £35,000 per year thereafter.

 

In some instances, the Company may be required to have a recognized business-to-business (B2B) gambling license in order to acquire and distribute certain gaming content.

 

While the Company has a Category 2 Associate Certificate from the AGCC, it is not required to have a gaming license for its current services—the resale of its GM-X System or the sale of third-party content to operators in the jurisdictions in which it currently conducts business (and is not required to have a gaming license for its planned services including the provision of support services and software development), and therefore is not currently utilizing the AGCC license.

  

As the Company expands its global distribution, licensing and regulatory requirements may be required.

 

We sell and license our products to operators in the online gaming industry whose ability to operate in any jurisdiction may be impacted by changes in regulations. Even in jurisdictions where we have licenses, there can be no guarantee that a jurisdiction will not change its regulations in ways that impair our revenue or that would cause us to incur significant operating expenses in order to maintain compliance. Material changes, new laws or regulations, or material differences in interpretations by courts or governmental authorities could cause us to incur substantial additional compliance costs and adversely affect our operating results. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors,” for an additional discussion regarding such risks.

 

Given the dynamic and rapid evolution of the iGaming industry, it can be difficult to plan strategically, as it relates to product rollout in new or existing jurisdictions which may be delayed or denied, and it is possible that competitors will be more successful than the Company at adapting to change and pursuing business opportunities.

 

As the online iGaming industry advances, including with respect to regulation in new and existing jurisdictions, we may become subject to additional regulation and compliance-related costs, including licensing and taxes. Consequently, our online gaming offerings may not grow at the rates expected or be successful in the long term.

 

If our product offerings do not obtain support or maintain support, or if they fail to grow in a manner in which we anticipate, or if we are unable to offer our products and systems in particular jurisdictions that may be material to our business, then our results of operations and financial situation could be harmed.

 

The online gaming industry is heavily regulated and the Company’s failure to obtain or maintain required licenses or approvals, or otherwise comply with applicable regulation, could be disruptive to our business and could adversely affect our operations.

 

Our Company, officers, directors, major shareholders, key employees, and business partners are generally subject to the laws and regulations relating to iGaming in the jurisdictions in which we conduct business. These laws and regulations vary from one jurisdiction to another and future legislative and regulatory action or other governmental action, and may have a material impact on our operations and financial results. In particular, some jurisdictions have introduced regulations attempting to restrict or prohibit online gaming, while others have taken the position that online gaming should be licensed and regulated and have adopted or are in the process of considering legislation to enable that to happen.

 

 
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Regulatory regimes vary by jurisdiction. The Company currently is not required to hold a gambling license for the sale of its GM-X System or third-party software in the jurisdictions in which it currently conducts business, however most regulatory regimes include the following elements:

 

 

an ability to apply for one or more gaming licenses for one or more categories of products (for example, the UK);

 

 

 

 

a requirement for gaming license applicants to make detailed and extensive disclosures as to their beneficial ownership, their source of funds, the probity and integrity of certain persons associated with the applicant, the applicant’s management competence and structure and business plans, the applicant’s proposed geographical territories of operation and the applicant’s ability to operate a gaming business in a socially responsible manner in compliance with regulation;

 

 

 

 

ongoing disclosure and reporting obligations, on a periodic and unplanned basis in response to issues affecting the business;

 

 

 

 

the testing and certification of games, software and systems; and

 

 

 

 

social responsibility obligations.

 

Gaming licenses are subject to conditions, suspension or revocation by the issuing regulatory authority at any time.

 

We may be unable to obtain or maintain all necessary registrations, licenses, permits or approvals, and could incur fines or experience delays related to the licensing process, which could adversely affect our operations and financial viability.

 

The determination of suitability process may be expensive and time-consuming. Our delay or failure to obtain gaming licenses in any jurisdiction may prevent us from distributing our product offerings, increasing our customer base and/or generating revenues. A gaming regulatory body may refuse to issue or renew a gaming license if the Company, or one of our directors, officers, employees, major shareholders, or business partners:

 

A gaming regulatory body may refuse to issue or renew a gaming license or restrict or condition the same, based on the historic activities of the Company or our current or former directors, officers, employees, major shareholders or business partners, which could adversely affect our operations or financial condition.

 

Our product offerings may require approval in regulated jurisdictions in which they are offered; this process cannot be assured or guaranteed.

 

If we fail to obtain the necessary gaming license in a given jurisdiction, we would likely be prohibited from distributing and providing product offerings in that particular jurisdiction. Delays in regulatory approvals or failure to obtain such approvals may also serve as a barrier to entry to the market for our product offerings. If we are unable to overcome the barriers to entry, it will materially affect our results of operations and future prospects.

 

To the extent new online gaming jurisdictions are established or expanded, we cannot guarantee we will be successful in expanding our business or customer base in line with the growth of existing jurisdictions. If we are unable to effectively develop and operate directly or indirectly within these new markets or if our competitors are able to successfully penetrate geographic markets that we cannot access or where we face other restrictions, then our business, operating results and financial condition could be impaired. Our failure to obtain or maintain the necessary regulatory approvals in jurisdictions, whether individually or collectively, would have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

 
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U.S. Regulatory Environment

 

State Level

 

As described above, according to a November 2020 article from Espn.com (United States of sports betting: An updated map of where every state stands), there are currently 20 U.S. states that allow online sports betting (through approved and regulated betting portals), and according to bettingusa.com, there are five states (Delaware, Nevada, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia), where online casino games, online poker, or both are currently legal (again, through approved and regulated betting portals). As a result, the current U.S. market for the Company’s products and services is limited; however, the Company hopes that more U.S. states will pass laws in the upcoming months and years to legalize more forms of online gambling. Until such time as those laws are passed, if ever, the Company anticipates the majority of its revenues coming from Asia, South America, Europe, Africa, and Latin America.

 

Federal Level

 

On October 13, 2006, then President George W. Bush, signed into law “The Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 (“UIGEA”).” This act prohibits those involved in the business of betting or wagering from accepting any financial instrument, electronic or otherwise, for deposit that is intended to be utilized for unlawful Internet gambling. While the UIGEA does not define online gambling as being illegal, the UIGEA instructs the U.S. Treasury Department and Federal Reserve to impose obligations upon financial institutions and other payment processors to establish procedures designed to block online gaming-related financial transactions. It also expressly requires Internet bets and wagers to comply with the law of the jurisdiction where the wagers are initiated and received (i.e., within state borders). The law contains a safe harbor for wagers placed within a single state (disregarding intermediate routing of the transmission) where the method of placing the wager and receiving the wager is authorized by that state’s law, provided the underlying regulations establish appropriate age and location verification.

 

In addition to regulation at the state level, various federal laws apply to online gambling. Those include (1) the UIGEA, discussed above, (2) the Illegal Gambling Business Act and (3) the Travel Act. The Illegal Gambling Business Act (“IGBA”), makes it a crime to conduct, finance, manage, supervise, direct or own all or part of an “illegal gambling business” and the Travel Act makes it a crime to use the mail or any facility in interstate commerce with the intent to “distribute the proceeds of any unlawful activity,” or “otherwise promote, manage, establish, carry on, or facilitate the promotion, management, establishment, or carrying on, of any unlawful activity.” For there to be a violation of either the IGBA or the Travel Act there must be a violation of underlying state law.

 

In addition, the Wire Act of 1961 (the “Wire Act”) provides that anyone engaged in the business of betting or wagering that knowingly uses a wire communication facility for the transmission in interstate or foreign commerce of bets or wagers or information assisting in the placing of bets or wagers on any sporting event or contest, or for the transmission of a wire communication which entitles the recipient to receive money or credit as a result of bets or wagers, or for information assisting in the placing of bets or wagers, will be fined or imprisoned, or both. In September 2011, the U.S. Department of Justice released to the public a formal legal opinion on the scope of the Wire Act concluding, interstate transmissions of wire communications that do not relate to a ‘sporting event or contest’ fall outside the reach of the Wire Act.

 

Any or all of our planned future operations in the U.S. could be subject to, and/or may need to comply with the UIGEA, IGBA, Travel Act, Wire Act, and other state and federal statutes.

 

Recent Events

 

Sportsbook Software License and Services Agreement

 

On October 28, 2020, the Company entered into a Sportsbook Software License and Services Agreement (the “License Agreement”) with Amelco UK Limited, a company incorporated in the United Kingdom (“Amelco”), pursuant to which the Company acquired a license to use Amelco’s Sportsbook and Licensed Application for the purpose of sub-licensing (reselling) the Sportsbook and Licensed Application to the Company’s existing or potential resellers and/or operators. Under the terms of the License Agreement, Amelco granted us a limited, non-exclusive, non-transferable and non-assignable (except as provided for in the agreement) license to use the Sportsbook technology. The agreement contains various representations and warranties of the parties, confidentiality obligations, limitations on liability and limited warranties of Amelco.

 

 
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Pursuant to the License Agreement, Amelco will provide software and will also provide various services to the Company. The License Agreement requires the Company to pay Amelco an agreed upon percentage of the gross gaming revenues received by the Company from any sub-licensee of the technology. 

 

The term of the License Agreement is for an initial period of 2 years from the date the sportsbook becomes available to end-users. The date that the system was available to end-users was 12th April 2021. The term will be automatically renewable for additional 2-year periods after the date which the sportsbook becomes available to end-users, until, at least 120 days prior to the end of the then current term, the agreement is terminated by either party. The License Agreement may also be terminated upon a breach of the agreement (subject to a thirty-day right to cure by the breaching party after notice thereof is provided by the non-breaching party), or in the event a party enters into bankruptcy or similar proceedings. Additionally, Amelco may terminate the License Agreement if we fail to pay amounts due within 15 days of the due date thereof; a change of control of the Company occurs (unless Amelco approves of such in writing); in the event certain restrictions affecting Amelco or the Company occur under applicable law or regulatory enforcement; or upon the expiration of Amelco’s agreements with third parties relating to the software. Finally, Amelco can terminate the agreement with 90 days prior notice if the royalty payable to Amelco falls below budgeted projections in any three successive periods.

  

Distribution Agreement

 

On November 18, 2020, we entered into a Distribution Agreement, which included a License and Services Agreement (collectively, the “Distribution Agreement”) with Playtech Software Limited, a company incorporated in the United Kingdom (“Playtech”). The Agreement has an effective date of December 1, 2020 (“Commencement Date”).

 

Under the terms of the Distribution Agreement, Playtech has an exclusive license to Company products and all intellectual property rights covered under the agreement, such that Playtech shall be the sole and exclusive distributor of all Company products worldwide (the “Playtech Exclusivity”). Company products covered under the agreement include the GM-X System, the Company’s planned E-sports products, a marketing and loyalty system to be created for Playtech and a gaming system proprietary to the Company. The term of the Playtech Exclusivity begins on the Commencement Date, and continues for a period of 12 months after which the first product subject to exclusivity has been launched by a sub-licensee of Playtech (the “Initial Playtech Exclusivity Term”). Following the Initial Playtech Exclusivity Term, the Playtech Exclusivity automatically renews for additional 12 months periods, provided that if the total fees attributable to the products subject to exclusivity distributed by Playtech (in aggregate) at the end of the Initial Playtech Exclusivity Term or any extended term, is less than $300,000, then we have the right to revoke the Playtech Exclusivity for the subsequent 24 months’ period (during which time period Playtech retains the non-exclusive right to distribute such products), unless Playtech agrees to extend the exclusivity and pays the Company the difference between the actual fees attributable to the products and the $300,000 minimum fee within six months. The agreement contains customary representations, covenants and warranties, rights of audit and review, confidentiality obligations of the parties, indemnification obligations and data protection requirements.

 

For the distribution of planned E-sports products and a gaming system proprietary to the Company, fees payable by Playtech to the Company total (i) 6% of the license fees base (ii) 50% of the remaining license fees base which Playtech determines for the fees it charges directly from the applicable sub-licensees for the distribution of the product.

 

For the loyalty system, the license fee is waived from months 1 to 12 (including) commencing on the Commencement Date. From months 13 and onwards, the license fee is equivalent to 0.25% of the revenue actually collected by Playtech where such revenue is generated solely and exclusively from the games supported on the loyalty system distributed by Playtech, with a minimum payment of €10,000 per month but up to a maximum amount of €100,000 per month. Playtech has no obligation to distribute the loyalty system following the initial 12 months following the Commencement Date.

 

 
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Pursuant to the Distribution Agreement, we have a non-exclusive license to distribute the Playtech Games within such US states in which we hold applicable regulatory licenses. The Playtech Games include casino, poker, live-dealer and sports-betting games.

 

Fees payable by us to Playtech from the distribution of the Playtech Games total the sum of (i) 8% of the license fees base (ii) 50% of the remaining license fees base which Playtech determines for the fees charged directly from the applicable sub-licensees for the distribution of the applicable Playtech Games.

 

The term of the agreement is for an initial period of three years from the Commencement Date, renewable thereafter for successive three-year periods unless either party provides written notice of their intent not to renew at least 90 days prior to such renewal date, subject to certain rights to terminate such agreement during the term in the event of a breach of the agreement, and/or if certain other fundamental events occur (for example, bankruptcy of the parties).

 

Share Purchase Agreement

 

On December 22, 2020, we entered into a Share Purchase Agreement (the “Share Purchase Agreement”) with Anthony Brian Goodman, the sole director and owner of Global Technology Group Pty Ltd, a company incorporated in Australia (“GTG”) and our Chief Executive Officer and director.

 

GTG (a non-operational company formed under the laws of Australia) held a current Gaming License granted by the Alderney Gambling Control Commission (AGCC)(located in the Channel Islands). The license is one of the world’s most recognized gaming licenses and the acquisition of such license allows the Company to conduct gaming business in certain jurisdictions in Europe. Such acquisition is also anticipated to help the Company streamline the acquisition of additional licenses in other jurisdictions, of which there can be no assurance.

 

Under the terms of the Share Purchase Agreement, Mr. Goodman agreed to sell 100% of the shares in GTG to the Company for a total of 85,000 Pounds Sterling (€)(approximately $113,000) to help the Company conduct certain business-to-business (B2B) gaming transactions and expand its operation into Europe. The consideration is simply to recoup Mr. Goodman’s setup costs. As of January 31, 2021, the consideration has not been paid.

 

The Share Purchase Agreement also requires Mr. Goodman to lodge a change of control with the Alderney Gambling Control Commission and provide necessary know-how and hand over assistance that will enable the Company to fully utilize the Gaming License.

 

The acquisition of GTG closed on January 19, 2021.

 

Private Offering of Units 

 

On August 20, 2020, the Company sold, to eleven accredited investors, an aggregate of 527,029 units, with each unit consisting of one share of restricted common stock and one warrant to purchase one share of common stock, at a price of $3.40 per unit, raising cash of $1,791,863. The units were sold pursuant to the Company’s entry into subscription agreements with each investor. The subscription agreements provide the investors customary piggyback registration rights (for both the shares and the shares of common stock underlying the warrants) which remain in place for the lesser of one year following the closing of the offering and the date that the applicable investor is eligible to sell the applicable securities under Rule 144 of the Securities Act, as amended. Such piggyback registration rights agreements also provided that the Company is not required to register securities in a registration statement relating solely to an offering by the Company of securities for its own account if the managing underwriter or placement agent have advised the Company in writing that the inclusion of such securities would have a material adverse effect upon the ability of the Company to sell securities for its own account.

  

 
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The warrants had an exercise price of $4.10 per share (and no cashless exercise rights), and were exercisable until the earlier of (a) August 20, 2022, and (b) the 30th day after the Company provided the holder of the warrants notice that the closing sales price of the Company’s common stock has closed at or above $6.80 per share for a period of ten consecutive trading days.

 

From November 23, 2020, to December 7, 2020 (ten consecutive trading days), the closing sales price of the Company’s common stock closed at or above $6.80 per share, and on December 8, 2020, the Company provided notice to the holders of the warrants that they had until January 7, 2021 to exercise such warrants, or such warrants would expire pursuant to their terms. From December 9, 2020, to January 7, 2021, ten holders of warrants to purchase an aggregate of 409,029 shares of the Company’s common stock exercised such warrants and paid an aggregate exercise price of $1,677,019 to the Company. In connection with such exercises the Company issued such warrant holders an aggregate of 409,029 shares of restricted common stock.

  

Separately, effective on January 7, 2021, the Board of Directors of the Company agreed to extend the expiration date of warrants to purchase 118,000 shares of common stock, which would have otherwise expired on January 7, 2021, pursuant to the terms of the warrants, to February 8, 2021, which warrants expired unexercised. 

  

On January 20, 2021, the Company sold an aggregate of 1,000,000 units to one investor, with each unit consisting of one share of restricted common stock and one warrant to purchase one share of common stock, at a price of $5.00 per unit. In total the Company raised cash of $4,999,982 pursuant to the private offering of the units. The units were sold pursuant to the entry into a subscription agreement with the investor. The Subscription Agreement provided the investor customary piggyback registration rights (for both the shares and the shares of common stock underlying the warrants) which remain in place for the lesser of one year following the closing of the offering and the date that the investor is eligible to sell the applicable securities under Rule 144 of the Securities Act. Such piggyback registration rights agreements also provided that the Company is not required to register securities in a registration statement relating solely to an offering by the Company of securities for its own account if the managing underwriter or placement agent have advised the Company in writing that the inclusion of such securities would have a material adverse effect upon the ability of the Company to sell securities for its own account.

  

The warrants have an exercise price of $6.00 per share (and no cashless exercise rights), and are exercisable until the earlier of (a) January 14, 2023, and (b) the 30th day after the Company provides the holder of the Warrants notice that the closing sales price of the Company’s common stock has closed at or above $10.00 per share for a period of ten consecutive trading days. The warrants include a beneficial ownership limitation, which limits the exercise of the warrants held by the investor in the event that upon exercise such investor (and any related parties of such investor) would hold more than 4.999% of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock (which percentage may be increased to 9.999% with at least 61 days prior written notice to the Company from the investor).

 

Asset Purchase Agreement

 

On March 1, 2021, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Gamefish Global Pty Ltd, a company incorporated in Australia (“Gamefish”), pursuant to which the Company acquired an instance of certain intellectual property that consists of a fully functional Seamless Aggregation Platform (“Aggregation Platform”). As consideration for the acquisition, the Company agreed to pay Gamefish $174,000, payable pursuant to a schedule set forth in the agreement, and certain milestones being met with respect to the stability, functionality and operation of the Aggregation Platform. The Company also agreed to pay three months of monthly fees to Gamefish in the amount of $13,050 per month, for ongoing support for the intellectual property. The purchase is also contingent on the Company entering into mutually acceptable consulting agreements with two principals of Gamefish.

 

 
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Stock Purchase Agreement

 

On August 10, 2020, the Company entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement with Brett Goodman, the son of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, and Jason Silver, who was then subject to a partnership agreement with Brett Goodman. Mr. Goodman and Mr. Silver had previously engaged a third-party company to develop a Peer-to-Peer betting application and the parties determined it was in the Company’s best interests to assume ownership of the Peer-to-Peer betting application development program, and to engage Mr. Goodman and Mr. Silver for management of the project. Pursuant to the agreement, we agreed to issue each of Mr. Goodman and Mr. Silver 2,000 shares of restricted common stock (4,000 shares in aggregate)(which shares were issued on March 24, 2021), and as a result, a $14,840 expense was recorded. Additionally, each of Mr. Goodman and Mr. Silver agreed to manage the project. We also agreed to reimburse Mr. Goodman and Mr. Silver for the costs of the project; however, there have been no expenses to date.

 

Hopestar Agreement

 

On December 31, 2020, the Company, Articulate and Hopestar Technology Service Co., Ltd (“Hopestar”)(a customer of the Company) entered into an Agreement. Pursuant to the Agreement, Hopestar, which held certain credits which are issued to players who win slot game jackpots distributed by the Company (which are specific to Playtech, who the Company distributes gaming content for), agreed to reduce $500,000 of amounts owed by the Company to Hopestar, Articulate agreed to offer Hopestar $500,000 of gaming credits for alternative content (i.e., games distributed by companies other than Playtech), and Articulate agreed to reduce $500,000 of amounts owed by the Company to Articulate. As of January 31, 2021, the Company had $656,805 of accounts receivable from Articulate and $33,000 of accounts payable to Articulate.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

That there are substantial risks to ownership of our common stock. If any of the following risks were to occur it could materially affect our likelihood of success. If that happens, the market price of our common stock, if any, could decline, and prospective investors would lose all or part of their investment in our common stock.

 

Risks Related to the Company in General

 

We may require additional financing, and we may not be able to raise funds on favorable terms, or at all.

 

We had working capital of $13,261,937 as of January 31, 2021. With our current cash on hand, expected revenues, and based on our current average monthly expenses, we do not anticipate the need for additional funding in order to continue our operations at their current levels, and to pay the costs associated with being a public company, for the next 12 months, but may require additional funding in the future to support our operations and/or may seek to raise additional funding in the future to expand or complete acquisitions.

 

The most likely source of future funds presently available to us will be through the sale of equity capital. We also currently plan to sell equity pursuant to a registration statement in connection with the planned uplisting of our common stock to The NASDAQ Capital Market. Any sale of share capital will result in dilution to existing shareholders. Furthermore, we may incur debt in the future, and may not have sufficient funds to repay our future indebtedness or may default on our future debts, jeopardizing our business viability.

 

We may not be able to borrow or raise additional capital in the future to meet our needs or to otherwise provide the capital necessary to expand our operations and business, which might result in the value of our common stock decreasing in value or becoming worthless. Additional financing may not be available to us on terms that are acceptable. Consequently, we may not be able to proceed with our intended business plans. Obtaining additional financing contains risks, including:

 

 
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additional equity financing may not be available to us on satisfactory terms and any equity we are able to issue could lead to dilution for current shareholders;

 

 

 

 

loans or other debt instruments may have terms and/or conditions, such as interest rate, restrictive covenants and control or revocation provisions, which are not acceptable to management or our directors;

 

 

 

 

the current environment in capital markets combined with our capital constraints may prevent us from being able to obtain adequate debt financing; and

 

 

 

 

 

 

if we fail to obtain required additional financing to grow our business, we would need to delay or scale back our business plan, reduce our operating costs, or reduce our headcount, each of which would have a material adverse effect on our business, future prospects, and financial condition.

 

Global pandemics, such as COVID-19 have had, and could in the future have an adverse impact on our revenue and results of operations.

 

Our business and operations have been and could in the future be adversely affected by health epidemics, such as the global COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to control its spread have curtailed the movement of people, goods and services worldwide, including in the regions in which we and our clients and partners operate, and are significantly impacting economic activity and financial markets. Many customers have decreased or paused their spending as a response to the economic uncertainty, declines in business activity, and other COVID-19-related impacts, which have negatively impacted, and may continue to negatively impact, our revenue and results of operations, the extent and duration of which may not be able to be accurately predicted. In addition, our clients’ businesses or cash flows have been and may continue to be negatively impacted by COVID-19, which has and may continue to lead them to seek adjustments to payment terms or delay making payments or default on their payables, any of which may impact the timely receipt and/or collectability of our receivables.

 

Our operations are subject to a range of external factors related to the COVID-19 pandemic that are not within our control. There can be no assurance that precautionary measures, whether adopted by us or imposed by others, will be effective, and such measures could negatively affect our sales, marketing, and client service efforts, delay and lengthen our sales cycles, decrease our employees’ or clients’ or partners’ productivity, or create operational or other challenges, any of which could harm our business and results of operations.

 

The economic uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has made and may continue to make it difficult for the forecasting of revenue and operating results and to make decisions regarding operational cost structures and investments. The duration and extent of the impact from the COVID-19 pandemic depend on future developments that cannot be accurately predicted at this time, and if we are not able to respond to and manage the impact of such events effectively, our business may be harmed.

 

We may have difficulty obtaining future funding sources, if needed, and we may have to accept terms that would adversely affect shareholders.

 

We will need to raise funds from additional financing in the future to complete our business plan and may need to raise additional funding in the future to support our operations. We have no commitments for any financing (provided that we do plan to complete an underwritten offering of approximately $10 million shares of common stock in the future in connection with the planned uplisting of our common stock to The NASDAQ Capital Market) and any financing commitments (including our planned underwritten offering) may result in dilution to our existing shareholders. We may have difficulty obtaining additional funding, and we may have to accept terms that would adversely affect our shareholders. For example, the terms of any future financings may impose restrictions on our right to declare dividends or on the manner in which we conduct our business. Additionally, we may raise funding by issuing convertible notes, which if converted into shares of our common stock would dilute our then shareholders’ interests. Lending institutions or private investors may impose restrictions on a future decision by us to make capital expenditures, acquisitions, or significant asset sales. If we are unable to raise additional funds, we may be forced to curtail or even abandon our business plan.

 

 
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Because we have a limited operating history our future operations may not result in profitable operations.

 

There is no significant operating history upon which to base any assumption as to the likelihood that we will prove successful, and we may never achieve profitable operations. If we are unsuccessful in addressing these risks, our business will most likely fail. Revenues from related party were $2,248,877, $2,167,773, $1,087,816, $1,349,485, $2,429,442 and $915,804 for the calendar years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Revenues from third parties were $2,974,182, $1,120,802, $670,783, $2,752, $452,771 and $0 for the calendar years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The increase of total revenue can be attributed to the increasing registered end-users from our third party customers and new revenue stream starting from this year. We may not generate profitable operations in the future to ensure our continuation.

 

The Company’s planned Player2P gaming product may not receive regulatory approvals.

 

The Company has developed its own proprietary Peer-to-Peer E-sports gaming product, which is expected to launch in the coming months. This product will be marketed as the Player2P Platform (“Player2P”). The Player2P brand will be focused solely on esports gambling and 18+ gaming (i.e., gaming by those 18 years of age and older). Player2P is expected to not only offer users traditional casino style games but allow players to compete against each other while playing E-sport console games. In addition to launching the Player2P product into our existing distribution network, we will aim to launch this business-to-consumer (B2C) platform into selected States in the U.S., subject to regulatory approvals. The Company plans to launch Player2P games as an E-sport skill game wherein competitive contestants compete against live opponents in video games, either online or in-person with real money at stake, subject to compliance with applicable law, and approval from applicable authorities. In the event Player2P does not receive regulatory approvals we may be unable to launch Player2P in the U.S. or other jurisdictions, or such launch might be impractical, which would ultimately cause such product not to be successful. In such case the funds used by the Company to develop such game may be lost, which may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and/or prospects, and ultimately the value of our securities.

 

We rely on our management and if they were to leave our company our business plan could be adversely affected.

 

We are largely dependent upon the personal efforts and abilities of our existing management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Anthony Brian Goodman, who plays an active role in our operations. Moving forward, should the services of Mr. Goodman be lost for any reason, the Company will incur costs associated with recruiting replacements and any potential delays in operations which this may cause. If we are unable to replace such individual with a suitably trained alternative individual(s), we may be forced to scale back or curtail our business plan.

 

We do not currently have any key person life insurance policies on our executive officers. If our executive officers do not devote sufficient time towards our business, we may never be able to effectuate our business plan.

 

Our executive officer controls a majority of our voting securities and therefore has the ability to influence matters affecting our shareholders.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Anthony Brian Goodman, beneficially owns approximately 99.98% of our voting shares. As a result, he has the ability to influence matters affecting our shareholders and will therefore exercise control in determining the outcome of all corporate transactions or other matters, including the election of directors, mergers, consolidations, the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, the power to prevent or cause a change in control and to determine the outcome of most matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders.

 

 
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Any investor who purchases shares will be a minority shareholder and as such will have little to no say in the direction of the Company and the election of directors. Additionally, it will be difficult if not impossible for investors to remove our current directors, which will mean they will remain in control of who serves as officers of the Company as well as whether any changes are made in the Board of Directors. As a potential investor in the Company, you should keep in mind that even if you own shares of the Company’s common stock and wish to vote them at annual or special shareholder meetings, your shares will likely have little effect on the outcome of corporate decisions. Because of Mr. Goodman’s voting control, investors may find it difficult to replace our management if they disagree with the way our business is being operated. Additionally, the interests of Mr. Goodman may differ from the interests of the other shareholders and thus result in corporate decisions that are averse to other shareholders. This concentrated control limits or severely restricts other shareholders’ ability to influence corporate matters and Mr. Goodman may take actions that some of our shareholders do not view as beneficial, each of which could reduce the market price of our securities.

 

Economic downturns and market conditions beyond our control could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business depends on the overall demand for gaming platforms, systems and gaming content and other technology offerings, on the economic health of customers that benefit from our products. Economic downturns or unstable market conditions may cause customers to decrease or pause their acquisition budgets, which could reduce spending on our products and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Similarly, economic downturns could also decrease the amount of disposable income end-users have available for gaming platforms, systems and gaming content. Additionally, as described above, public health crises may disrupt the operations of our customers and partners for an unknown period of time, including as a result of travel restrictions and/or business shutdowns, all of which could negatively impact their business and results of operations, including cash flows.

 

If we are unable to protect our proprietary information or other intellectual property, our business could be adversely affected.

 

We rely to a significant degree on trade secret laws to protect our proprietary information and technology. Breaches of the security of our data center systems and infrastructure or other IT resources could result in the exposure of our proprietary information. Additionally, our trade secrets may be independently developed by competitors. The steps we have taken to protect our trade secrets and proprietary information may not prevent unauthorized use or reverse engineering of our trade secrets or proprietary information. Additionally, to the extent that we have not registered the copyrights in any of our copyrightable works, we will need to register the copyrights before we can file an infringement suit in the United States (or another jurisdiction), and our remedies in any such infringement suit may be limited.

 

Effective protection of our intellectual property rights may require additional filings and applications in the future. However, pending and future applications may not be approved, and any of our existing or future patents, trademarks or other intellectual property rights may not provide sufficient protection for our business as currently conducted or may be challenged by others or invalidated through administrative process or litigation. Additionally, patent rights in the United States have switched from the former “first-to-invent” system to a “first-to-file” system, which may favor larger competitors that have the resources to file more patent applications. Additionally, to the extent that our employees, contractors or other third parties with whom we do business use intellectual property owned by others in their work for us, disputes may arise as to the rights to such intellectual property.

 

Further, the laws of certain countries do not protect proprietary rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States and, therefore, in certain jurisdictions, we may be unable to protect our proprietary technology adequately against unauthorized third party copying, infringement or use, which could adversely affect our competitive position.

 

 
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To protect or enforce our intellectual property rights, we may initiate litigation against third parties. Any lawsuits that we initiate could be expensive, take significant time and divert management’s attention from other business concerns. Additionally, we may unintentionally provoke third parties to assert claims against us. These claims could invalidate or narrow the scope of our intellectual property. We may not prevail in any lawsuits that we may initiate and the damages or other remedies awarded, if any, may not be commercially valuable. Accordingly, despite our efforts, we may be unable to prevent third parties from infringing upon or misappropriating our intellectual property. The occurrence of any of these events may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may suffer if it is alleged or determined that our technology or another aspect of our business infringes on the intellectual property rights of others.

 

The gaming platforms, systems and gaming content industries are characterized by the existence of large numbers of patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets and other intellectual property and proprietary rights. Companies in these industries are often required to defend against litigation claims that are based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. Our technologies may not be able to withstand any third-party claims or rights against their use.

 

Our success depends, in part, upon the non-infringement of intellectual property rights owned by others and being able to resolve claims of intellectual property infringement or misappropriation without major financial expenditures or adverse consequences. From time to time, we may be the subject of claims that our solutions and underlying technology infringe or violate the intellectual property rights of others.

 

Regardless of whether claims against us have any merit, these claims will likely be time-consuming and costly to evaluate and defend, and the outcome of any litigation is inherently uncertain. Some of our competitors have substantially greater resources than we do and are able to sustain the costs of complex intellectual property litigation to a greater degree and for longer periods of time than we could. Claims that we are infringing on patents or other intellectual property rights could:

 

 

subject us to significant liabilities for monetary damages, which may be tripled in certain instances;

 

 

 

 

prohibit us from developing, commercializing or continuing to provide some or all of our offerings unless we obtain licenses from, and pay royalties to, the holders of the patents or other intellectual property rights, who may not be willing to offer them on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all;

 

 

 

 

subject us to indemnification obligations or obligations to refund fees to, and adversely affect our relationships with, our then clients, customers and partners;

 

 

 

 

cause delays or stoppages in providing offerings;

 

 

 

 

cause clients, potential clients, and partners to avoid working with us;

 

 

 

 

divert the attention and resources of management and technical personnel;

 

 

 

 

harm our reputation; and

 

 

 

 

require technology or branding changes to our offerings that could cause us to incur substantial costs.

 

A significant amount of our revenues come from related parties and only a limited number of customers, and if we were to lose any of those customers, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

At the present time, we are dependent on a limited number of customers for all of our business, revenue and results of operations, the most significant of which is a related party. The Company’s major revenues for the year ended January 31, 2021, were from three customers, one of which was Articulate (a related party which is beneficially owned by Anthony Brian Goodman, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, and his wife). Revenues from related party were $2,248,877, $2,167,773, $1,087,816, $1,349,485, $2,429,442 and $915,804 for the calendar years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Revenues from third parties were $2,974,182, $1,120,802, $670,783, $2,752, $452,771 and $0 for the calendar years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. As of January 31, 2021, the Company had a $656,805 receivable from Articulate.

 

 
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As a result, the majority of our revenues have historically been due to only two customers, including Articulate, which is a related party, provided that we have recently expanded our customer base. As a result, in the event our customers do not pay us amounts owed, terminate work in progress or we are unable to find new customers moving forward, it could have a materially adverse effect on our results of operations and could force us to curtail or abandon our current business operations. Additionally, Mr. Goodman, who controls Articulate, may have conflicts of interest, or perceived conflicts of interest with the Company and/or its shareholders, and any change in the terms of the Company’s agreements or understandings with Articulate may have a material adverse effect on the Company and the value of its securities.

 

If we are not able to compete effectively against companies with greater resources, our prospects for future success will be jeopardized.

 

The gaming platforms, systems and gaming content industries are highly competitive. We compete with numerous local competitors for such services. Many of our competitors are larger, more established companies with greater resources to devote to marketing, as well as greater brand recognition. Moreover, if one or more of our competitors or suppliers were to merge, the change in the competitive landscape could adversely affect our competitive position. Additionally, to the extent that competition in our markets intensifies, we may be required to reduce our prices in order to remain competitive. If we do not compete effectively, or if we reduce our prices without making commensurate reductions in our costs, our net sales, margins, and profitability and our future prospects for success may be harmed.

 

Changes in ownership of competitors or consolidations within the gaming industry may negatively impact pricing and lead to downward pricing pressures which could reduce revenue.

 

A decline in demand for our products in the gaming industry could adversely affect our business. Demand for our products is driven primarily by the replacement of existing services as well as the expansion of existing online gaming, and the expansion of new channels of distribution, such as mobile gaming. Additionally, consolidation within the online gambling market could result in us facing competition from larger combined entities, which may benefit from greater resources and economies of scale. Also, any fragmentation within the industry creating a number of smaller, independent operators with fewer resources could also adversely affect our business as these operators might cause a further slowdown in the replacement cycle for our products.

 

We have identified material weaknesses in our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. If not remediated, our failure to establish and maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting could result in material misstatements in our financial statements and a failure to meet our reporting and financial obligations, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and the trading price of our common stock.

 

Maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and effective disclosure controls and procedures are necessary for us to produce reliable financial statements. Our management has determined that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of January 31, 2021, and such controls and procedures have not been effective for several years. Separately, management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2021, and determined that such internal control over financial reporting was not effective as a result of such assessment.

 

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. A control deficiency exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent or detect misstatements on a timely basis.

 

 
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Maintaining effective disclosure controls and procedures and effective internal control over financial reporting are necessary for us to produce reliable financial statements and the Company is committed to remediating its material weaknesses in such controls as promptly as possible. However, there can be no assurance as to when these material weaknesses will be remediated or that additional material weaknesses will not arise in the future. Any failure to remediate the material weaknesses, or the development of new material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, could result in material misstatements in our financial statements and cause us to fail to meet our reporting and financial obligations, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and the trading price of our common stock, and/or result in litigation against us or our management. In addition, even if we are successful in strengthening our controls and procedures, those controls and procedures may not be adequate to prevent or identify irregularities or facilitate the fair presentation of our financial statements or our periodic reports filed with the SEC.

 

Risks Related to Our Industry

 

We operate in a rapidly evolving industry and if we fail to successfully develop, market or sell new products or adopt new technology, it could materially adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our software products compete in a market characterized by rapid technological advances, evolving standards in software technology and frequent new product introductions and enhancements that may render existing products and services obsolete. Competitors are continuously upgrading their product offerings with new features, functions and content. In addition, we attempt to continuously refine our software and technology offerings to address regulatory changes in the markets in which we operate and plan to operate. In order to remain competitive, we will need to continuously modify and enhance our technology platform and service offerings. We may not be able to respond to rapid technological changes in our industry. In addition, the introduction of new products or updated versions of existing products has inherent risks, including, but not limited to, risks concerning:

 

 

product quality, including the possibility of software defects, which could result in claims against us or the inability to sell our products;

 

 

 

 

the accuracy of our estimates of customer demand, and the fit of the new products and features with a customer’s needs;

 

 

 

 

the need to educate our personnel to work with the new products and features, which may strain our resources and lengthen sales;

 

 

 

 

market acceptance of initial product releases; and

 

 

 

 

competitor product introductions or regulatory changes that render our new products obsolete.

 

We cannot assure you that we will be successful in creating new technology for our products in the future. We may encounter errors resulting from a significant rewrite of the software code. In addition, as we transition to newer technology platforms for our products, our customers may encounter difficulties in the upgrade process, which could cause them to lose revenue or review their alternatives with a competing supplier.

 

Developing, enhancing and localizing software is expensive, and the investment in product development may involve a long payback cycle. Our future plans include additional investments in development of our software and other intellectual property. We believe that we must continue to dedicate a significant amount of resources to our development efforts to maintain our competitive position. However, we may not receive significant revenue from these investments for several years, if at all. In addition, as we or our competitors introduce new or enhanced products, the demand for our products, particularly older versions of our products may decline.

 

 
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The online gaming industry is highly competitive, and if we fail to compete effectively, we could experience price reductions, reduced margins or loss of revenues.

 

The online gaming industry is highly competitive. A number of companies offer products that are similar to our products and target the same markets as we do. Certain of our current and potential competitors have longer operating histories, significantly greater financial, technical and marketing resources, greater name recognition, broader or more integrated product offerings, larger technical staffs and a larger installed customer base than we do. These competitors may be able to respond more quickly to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements, develop superior products, and devote greater resources to the development, promotion and sale of their products than we can.

 

Because of the rapid growth of our industry, and the relatively low capital barriers to entry in the software industry, we expect additional competition from other established and emerging companies. Additionally, as our customers become more experienced or successful, they may look to develop their own proprietary solutions or may look more aggressively at competing platforms. Additionally, our competitors could combine or merge to become more formidable competitors or may adapt more quickly than we can to new technologies, evolving industry trends and changing customer requirements. If we fail to compete effectively, (a) we could be compelled to reduce prices in order to be competitive, which could reduce margins, or (b) we would lose market share, any of which could materially adversely affect our strategy, our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Competition within the global entertainment and gaming industries is intense and our existing and future offerings may not be able to compete against other competing forms of entertainment such as television, movies and sporting events, as well as other entertainment and gaming options on the Internet. If our offerings do not continue to be popular, our business could be harmed.

 

We operate in the global entertainment and gaming industries. The users of our offerings face a vast array of entertainment choices. Other forms of entertainment, such as television, movies, sporting events and in-person casinos, are more well established and may be perceived by our users to offer greater variety, affordability, interactivity and enjoyment. Our products compete with these other forms of entertainment for the discretionary time and income of end users. If we are unable to sustain sufficient interest in our products and offerings in comparison to other forms of entertainment, including new forms of entertainment, our business model may not continue to be viable.

 

A reduction in discretionary consumer spending, from an economic downturn or disruption of financial markets or other factors, could negatively impact our financial performance.

 

Gaming and other leisure activities that our customers offer represent discretionary expenditures and players’ participation in those activities may decline if discretionary consumer spending declines, including during economic downturns, when consumers generally earn less disposable income. Changes in discretionary consumer spending or consumer preferences are driven by factors beyond our control, such as:

 

 

perceived or actual general economic conditions;

 

 

 

 

fears of recession and changes in consumer confidence in the economy;

 

 

 

 

high energy, fuel and other commodity costs;

 

 

 

 

the potential for bank failures or other financial crises;

 

 

 

 

a soft job market;

 

 

 

 

an actual or perceived decrease in disposable consumer income and wealth;

 

 

 

 

increases in taxes, including gaming taxes or fees; and

 

 

 

 

terrorist attacks or other global events.

 

 
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During periods of economic contraction, our revenues may decrease while most of our costs remain fixed and some costs even increase, resulting in decreased earnings.

 

We face the risk of fraud, theft, and cheating.

 

We face the risk that third-parties, employees or consultants may attempt or commit fraud or theft or cheat using our products. Such risks include backdoors, nefarious code and other efforts. Failure to discover such acts or schemes in a timely manner could result in losses in our operations and those of our customers. Negative publicity related to such acts or schemes could have an adverse effect on our reputation, potentially causing a material adverse effect on our business.

 

We face cyber security risks that could result in damage to our reputation and/or subject us to fines, payment of damages, lawsuits and restrictions on our use of data.

 

Our information systems and data, including those we maintain with our third-party service providers, may be subject to cyber security breaches in the future. Computer programmers and hackers may be able to penetrate our network security and misappropriate, copy or pirate our confidential information or that of third parties, create system disruptions or cause interruptions or shutdowns of our internal systems and services. Our website may become subject to denial-of-service attacks, where a website is bombarded with information requests eventually causing the website to overload, resulting in a delay or disruption of service. Computer programmers and hackers also may be able to develop and deploy viruses, worms and other malicious software programs that attack our products or otherwise exploit any security vulnerabilities of our products. Also, there is a growing trend of advanced persistent threats being launched by organized and coordinated groups against corporate networks to breach security for malicious purposes.

 

The techniques used to obtain unauthorized, improper, or illegal access to our systems, our data or customers’ data, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems are constantly evolving and have become increasingly complex and sophisticated, may be difficult to detect quickly, and often are not recognized or detected until after they have been launched. Although we have developed systems and processes designed to protect our data and customer data and to prevent data loss and other security breaches and expect to continue to expend significant resources to bolster these protections, there can be no assurance that these security measures will provide absolute security.

 

Disruptions in the availability of our computer systems, through cyber-attacks or otherwise, could damage our computer or telecommunications systems, impact our ability to service our customers, adversely affect our operations and the results of operations, and have an adverse effect on our reputation. The costs to us to eliminate or alleviate security problems, bugs, viruses, worms, malicious software programs and security vulnerabilities could be significant, and the efforts to address these problems could result in interruptions, delays, cessation of service and loss of existing or potential customers and may impede our sales, distribution and other critical functions. We may also be subject to regulatory penalties and litigation by customers and other parties whose information has been compromised, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Systems failures and resulting interruptions in the availability of our websites, applications, products, or services could harm our business.

 

Our systems may experience service interruptions or degradation because of hardware and software defects or malfunctions, distributed denial-of-service and other cyberattacks, human error, earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, fires, and other natural disasters, power losses, disruptions in telecommunications services, fraud, military or political conflicts, terrorist attacks, computer viruses or other malware, or other events. Some of our systems are not fully redundant, and our disaster recovery planning may not be sufficient for all eventualities.

 

 
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A prolonged interruption in the availability or reduction in the availability, speed, or functionality of our products and services will result in a loss of revenue and could materially harm our business. Frequent or persistent interruptions in our services could cause current or potential customers to believe that our systems are unreliable, leading them to switch to our competitors or to avoid or reduce the use of our products and services, and could permanently harm our reputation and brands. Moreover, if any system failure or similar event results in damages to our customers or their business partners, these customers or partners could seek significant compensation or contractual penalties from us for their losses, and those claims, even if unsuccessful, would likely be time-consuming and costly for us to address.

 

The full-time availability and expeditious delivery of our products and services is a critical part of our offerings to our consumers. We continually refine our technology, implementing system upgrades. Despite network security, disaster recovery and systems management measures in place, we may encounter unexpected general systems outages or failures that may affect our ability to conduct development activities, provide maintenance services for our products, manage our contractual arrangements, accurately and efficiently maintain our books and records, record our transactions, provide critical information to our management and prepare our consolidated financial statements. Additionally, these unexpected systems outages or failures may require additional personnel and financial resources, disrupt our business or cause delays in the reporting of our financial results. We may also be required to modify, enhance, upgrade or implement new systems, procedures and controls to reflect changes in our business or technological advancements, which could cause us to incur additional costs and require additional management attention, placing burdens on our internal resources.

 

We also rely on facilities, components, and services supplied by third parties, including data center facilities and cloud storage services. If these third parties cease to provide the facilities or services, experience operational interference or disruptions, breach their agreements with us, fail to perform their obligations and meet our expectations, or experience a cybersecurity incident, our operations could be disrupted or otherwise negatively affected, which could result in customer dissatisfaction and damage to our reputation and brands, and materially and adversely affect our business. We do not carry business interruption insurance sufficient to compensate us for all losses that may result from interruptions in our service as a result of systems failures and similar events.

 

A significant portion of our employees, consultants and operations are located outside of the U.S. and in many different foreign locations.

 

We have consultants and staff located in multiple countries and a significant level of operations outside of the U.S. A significant portion of our operations are located outside of the U.S. We have software development, customer support and sales centers in Philippines, Australia, and Taiwan, which account for most of our software development support and sales personnel. The fact that all our employees and consultants are not located in one place subjects us to additional costs and risks that could adversely affect our operating results.

 

We have business operations located in non-U.S. countries which subject us to additional costs and risks that could adversely affect our operating results.

 

Certain of our operations are in, and sales take place outside of, the U.S. Compliance with international and U.S. laws and regulations that apply to our international operations increases our cost of doing business. As a result of our international operations, we are subject to a variety of risks and challenges in managing an organization operating in various countries, including those related to:

 

 

challenges caused by distance as well as language and cultural differences;

 

general economic conditions in each country or region;

 

regulatory changes;

 

political unrest, terrorism and the potential for other hostilities;

 

public health risks, particularly in areas in which we have significant operations;

 

longer payment cycles and difficulties in collecting accounts receivable;

 

difficulties in transferring funds from certain countries;

 

laws such as the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 and the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and local laws which also prohibit corrupt payments to governmental officials; and

 

reduced protection for intellectual property rights in some countries.

 

 
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If we are unable to expand or adequately staff and manage our existing development operations located outside of the U.S., we may not realize, in whole or in part, the anticipated benefits from these initiatives (including lower development expenses), which in turn could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Our results of operations may be adversely affected by fluctuations in currency values.

 

We receive revenues and expend expenses in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Changes in the value of the currencies which we receive revenues and pay expenses, versus each other, and the U.S. dollar, could result in an adverse charge being recorded to our income statement. Our currency remeasurement gains and losses are charged against earnings in the period incurred.

 

We depend on the services of key personnel to execute our business strategy. If we lose the services of our key personnel or are unable to attract and retain other qualified personnel, we may be unable to operate our business effectively.

 

We believe that the future success of our business depends on the services of a number of key management and operating personnel. Some of these key employees have strong relationships with our customers and our business may be harmed if these employees leave us. In addition, our ability to manage our growth depends, in part, on our ability to identify, hire and retain additional qualified employees. We face intense competition for qualified individuals from numerous technologies, software and service companies. If we are unsuccessful in attracting and retaining these key management and operating personnel our ability to operate our business effectively could be negatively impacted and our business, operating results and financial condition would be materially adversely affected.

 

We rely on third party cloud services and such providers or services have in the past, and may in the future, encounter technical problems and service interruptions.

 

We host our customers’ iGaming operations on a combination of proprietary and cloud servers including the Amazon Elastic Compute (EC2) Server. Such servers may in the future experience slower response times or interruptions as a result of increased traffic or other reasons. Additionally, we currently host our GM-X system on Amazon Web Services (“AWS”), a third-party provider of cloud infrastructure services. We do not, and will not, have control over the operations of the facilities or infrastructure of the third-party service providers that we use. Such third parties’ facilities are vulnerable to damage or interruption from natural disasters, cybersecurity attacks, terrorist attacks, power outages and similar events or acts of misconduct. Our platform’s continuing and uninterrupted performance will be critical to our success. We have experienced, and we expect that in the future we will experience, interruptions, delays and outages in service and availability from these third-party service providers from time to time due to a variety of factors, including infrastructure changes, human or software errors, website hosting disruptions and capacity constraints. In addition, any changes in these third parties’ service levels may adversely affect our ability to meet the requirements of our users. Since our platform’s continuing and uninterrupted performance is critical to our success, sustained or repeated system failures would reduce the attractiveness of our offerings. It may become increasingly difficult to maintain and improve our performance, especially during peak usage times, as we expand and the usage of our offerings increases. Any negative publicity arising from these disruptions could harm our reputation and brand and may adversely affect the usage of our offerings. Any of the above circumstances or events may harm our reputation, reduce the availability or usage of our platform, lead to a significant loss of revenue, increase our costs and impair our ability to attract new customers any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

 
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We may be liable for product defects or other claims relating to our products.

 

Our products could be defective, fail to perform as designed or otherwise cause harm to our customers, their equipment or their products. If any of our products are defective, we may be required to recall the products and/or repair or replace them, which could result in substantial expenses and affect our profitability. Any problem with the performance of our products, could harm our reputation, which could result in a loss of sales to customers and/or potential customers. In addition, the occurrence of errors in, or fraudulent manipulation of, our products or software may give rise to claims by our customers or by our customers’ patrons, including claims by our customers for lost revenues and related litigation that could result in significant liability. Any claims brought against us by customers may result in diversion of management’s time and attention, expenditure of large amounts of cash on legal fees and payment of damages, lower demand for our products or services, or injury to our reputation. Our insurance, if any, may not sufficiently cover a judgment against us or a settlement payment and is subject to customary deductibles, limits and exclusions. In addition, a judgment against us or a settlement could make it difficult for us to obtain insurance in the coverage amounts necessary to adequately insure our businesses, or at all, and could materially increase our insurance premiums and deductibles. In addition, software bugs or malfunctions, errors in distribution or installation of our software, failure of our products to perform as approved by the appropriate regulatory bodies or other errors or malfunctions, may subject us to investigation or other action by gaming regulatory authorities, including fines.

 

Risks Related to Regulation

 

Our products are generally part of new and evolving industries, which presents significant uncertainty and business risks.

 

The gaming platforms, systems and gaming content industries are relatively new and continue to evolve. Whether these industries grow and whether our business will ultimately succeed, will be affected by, among other things, mobile platforms, legal and regulatory developments (such as passing new laws or regulations or extending existing laws or regulations to online gaming and related activities), taxation of gaming activities, data and information privacy and payment processing laws and regulations, and other factors that we are unable to predict and which are beyond our control.

 

Given the dynamic evolution of these industries, it can be difficult to plan strategically, including as it relates to product launches in new or existing jurisdictions which may be delayed or denied, and it is possible that competitors will be more successful than we are at adapting to change and pursuing business opportunities. Additionally, as the online gaming industry advances, including with respect to regulation in new and existing jurisdictions, we may become subject to additional compliance-related costs, including regulatory infractions, licensing and taxes. If our product offerings do not obtain popularity or maintain popularity, or if they fail to grow in a manner that meets our expectations, or if we cannot offer our product offerings in particular jurisdictions that may be material to our business, then our results of operations and financial condition could be harmed.

 

We are subject to various laws relating to trade, export controls, and foreign corrupt practices, the violation of which could adversely affect our operations, reputation, business, prospects, operating results and financial condition.

 

We are subject to risks associated with doing business outside of the United States, including exposure to complex foreign and U.S. regulations such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) and other anti-corruption laws which generally prohibit U.S. companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Violations of the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws may result in severe criminal and civil sanctions and other penalties. It may be difficult to oversee the conduct of any contractors, third party partners, representatives or agents who are not our employees, potentially exposing us to greater risk from their actions. If our employees or agents fail to comply with applicable laws or company policies governing our international operations, we may face legal proceedings and actions which could result in civil penalties, administration actions and criminal sanctions. Any determination that we have violated any anti-corruption laws could have a material adverse impact on our business. Changes in trade sanctions laws may restrict our business practices, including cessation of business activities in sanctioned countries or with sanctioned entities.

 

 
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Violations of these laws and regulations could result in significant fines, criminal sanctions against the Company, its officers or its employees, requirements to obtain export licenses, disgorgement of profits, cessation of business activities in sanctioned countries, prohibitions on the conduct of its business and its inability to market and sell the Company’s products in one or more countries. Additionally, any such violations could materially damage the Company’s reputation, brand, international expansion efforts, ability to attract and retain employees and the Company’s business, prospects, operating results and financial condition.

 

We also deal with significant amounts of cash in our operations and are subject to various reporting and anti-money laundering regulations. Any violation of anti-money laundering laws or regulations by any of our properties could have a material adverse impact on our business.

 

The Company’s ability to operate in the U.S. is currently, and may continue to be, limited.

 

According to a November 2020 article from Espn.com (United States of sports betting: An updated map of where every state stands), there are currently 20 U.S. states that allow online sports betting (through approved and regulated betting portals), and according to bettingusa.com, there are five states (Delaware, Nevada, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia), where online casino games, online poker, or both are currently legal (again, through approved and regulated betting portals). As a result, the current U.S. market for the Company’s products and services is limited; however, the Company hopes that more U.S. states will pass laws in the upcoming months and years to legalize more forms of online gambling. Until such time as those laws are passed, if ever, the Company anticipates the majority of its revenues coming from Asia, South America, Europe, Africa and Latin America. In the event that more U.S. states do not adopt more favorable online gaming laws in the future, the federal government prohibits online gaming, or the current states that allow for online gaming change or restrict their current laws, it could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s ability to generate revenues and operate in the U.S., which could cause the value of its securities to decline in value or become worthless.

 

Failure to comply with regulatory requirements in a particular jurisdiction, or the failure to successfully obtain a license or permit applied for in a particular jurisdiction, could impact our ability to comply with licensing and regulatory requirements in other jurisdictions, or could cause the rejection of license applications or cancelation of existing licenses in other jurisdictions.

 

Compliance with the various regulations applicable to online gaming is costly and time-consuming. Regulatory authorities at the federal, state and local levels (both in the U.S. and in foreign jurisdictions) have broad powers with respect to the regulation and licensing of real money online gaming operations and may revoke, suspend, condition or limit our licenses, or those of our customers, impose substantial fines on us or our customers, and take other actions, any one of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. These laws and regulations are dynamic and subject to potentially differing interpretations, and various legislative and regulatory bodies may expand current laws or regulations or enact new laws and regulations regarding these matters. We will strive to comply with all applicable laws and regulations relating to our business. It is possible, however, that these requirements may be interpreted and applied in a manner that is inconsistent from one jurisdiction to another and may conflict with other rules. Non-compliance with any such law or regulations could expose us or our customers to claims, proceedings, litigation and investigations by private parties and regulatory authorities, as well as substantial fines and negative publicity, each of which may materially and adversely affect our business and/or those of our customers.

 

 
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Our or our customers’ gaming licenses could be revoked, suspended or conditioned at any time. The loss of a license in one jurisdiction could trigger the loss of a license or affect our (or our customer’s) eligibility for such a license in another jurisdiction, and any of such losses, or potential for such loss, could cause us to cease offering some or all of our offerings in the impacted jurisdictions or cause any of our customers to cease offering our products in those jurisdictions. We and our customers may be unable to obtain or maintain all necessary registrations, licenses, permits or approvals, and could incur fines or experience delays related to the licensing process, which could adversely affect our operations or those of our customers. Our delay or failure to obtain or maintain licenses in any jurisdiction may prevent us from distributing our offerings, increasing our customer base and/or generating revenues. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain and maintain the licenses and related approvals necessary to conduct our iGaming operations. Any failure by us or our customers to maintain or renew existing licenses, registrations, permits or approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

 

Our product offerings must be approved in most regulated jurisdictions in which they are offered; this process cannot be assured or guaranteed.

 

If we fail to obtain necessary gaming licenses in a given jurisdiction, we would likely be prohibited from distributing and providing our product offerings in that particular jurisdiction. If we fail to seek, do not receive, or receive a suspension or revocation of a license in a particular jurisdiction for our product offerings (including any related technology and software) then we cannot offer the same in that jurisdiction and our gaming licenses in other jurisdictions may be impacted. Furthermore, some jurisdictions require license holders to obtain government approval before engaging in some transactions. We may not be able to obtain all necessary licenses in a timely manner, or at all. Delays in regulatory approvals or failure to obtain such approvals may also serve as a barrier to entry to the market for our product offerings. If we are unable to overcome the barriers to entry, it will materially affect our results of operations and future prospects.

 

To the extent new online gaming jurisdictions are established or expanded, we cannot guarantee we will be successful in penetrating such new jurisdictions or expanding our business or customer base in line with the growth of existing jurisdictions. As we directly or indirectly enter into new markets, we may encounter legal, regulatory and political challenges that are difficult or impossible to foresee and which could result in an unforeseen adverse impact on planned revenues or costs associated with the new market opportunity. If we are unable to effectively develop and operate directly or indirectly within these new markets or if our competitors are able to successfully penetrate geographic markets that we cannot access or where we face other restrictions, then our business, operating results and financial condition could be impaired. Our failure to obtain or maintain the necessary regulatory approvals in jurisdictions, whether individually or collectively, would have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Our business is vulnerable to changing economic conditions and to other factors that adversely affect the industries in which we operate.

 

The demand for entertainment and leisure activities tends to be highly sensitive to changes in consumers’ disposable income, and thus can be affected by changes in the economy and consumer tastes, both of which are difficult to predict and beyond the control of the Company. Unfavorable changes in general economic conditions, including recessions, economic slowdown, sustained high levels of unemployment, and increasing fuel or transportation costs, may reduce customers’ disposable income or result in fewer individuals visiting casinos, whether land-based or online, or otherwise engaging in entertainment and leisure activities, including gaming. As a result, the Company cannot ensure that demand for its products or services will remain constant. Continued or renewed adverse developments affecting economies throughout the world, including a general tightening of availability of credit, decreased liquidity in many financial markets, increasing interest rates, increasing energy costs, acts of war or terrorism, transportation disruptions, natural disasters, declining consumer confidence, sustained high levels of unemployment or significant declines in stock markets, all of which may be caused by, or exacerbated by, the COVID-19 pandemic, could lead to a further reduction in discretionary spending on leisure activities, such as gaming. Any significant or prolonged decrease in consumer spending on entertainment or leisure activities could reduce the Company’s online games, reducing the Company’s cash flows and revenues. If the Company experiences a significant unexpected decrease in demand for its products, it could incur losses.

 

 
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Legislative and regulatory changes could negatively affect our business and the business of our customers.

 

Legislative and regulatory changes may affect demand for or place limitations on the placement of our products. Such changes could affect us in a variety of ways. Legislation or regulation may introduce limitations on our products or opportunities for the use of our products and could foster competitive products or solutions at our or our customers’ expense. Our business will likely also suffer if our products became obsolete due to changes in laws or the regulatory framework.

 

Legislative or regulatory changes negatively impacting the gaming industry as a whole or our customers in particular could also decrease the demand for our products. Opposition to gaming could result in restrictions or even prohibitions of gaming operations in any jurisdiction or could result in increased taxes on gaming revenues. Tax matters, including changes in state, federal or other tax legislation or assessments by tax authorities could have a negative impact on our business. A reduction in growth of the gaming industry or in the number of gaming jurisdictions or delays in the opening of new or expanded casinos could reduce demand for our products. Changes in current or future laws or regulations or future judicial intervention in any particular jurisdiction may have a material adverse effect on our existing and proposed foreign and domestic operations. Any such adverse change in the legislative or regulatory environment could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

Gaming opponents may persist in their efforts to curtail the expansion of legalized gaming, which, if successful, could limit the growth of our operations.

 

There is significant debate over, and opposition to, land-based and interactive gaming. We cannot assure that this opposition will not succeed in preventing the legalization of gaming in jurisdictions where it is presently prohibited, prohibiting or limiting the expansion of gaming where it is currently permitted or causing the repeal of legalized gaming in any jurisdiction. Any successful effort to curtail the expansion of, or limit or prohibit, legalized gaming could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

In addition, there is significant opposition in some jurisdictions to gaming (online or otherwise). Such opposition could lead these jurisdictions to adopt legislation or impose a regulatory framework to govern interactive gaming specifically. These could result in a prohibition on gaming or increase our costs to comply with these regulations, all of which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

Regulators and investors may perceive gaming software suppliers and operators similarly, and consider their respective regulatory risk to be similar.

 

While operators that directly provide wagering services to their customers are generally perceived to be exposed to a greater degree of enforcement risk than their suppliers, in some jurisdictions laws extend to directly impact such suppliers. Furthermore, a supplier’s nexus with a particular jurisdiction may expose it to specific enforcement risks, irrespective of whether there has been an attempt to bring proceedings against any supported operator. In some circumstances, enforcement proceedings brought against an operator may result in action being taken against a supplier (and even brought in the absence of the former).

 

Ultimately, the market may view, or in the future may view, the regulatory risk associated with the business of supplying software and services to gaming operators as being comparable with the regulatory risk attaching to operators themselves. In such circumstances, there is an associated risk that investors may apply valuation methods to any such supplier that are the same as the valuation methods used to value operators, and which build in the same regulatory risk even though, in many territories, such suppliers would be considered sufficiently removed from the transactional activity to warrant the application of a discrete risk analysis.

 

 
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Risks Relating to our Common Stock

 

Nevada law and our articles of incorporation authorize us to issue shares of stock, which shares may cause substantial dilution to our existing shareholders.

 

We have authorized capital stock consisting of 40,000,000 shares of common stock, $0.00001 par value per share and 20,000,000 shares of preferred stock, $0.00001 par value per share. As of the date of this Report, we have 23,289,273 shares of common stock issued and outstanding and 1,000 shares of Series B Voting Preferred Stock issued and outstanding. The holder of the shares of the Series B Voting Preferred Stock (currently Luxor, which is wholly-owned by Anthony Brian Goodman, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman) has the right to vote those shares of the Series B Voting Preferred Stock regarding any matter or action that is required to be submitted to the shareholders of the Company for approval. The vote of each share of the Series B Voting Preferred Stock (i.e., each 1,000 shares) is equal to and counted as 4 times the votes of all of the shares of the Company’s (i) common stock, and (ii) other voting preferred stock issued and outstanding on the date of each and every vote or consent of the shareholders of the Company regarding each and every matter submitted to the shareholders of the Company for approval. As such, the Series B Voting Preferred Stock in effect votes 99.975% of the total vote on all shareholder matters, as discussed in the following risk factor.

 

As a result of the number of authorized but unissued shares of our common stock and preferred stock, our Board of Directors has the ability to issue a large number of additional shares of common stock without shareholder approval, which if issued could cause substantial dilution to our then shareholders. Additionally, shares of preferred stock may be issued by our Board of Directors without shareholder approval with voting powers, and such preferences and relative, participating, optional or other special rights and powers as determined by our Board of Directors, which may be greater than the shares of common stock currently outstanding. As a result, shares of preferred stock may be issued by our Board of Directors which cause the holders to have super-majority voting power over our shares (similar to our outstanding Series B Voting Preferred Stock, discussed below), provide the holders of the preferred stock the right to convert the shares of preferred stock they hold into shares of our common stock, which may cause substantial dilution to our then common stock shareholders and/or have other rights and preferences greater than those of our common shareholders. Investors should keep in mind that the Board of Directors has the authority to issue additional shares of common stock and preferred stock, which could cause substantial dilution to our existing shareholders. Additionally, the dilutive effect of any preferred stock, which we may issue may be exacerbated given the fact that such preferred stock may have super-majority voting rights (similar to our outstanding Series B Voting Preferred Stock, discussed below) and/or other rights or preferences which could provide the preferred shareholders with voting control over us subsequent to such offering and/or give those holders the power to prevent or cause a change in control. As a result, the issuance of shares of common stock and/or preferred stock may cause the value of our securities to decrease and/or become worthless.

 

Our articles of incorporation allow for our board of directors to create a new series of preferred stock without further approval by our stockholders, which could have an anti-takeover effect and could adversely affect holders of our common stock.

 

Our authorized capital includes preferred stock issuable in one or more series. Our board has the authority to issue preferred stock and determine the price, designation, rights, preferences, privileges, restrictions and conditions, including voting and dividend rights, of those shares without any further vote or action by stockholders. The rights of the holders of common stock will be subject to, and may be adversely affected by, the rights of holders of any preferred stock that may be issued in the future. The issuance of additional preferred stock, while providing desirable flexibility in connection with possible financings and acquisitions and other corporate purposes, could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire a majority of the voting power of our outstanding voting securities, which could deprive our holders of common stock of a premium that they might otherwise realize in connection with a proposed acquisition of our company.

 

 
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Our Series B Voting Preferred Stock providers the holder(s) thereof super majority voting power over the Company.

 

As of the date of this Report, we have 1,000 shares of Series B Voting Preferred Stock issued and outstanding. The holder of the shares of the Series B Voting Preferred Stock (currently Luxor, which is wholly-owned by Anthony Brian Goodman, our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman) has the right to vote those shares of the Series B Voting Preferred Stock regarding any matter or action that is required to be submitted to the shareholders of the Company for approval. The vote of each share of the Series B Voting Preferred Stock (i.e., each 1,000 shares) is equal to and counted as 4 times the votes of all of the shares of the Company’s (i) common stock, and (ii) other voting preferred stock issued and outstanding on the date of each and every vote or consent of the shareholders of the Company regarding each and every matter submitted to the shareholders of the Company for approval—which means that each outstanding share of Series B Voting Preferred Stock currently votes a total of 93,157,092 voting shares (93,157,092,000 in aggregate). As such, the Series B Voting Preferred Stock in effect votes 99.975% of the total vote on all shareholder matters and exercises control in determining the outcome of all corporate transactions or other matters, including the election of directors, mergers, consolidations, the sale of all or substantially all of our assets, the power to prevent or cause a change in control and to determine the outcome of most matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders. The interests of Mr. Goodman may differ from the interests of the other shareholders and thus result in corporate decisions that are adverse to other shareholders. This preferred share structure severely restricts other shareholders’ ability to influence corporate matters and Mr. Goodman may take actions that some of our shareholders do not view as beneficial, each of which could reduce the market price of our securities. See also the risk factor entitled, “Our executive officer controls a majority of our voting securities and therefore he has the ability to influence matters affecting our shareholders.”, above for additional risks related to Mr. Goodman’s voting control over the Company.

 

We have not paid any cash dividends in the past and have no plans to issue cash dividends in the future, which could cause the value of our common stock to have a lower value than other similar companies which do pay cash dividends.

 

We have not paid any cash dividends on our common stock to date and do not anticipate any cash dividends being paid to holders of our common stock in the foreseeable future. While our dividend policy will be based on the operating results and capital needs of the business, it is anticipated that any earnings will be retained to finance our future expansion. As we have no plans to issue cash dividends in the future, our common stock could be less desirable to other investors and as a result, the value of our common stock may decline, or fail to reach the valuations of other similarly situated companies who have historically paid cash dividends in the past.

 

There is no guarantee that our application to list our common stock on NASDAQ will be approved, and if our common stock is listed on NASDAQ, there can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with NASDAQ’s continued listing standards.

 

We have applied to list our common stock on The NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “GMGI”. There can be no assurance that The NASDAQ Capital Market will approve our application for the listing of our common stock. The approval process for the listing of our shares on The NASDAQ Capital Market, or any other exchange, involves factors beyond our control.

 

If our common stock is approved for listing on The NASDAQ Capital Market, there is no guarantee that we will be able to maintain such listing for any period of time by perpetually satisfying NASDAQ’s continued listing requirements. Our failure to continue to meet these requirements may result in our securities being delisted from NASDAQ.

 

The absence of such a listing may adversely affect the acceptance of our common stock as currency or the value accorded by other parties. Further, if we are delisted, we would also incur additional costs under state blue sky laws in connection with any sales of our securities. These requirements could severely limit the market liquidity of our common stock and the ability of our shareholders to sell our common stock in the secondary market. If our common stock is delisted by NASDAQ, our common stock may be eligible to trade on an over-the-counter quotation system, such as the OTCQB Market or OTC Pink Market, where an investor may find it more difficult to sell our securities or obtain accurate quotations as to the market value of our securities. In the event our common stock is delisted from The NASDAQ Capital Market in the future, we may not be able to list our common stock on another national securities exchange or obtain quotation on an over-the counter quotation system.

 

 
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Our common stock has previously been a “penny stock” under SEC rules, and may be subject to the “penny stock” rules in the future. It may be more difficult to resell securities classified as “penny stock.

 

In the past our common stock was a “penny stock” under applicable SEC rules (generally defined as non-exchange traded stock with a per-share price below $5.00). While our common stock is not considered a “penny stock” while we maintain a stock price above $5.00 and will not be a “penny stock” if we obtain a listing of our common stock on The NASDAQ Capital Market, our common stock may become a “penny stock” in the future. “Penny stock” rules impose additional sales practice requirements on broker-dealers that recommend the purchase or sale of penny stocks to persons other than those who qualify as “established customers” or “accredited investors.” For example, broker-dealers must determine the appropriateness for non-qualifying persons of investments in penny stocks. Broker-dealers must also provide, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, disclose the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, furnish monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer’s account, provide a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser, and receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction.

 

Legal remedies available to an investor in “penny stocks” may include the following:

 

 

If a “penny stock” is sold to the investor in violation of the requirements listed above, or other federal or states securities laws, the investor may be able to cancel the purchase and receive a refund of the investment.

 

 

 

 

If a “penny stock” is sold to the investor in a fraudulent manner, the investor may be able to sue the persons and firms that committed the fraud for damages.

 

These requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity, if any, in the secondary market for a security that becomes subject to the penny stock rules. The additional burdens imposed upon broker-dealers by such requirements may discourage broker-dealers from effecting transactions in our securities, which could severely limit the market price and liquidity of our securities. These requirements may restrict the ability of broker-dealers to sell our common stock and may affect your ability to resell our common stock.

 

Many brokerage firms will discourage or refrain from recommending investments in penny stocks. Most institutional investors will not invest in penny stocks. In addition, many individual investors will not invest in penny stocks due, among other reasons, to the increased financial risk generally associated with these investments.

 

For these reasons, penny stocks may have a limited market and, consequently, limited liquidity.

 

There may not be sufficient liquidity in the market for our securities in order for investors to sell their shares. The market price of our comment stock has been, and may continue to be, volatile.

 

The market price of our common stock has been, and is likely to continue to be, highly volatile, as is the stock market in general. Some of the factors that may materially affect the market price of our common stock are beyond our control, such as conditions or trends in the industry in which we operate or sales of our common stock. This situation is attributable to a number of factors, including the fact that we are a small company which is relatively unknown to stock analysts, stock brokers, institutional investors and others in the investment community that generate or influence sales volume, and that even if we came to the attention of such persons, they tend to be risk‑averse and would be reluctant to follow an unproven company such as ours or purchase or recommend the purchase of our shares until such time as we became more seasoned and viable.

 

 
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As a consequence, there have been, and may be, periods of several days or more when trading activity in our shares is minimal or non‑existent, as compared to a mature issuer which has a large and steady volume of trading activity that will generally support continuous sales without an adverse effect on share price. It is possible that a broader or more active public trading market for our common stock will not develop or be sustained, or that trading levels will not continue. These factors have, and may in the future, materially adversely affect the market price of our common stock, regardless of our performance. In addition, the public stock markets have experienced extreme price and trading volume volatility. This volatility has significantly affected the market prices of securities of many companies for reasons frequently unrelated to the operating performance of the specific companies. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

There is a limited public market for our securities and you could lose all or part of your investment.

 

Our securities are currently quoted on the OTC Pink Market maintained by OTC Markets. We currently have a volatile, sporadic and illiquid market for our common stock, which is subject to wide fluctuations in response to several factors. The trading price of our common stock is likely to continue to be volatile. This volatility may prevent you from being able to sell your securities at or above the price you paid for your securities. Our stock price could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to a variety of factors, which include:

 

 

actual or anticipated variations in our results of operations;

 

 

 

 

our ability or inability to generate revenues;

 

 

 

 

the number of shares in our public float;

 

 

 

 

increased competition; and

 

 

 

 

conditions and trends in the market for our services and products.

 

Our stock price may be impacted by factors that are unrelated or disproportionate to our operating performance. These market fluctuations, as well as general economic, political and market conditions, such as recessions, interest rates or international currency fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Shareholders and potential investors in our common stock should exercise caution before making an investment in us, and should not rely solely on the publicly quoted or traded stock prices in determining our common stock, but should instead determine the value of our common stock based on the information contained in our public disclosures, industry information, and those business valuation methods commonly used to value private companies.

 

Additionally, the market price of our common stock historically has fluctuated significantly based on, but not limited to, such factors as general stock market trends, announcements of developments related to our business, actual or anticipated variations in our operating results, our ability or inability to generate revenues, and conditions and trends in the industries in which our customers are engaged.

 

In recent years, the stock market in general has experienced extreme price fluctuations that have oftentimes been unrelated to the operating performance of the affected companies. Similarly, the market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly based upon factors unrelated or disproportionate to our operating performance. These market fluctuations, as well as general economic, political and market conditions, such as recessions, interest rates or international currency fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

 
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Our Bylaws provide for indemnification of officers and directors at our expense, which may result in a major cost to us and hurt the interests of our shareholders because corporate resources may be expended for the benefit of officers or directors.

 

Our Bylaws provide that we shall indemnify our directors and officers to the fullest extent not prohibited by the Nevada Revised Statutes; and, provided, further, that we are not required to indemnify any director or officer in connection with any proceeding (or part thereof) initiated by such person unless (i) such indemnification is expressly required to be made by law, (ii) the proceeding was authorized by the Board of Directors, (iii) such indemnification is provided by the Company, in its sole discretion, pursuant to the powers vested in the Company under the Nevada Revised Statutes or (iv) such indemnification is required to be made pursuant to the terms of the Bylaws. We also have power to indemnify our employees and other agents as set forth in the Nevada Revised Statutes. Our Bylaws also provide that we are required to advance to any person who was or is a party or is threatened to be made a party to any threatened, pending or completed action, suit or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative or investigative, by reason of the fact that he is or was a director or officer, of the corporation, or is or was serving at the request of the Company as a director or executive officer of another corporation, partnership, joint venture, trust or other enterprise, prior to the final disposition of the proceeding, promptly following request therefor, all expenses incurred by any director or officer in connection with such proceeding upon receipt of an undertaking by or on behalf of such person to repay said amounts if it should be determined ultimately that such person is not entitled to be indemnified under the Bylaws or otherwise.

 

We have been advised that, in the opinion of the SEC, indemnification for liabilities arising under federal securities laws is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification for liabilities arising under federal securities laws, other than the payment by us of expenses incurred or paid by a director, officer or controlling person in the successful defense of any action, suit or proceeding, is asserted by a director, officer or controlling person in connection with our activities, we will (unless in the opinion of our counsel, the matter has been settled by controlling precedent) submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction, the question whether indemnification by us is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue. The legal process relating to this matter if it were to occur is likely to be very costly and may result in us receiving negative publicity, either of which factors is likely to materially reduce the market and price for our shares, if such a market ever develops.

 

Our common stock may continue to be followed by only a limited number of analysts and there may continue to be a limited number of institutions acting as market makers for our common stock.

 

For the foreseeable future, our common stock is unlikely to be followed by a significant number of market analysts, and there may be few institutions acting as market makers for our common stock. Either of these factors could adversely affect the liquidity and trading price of our common stock. Until our common stock is fully distributed and an orderly market develops in our common stock, if ever, the price at which it trades is likely to fluctuate significantly. Prices for our common stock are determined in the marketplace and may be influenced by many factors, including the depth and liquidity of the market for shares of our common stock, developments affecting our business, including the impact of the factors referred to elsewhere in these Risk Factors, investor perception of us and general economic and market conditions. No assurances can be given that an orderly or liquid market will ever develop for the shares of our common stock.

 

Because of the anticipated low price of the securities being registered, many brokerage firms may not be willing to effect transactions in these securities. Purchasers of our securities should be aware that any market that develops in our stock will be subject to the penny stock restrictions.

 

In the event our common stock is approved for listing on The NASDAQ Capital Market, we will need to meet certain continued listing requirements in order to not have our common stock delisted from such markets.

 

 
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We have applied to list our common stock on The NASDAQ Capital Market; however, such application may not be granted. In the event such application is granted, in order to maintain our listing, we will need to continue to meet the continued listing standards of The NASDAQ Capital Market. Among the conditions required for continued listing on the Nasdaq Capital Market, Nasdaq generally requires listed companies to maintain at least $2.5 million in shareholders’ equity or $500,000 in net income over the prior two years or two of the prior three years, to have a majority of independent directors, have an audit committee of at least three members, and to maintain a stock price over $1.00 per share, among other requirements. If we fail to timely comply with the applicable requirements of The NASDAQ Capital Market assuming our common stock is approved for listing on The NASDAQ Capital Market, depending on where we choose to list our common stock, and assuming our common stock is approved for listing on such market, our stock may be delisted. In addition, even if we demonstrate compliance with the requirements above, we will have to continue to meet other objective and subjective listing requirements to continue to be listed on the applicable market. Delisting from the NASDAQ Capital Market could make trading our common stock more difficult for investors, potentially leading to declines in our share price and liquidity. Without a NASDAQ Capital Market, shareholders may have a difficult time getting a quote for the sale or purchase of our stock, the sale or purchase of our stock would likely be made more difficult and the trading volume and liquidity of our stock could decline. Delisting from The NASDAQ Capital Market could also result in negative publicity and could also make it more difficult for us to raise additional capital. The absence of such a listing may adversely affect the acceptance of our common stock as currency or the value accorded by other parties. Further, if we are delisted, we would also incur additional costs under state blue sky laws in connection with any sales of our securities. These requirements could severely limit the market liquidity of our common stock and the ability of our shareholders to sell our common stock in the secondary market. If our common stock is listed, and then delisted by NASDAQ, our common stock may be eligible to trade on an over-the-counter quotation system, such as the OTCQB market, where an investor may find it more difficult to sell our stock or obtain accurate quotations as to the market value of our common stock. In the event our common stock is listed, and then delisted from The NASDAQ Capital Market, we may not be able to list our common stock on another national securities exchange or obtain quotation on an over-the counter quotation system.

 

Our internal control over financial reporting does not currently meet the standards required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and failure to achieve and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.

 

We have not maintained internal control over financial reporting in a manner that meets the standards of publicly-traded companies required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The rules governing the standards that must be met for our management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. We expect to begin the process of reviewing, documenting, and testing our internal control over financial reporting during the current fiscal year. We might encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any changes necessary to make a favorable assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. If we cannot favorably assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, investors could lose confidence in our financial information and the price of our common stock could decline.

 

Efforts to comply with the applicable provisions of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act will involve significant expenditures, and non-compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act may adversely affect us and the market price of our common stock.

 

Under current SEC rules, we have been required to report on our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404, and related rules and regulations of the SEC. We will be required to review on an annual basis our internal control over financial reporting, and on a quarterly and annual basis to evaluate and disclose changes in our internal control over financial reporting. This process may result in a diversion of management’s time and attention and may involve significant expenditures. We have not maintained internal control over financial reporting in a manner that meets the standards of publicly traded companies required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The rules governing the standards that must be met for our evaluation by management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. We expect to begin the process of reviewing, documenting, and testing our internal control over financial reporting in the next financial year. We might encounter problems or delays in completing the implementation of any changes necessary to make a favorable assessment of our internal control over financial reporting. If we cannot favorably assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, investors could lose confidence in our financial information and the price of our common stock could decline.

 

 
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Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Nevada law could discourage, delay, or prevent a change in control of our company and may affect the trading price of our common stock and warrants.

 

We are a Nevada corporation, and the anti-takeover provisions of the Nevada Revised Statutes may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control by prohibiting us from engaging in a business combination with an interested stockholder for a period of three years after the person becomes an interested stockholder, even if a change in control would be beneficial to our existing stockholders. In addition, our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may discourage, delay, or prevent a change in our management or control over us that stockholders may consider favorable. Our certificate of incorporation and bylaws:

 

authorize the issuance of “blank check” preferred stock that could be issued by our board of directors to thwart a takeover attempt;

 

provide that vacancies on our board of directors, including newly created directorships, may be filled by a majority vote of directors then in office;

 

place restrictive requirements (including advance notification of stockholder nominations and proposals) on how special meetings of stockholders may be called by our stockholders; do not provide stockholders with the ability to cumulate their votes; and

 

provide that our board of directors have sole power to amend our bylaws.

 

Risks Related to International Operations

 

The risks related to international operations, in particular in countries outside of the United States and Canada, could negatively affect the Company’s results.

 

It is expected that moving forward, the Company will derive more than 10% of its revenue from transactions denominated in currencies other than the United States and the Canadian dollar, and the Company expects that receivables with respect to foreign sales will continue to account for a significant majority of its total accounts and receivables outstanding. As such, the Company’s operations may be adversely affected by changes in foreign government policies and legislation or social instability and other factors which are not within the control of the Company, including, but not limited to, recessions in foreign economies, expropriation, nationalization and limitation or restriction on repatriation of funds, assets or earnings, longer receivables collection periods and greater difficulty in collecting accounts receivable, changes in consumer tastes and trends, renegotiation or nullification of existing contracts or licenses, changes in gaming policies, regulatory requirements or the personnel administering them, currency fluctuations and devaluations, exchange controls, economic sanctions and royalty and tax increases, risk of terrorist activities, revolution, border disputes, implementation of tariffs and other trade barriers and protectionist practices, taxation policies, including royalty and tax increases and retroactive tax claims, volatility of financial markets and fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, difficulties in the protection of intellectual property particularly in countries with fewer intellectual property protections, the effects that evolving regulations regarding data privacy may have on the Company’s online operations, adverse changes in the creditworthiness of parties with whom the Company has significant receivables or forward currency exchange contracts, labor disputes and other risks arising out of foreign governmental sovereignty over the areas in which the Company’s operations are conducted. The Company’s operations may also be adversely affected by social, political and economic instability, and by laws and policies of such foreign jurisdictions affecting foreign trade, taxation and investment. If the Company’s operations are disrupted and/or the economic integrity of its contracts is threatened for unexpected reasons, its business may be harmed.

 

 
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The Company’s international activities may require protracted negotiations with host governments, national companies and third parties. Foreign government regulations may favor or require the awarding of contracts to local contractors or require foreign contractors to employ citizens of, or purchase supplies from, a particular jurisdiction. In the event of a dispute arising in connection with the Company’s operations in a foreign jurisdiction where it conducts its business, the Company may be subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of foreign courts or may not be successful in subjecting foreign persons to the jurisdictions of the courts of United States or Canada or enforcing American and Canadian judgments in such other jurisdictions. The Company may also be hindered or prevented from enforcing its rights with respect to a governmental instrumentality because of the doctrine of sovereign immunity. Accordingly, the Company’s activities in foreign jurisdictions could be substantially affected by factors beyond the Company’s control, any of which could have a material adverse effect on it. The Company believes that management’s experience to date in commercializing its products and solutions in Asia Pacific may be of assistance in helping to reduce these risks. Some countries in which the Company may operate may be considered politically and economically unstable.

 

Doing business in the industries in which the Company operates often requires compliance with numerous and extensive procedures and formalities. These procedures and formalities may result in unexpected or lengthy delays in commencing important business activities. In some cases, failure to follow such formalities or obtain relevant evidence may call into question the validity of the entity or the actions taken. Management of the Company is unable to predict the effect of additional corporate and regulatory formalities which may be adopted in the future including whether any such laws or regulations would materially increase the Company's cost of doing business or affect its operations in any area.

 

We may in the future enter into agreements and conduct activities outside of the jurisdictions where we currently carry on business, which expansion may present challenges and risks that we have not faced in the past, any of which could adversely affect our results of operations and/or financial condition.

 

The Company is subject to foreign exchange and currency risks that could adversely affect its operations, and the Company’s ability to mitigate its foreign exchange risk through hedging transactions may be limited.

 

It is expected that moving froward, the Company will derive more than 10% of its revenue from transactions denominated in currencies other than the United States and the Canadian dollar; however, a substantial portion of the Company’s operating expenses are incurred in United States dollars. Fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar, the Euro and other currencies may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results. Our consolidated financial results are affected by foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations. Foreign currency exchange rate exposures arise from current transactions and anticipated transactions denominated in currencies other than United States and Canadian dollars and from the translation of foreign-currency-denominated balance sheet accounts into United States and Canadian dollar-denominated balance sheet accounts. We are exposed to currency exchange rate fluctuations because portions of our revenue and expenses are denominated in currencies other than the United States and Canadian dollar, particularly the Euro. In particular, uncertainty regarding economic conditions in Europe and the debt crisis affecting certain countries in the European Union pose risk to the stability of the Euro. Exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect our operating results and cash flows and the value of our assets outside of United States and Canada. If a foreign currency is devalued in a jurisdiction in which we are paid in such currency, then our customers may be required to pay higher amounts for our products, which they may be unable or unwilling to pay.

 

While we may enter into forward currency swaps and other derivative instruments intended to mitigate the foreign currency exchange risk, there can be no assurance we will do so or that any instruments that we enter into will successfully mitigate such risk. If we enter into foreign currency forward or other hedging contracts, we would be subject to the risk that a counterparty to one or more of these contracts may default on its performance under the contracts. During an economic downturn, a counterparty’s financial condition may deteriorate rapidly and with little notice, and we may be unable to take action to protect our exposure. In the event of a counterparty default, we could lose the benefit of its hedging contract, which may harm our business and financial condition. In the event that one or more of our counterparties becomes insolvent or files for bankruptcy, our ability to eventually recover any benefit lost as a result of that counterparty’s default may be limited by the liquidity of the counterparty. We expect that we will not be able to hedge all of our exposure to any particular foreign currency, and we may not hedge our exposure at all with respect to certain foreign currencies. Changes in exchange rates and our limited ability or inability to successfully hedge exchange rate risk could have an adverse impact on our liquidity and results of operations.

 

 
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The gaming industry is highly regulated, and we must adhere to various regulations and maintain applicable licenses to continue our operations. Failure to abide by regulations or maintain applicable licenses could be disruptive to our business and could adversely affect our operations.

 

We and our products are subject to extensive regulation under federal, state, local and foreign laws, rules and regulations of the jurisdictions in which we do business and our products are used. We currently block direct access to wagering on our website from the United States and other jurisdictions in which we do not have a license to operate through IP address filtering. Individuals are required to enter their age upon gaining access to our platform and any misrepresentation of such users age will result in the forfeiting of his or her deposit and any withdrawals from such users account requires proof of government issued identification. In addition, our payment service providers use their own identify and ISP verification software. Despite all such measures, it is conceivable that a user, under age, or otherwise could devise a way to evade our blocking measures and access our website from the United States or any other foreign jurisdiction in which we are not currently permitted to operate.

 

Violations of laws in one jurisdiction could result in disciplinary action in other jurisdictions. Licenses, approvals or findings of suitability may be revoked, suspended or conditioned. In sum, we may not be able to obtain or maintain all necessary registrations, licenses, permits or approvals. The licensing process may result in delays or adversely affect our operations and our ability to maintain key personnel, and our efforts to comply with any new licensing regulations will increase our costs.

 

We may be unable to obtain licenses in new jurisdictions where our customers operate.

 

We are subject to regulation in any jurisdiction where our customers access our website. To expand into any such jurisdiction, we may need to be licensed, or obtain approvals of our products or services. If we do not receive or receive a revocation of a license in a particular jurisdiction for our products, we would not be able to sell or place our products in that jurisdiction. Any such outcome could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and any growth plans for our business.

 

Privacy concerns could result in regulatory changes and impose additional costs and liabilities on the Company, limit its use of information, and adversely affect its business.

 

Personal privacy has become a significant issue in Canada, the United States, Europe, and many other countries in which we currently operate and may operate in the future. Many federal, state, and foreign legislatures and government agencies have imposed or are considering imposing restrictions and requirements about the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information obtained from individuals. Changes to laws or regulations affecting privacy could impose additional costs and liability on us and could limit our use of such information to add value for customers. If we were required to change our business activities or revise or eliminate services, or to implement burdensome compliance measures, our business and results of operations could be harmed. In addition, we may be subject to fines, penalties, and potential litigation if we fail to comply with applicable privacy regulations, any of which could adversely affect our business, liquidity, and results of operation.

 

The Company’s results of operations could be affected by natural events in the locations in which we operate or where our customers or suppliers operate.

 

We, our customers, and our suppliers have operations in locations subject to natural occurrences such as severe weather and other geological events, including hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods that could disrupt operations. Any serious disruption at any of our facilities or the facilities of our customers or suppliers due to a natural disaster could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and increase our costs and expenses. If there is a natural disaster or other serious disruption at any of our facilities, it could impair our ability to adequately supply our customers, cause a significant disruption to our operations, cause us to incur significant costs to relocate or re-establish these functions and negatively impact our operating results. While we intend to seek insurance against certain business interruption risks, such insurance may not adequately compensate us for any losses incurred as a result of natural or other disasters. In addition, any natural disaster that results in a prolonged disruption to the operations of our customers or suppliers may adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition.

 

 
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Risks Related to Intellectual Property and Technology

 

Our intellectual property may be insufficient to properly safeguard our technology and brands.

 

We may apply for patent protection in the United States, Canada, Europe, and other countries relating to certain existing and proposed processes, designs and methods and other product innovations. Patent applications can, however, take many years to issue and we can provide no assurance that any of these patents will be issued at all. If we are denied any or all of these patents, we may not be able to successfully prevent our competitors from imitating our solutions or using some or all of the processes that are the subject of such patent applications. Such imitation may lead to increased competition within the finite market for our solutions. Even if pending patents are issued to us, our intellectual property rights may not be sufficiently comprehensive to prevent our competitors from developing similar competitive products and technologies. Our success may also depend on our ability to obtain trademark protection for the names or symbols under which we market our products and to obtain copyright protection and patent protection of our proprietary technologies, intellectual property, and other game innovations and if the granted patents are challenged, protection may be lost. We may not be able to build and maintain goodwill in our trademarks or obtain trademark or patent protection, and there can be no assurance that any trademark, copyright or issued patent will provide competitive advantages for us or that our intellectual property will not be successfully challenged or circumvented by competitors.

 

We will also rely on trade secrets, ideas, and proprietary know-how. Although we generally require our employees and independent contractors to enter into confidentiality and intellectual property assignment agreements, we cannot be assured that the obligations therein will be maintained and honored. If these agreements are breached, it is unlikely that the remedies available to us will be sufficient to compensate us for the damages suffered. In spite of confidentiality agreements and other methods of protecting trade secrets, our proprietary information could become known to or independently developed by competitors. If we fail to adequately protect our intellectual property and confidential information, our business may be harmed, and our liquidity and results of operations may be materially adversely impacted.

 

We may be subject to claims of intellectual property infringement or invalidity and adverse outcomes of litigation could unfavorably affect our operating results.

 

Monitoring infringement and misappropriation of intellectual property can be difficult and expensive, and we may not be able to detect infringement or misappropriation of our proprietary rights. Although we intend to aggressively pursue anyone who is reasonably believed to be infringing upon our intellectual property rights and who poses a significant commercial risk to the business, to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights, initiating and maintaining suits against such third parties will require substantial financial resources. We may not have the financial resources to bring such suits, and, if we do bring such suits, we may not prevail. Regardless of our success in any such actions, the expenses and management distraction involved may have a material adverse effect on our financial position.

 

A significant portion of our revenues may be generated from products using certain intellectual property rights, and our operating results would be negatively impacted if we were unsuccessful in licensing certain of those rights and/or protecting those rights from infringement, including losses of proprietary information from breaches of our cyber security efforts.

 

Further, our competitors have been granted patents protecting various gaming products and solutions features, including systems, methods, and designs. If our products and solutions employ these processes, or other subject matter that is claimed under our competitors’ patents, or if other companies obtain patents claiming subject matter that we use, those companies may bring infringement actions against us. The question of whether a product infringes a patent involves complex legal and factual issues, the determination of which is often uncertain. In addition, because patent applications can take many years to issue, there may be applications now pending of which we are unaware, which might later result in issued patents that our products and solutions may infringe. There can be no assurance that our products, including those with currently pending patent applications, will not be determined to have infringed upon an existing third-party patent. If any of our products and solutions infringes a valid patent, we may be required to discontinue offering certain products or systems, pay damages, purchase a license to use the intellectual property in question from its owner, or redesign the product in question to avoid infringement. A license may not be available or may require us to pay substantial royalties, which could in turn force us to attempt to redesign the infringing product or to develop alternative technologies at a considerable expense. Additionally, we may not be successful in any attempt to redesign the infringing product or to develop alternative technologies, which could force us to withdraw our product or services from the market.

 

 
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We may also infringe other intellectual property rights belonging to third parties, such as trademarks, copyrights, and confidential information. As with patent litigation, the infringement of trademarks, copyrights and confidential information involve complex legal and factual issues and our products, branding or associated marketing materials may be found to have infringed existing third-party rights. When any third-party infringement occurs, we may be required to stop using the infringing intellectual property rights, pay damages and, if we wish to keep using the third-party intellectual property, purchase a license or otherwise redesign the product, branding or associated marketing materials to avoid further infringement. Such a license may not be available or may require us to pay substantial royalties.

 

It is also possible that the validity of any of our intellectual property rights might be challenged either in standalone proceedings or as part of infringement claims in the future. There can be no assurance that our intellectual property rights will withstand an invalidity claim and, if declared invalid, the protection afforded to the product, branding or marketing material will be lost.

 

Moreover, the future interpretation of intellectual property law regarding the validity of intellectual property by governmental agencies or courts in the United States, Canada, Europe, or other jurisdictions in which we have rights could negatively affect the validity or enforceability of our current or future intellectual property. This could have multiple negative impacts including, without limitation, the marketability of, or anticipated revenue from, certain of our products. Additionally, due to the differences in foreign patent, trademark, copyright, and other laws concerning proprietary rights, our intellectual property may not receive the same degree of protection in foreign countries as it would in the United States, Canada, or Europe. Our failure to possess, obtain or maintain adequate protection of our intellectual property rights for any reason in these jurisdictions could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Furthermore, infringement and other intellectual property claims, with or without merit, can be expensive and time-consuming to litigate, and we may not have the financial and human resources to defend ourself against any infringement suits that may be brought against us. Litigation can also distract management from day-to-day operations of the business.

 

In addition, our business is dependent in part on the intellectual property of third parties. Our success may depend upon our ability to obtain licenses to use new and existing intellectual property and our ability to retain or expand existing licenses for certain products. If we are unable to obtain new licenses or renew or expand existing licenses, we may be required to discontinue or limit its use of such products that use the licensed marks and our financial condition, operating results or prospects may be harmed.

 

There is a risk that the Company’s network systems will be unable to meet the growing demand for its online products.

 

The growth of internet usage has caused frequent interruptions and delays in processing and transmitting data over the internet. There can be no assurance that the internet infrastructure or our own network systems will be able to meet the demand placed on it by the continued growth of the internet, the overall online gaming and interactive entertainment industry and our customers.

 

The internet’s viability as a medium for products and services offered by us could be affected if the necessary infrastructure is not sufficient, or if other technologies and technological devices eclipse the internet as a viable channel.

 

 
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End-users of our products and services will depend on internet service providers and our system infrastructure (or those of our licensed partners) for access to us or our licensees’ products and services. Many of these services have experienced service outages in the past and could experience service outages, delays, and other difficulties due to system failures, stability, or interruption.

 

Malfunctions of third-party communications infrastructure, hardware and software expose us to a variety of risks we cannot control.

 

Our business will depend upon the capacity, reliability and security of the infrastructure owned by third parties over which our offerings would be deployed. We have no control over the operation, quality, or maintenance of a significant portion of that infrastructure or whether or not those third parties will upgrade or improve their equipment. We depend on these companies to maintain the operational integrity of our connections. If one or more of these companies is unable or unwilling to supply or expand our levels of service in the future, our operations could be adversely impacted. Also, to the extent the number of users of networks utilizing our future products and services suddenly increases, the technology platform and secure hosting services which will be required to accommodate a higher volume of traffic may result in slower response times or service interruptions. System interruptions or increases in response time could result in a loss of potential or existing users and, if sustained or repeated, could reduce the appeal of the networks to users. In addition, users depend on real-time communications; outages caused by increased traffic could result in delays and system failures. These types of occurrences could cause users to perceive that our products and services do not function properly and could therefore adversely affect our ability to attract and retain licensees, strategic partners, and customers.

 

General Risk Factors

 

If we make any acquisitions, they may disrupt or have a negative impact on our business.

 

If we make acquisitions in the future, funding permitting, which may not be available on favorable terms, if at all, we could have difficulty integrating the acquired company’s assets, personnel and operations with our own. We do not anticipate that any acquisitions or mergers we may enter into in the future would result in a change of control of the Company. In addition, the key personnel of the acquired business may not be willing to work for us. We cannot predict the effect expansion may have on our core business. Regardless of whether we are successful in making an acquisition, the negotiations could disrupt our ongoing business, distract our management and employees and increase our expenses. In addition to the risks described above, acquisitions are accompanied by a number of inherent risks, including, without limitation, the following:

 

 

the difficulty of integrating acquired products, services or operations;

 

the potential disruption of the ongoing businesses and distraction of our management and the management of acquired companies;

 

difficulties in maintaining uniform standards, controls, procedures and policies;

 

the potential impairment of relationships with employees and customers as a result of any integration of new management personnel;

 

the potential inability or failure to achieve additional sales and enhance our customer base through cross-marketing of the products to new and existing customers;

 

the effect of any government regulations which relate to the business acquired;

 

potential unknown liabilities associated with acquired businesses or product lines, or the need to spend significant amounts to retool, reposition or modify the marketing and sales of acquired products or operations, or the defense of any litigation, whether or not successful, resulting from actions of the acquired company prior to our acquisition; and

 

potential expenses under the labor, environmental and other laws of various jurisdictions.

 

Our business could be severely impaired if and to the extent that we are unable to succeed in addressing any of these risks or other problems encountered in connection with an acquisition, many of which cannot be presently identified. These risks and problems could disrupt our ongoing business, distract our management and employees, increase our expenses and adversely affect our results of operations.

 

 
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Our insurance may not provide adequate levels of coverage against claims.

 

We maintain insurance that we believe is customary for businesses of our size and type. However, there are types of losses we may incur that cannot be insured against or that we believe are not economically reasonable to insure. Moreover, any loss incurred could exceed policy limits and policy payments made to us may not be made on a timely basis. Such losses could adversely affect our business prospects, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

Our management team has limited experience managing a public company and regulatory compliance may divert our attention from the day-to-day management of our business.

 

Our management team has limited experience managing a publicly-traded company and limited experience complying with the increasingly complex laws pertaining to public companies. These obligations typically require substantial attention from our senior management and could divert our attention away from the day-to-day management of our business.

 

Litigation costs and the outcome of litigation could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.

 

From time to time, the Company may be subject to litigation claims through the ordinary course of our business operations regarding, but not limited to, employment matters, security of consumer and employee personal information, contractual relations with suppliers, marketing and infringement of trademarks and other intellectual property rights. Litigation to defend the Company against claims by third parties, or to enforce any rights that the Company may have against third parties, may be necessary, which could result in substantial costs and diversion of the Company’s resources, causing a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations. The Company is not aware of any current material legal proceedings outstanding, threatened or pending as of the date hereof by or against the Company, given the nature of its business, it is, and may from time to time in the future be, party to various, and at times numerous, legal, administrative and regulatory inquiries, investigations, proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. Because the outcome of litigation is inherently uncertain, if one or more of such legal matters were to be resolved against the Company for amounts in excess of management’s expectations, the Company’s results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

 

Shareholders may be diluted significantly through our efforts to obtain financing and satisfy obligations through the issuance of additional shares of our common stock.

 

Wherever possible, our Board of Directors will attempt to use non-cash consideration to satisfy obligations. In many instances, we believe that the non-cash consideration will consist of restricted shares of our common stock or where shares are to be issued to our officers, directors, and applicable consultants. Our Board of Directors has authority, without action or vote of the shareholders, to issue all or part of the authorized but unissued shares of common stock. In addition, we may attempt to raise capital by selling shares of our common stock, possibly at a discount to market. We also currently plan to sell equity pursuant to a registration statement in connection with the planned uplisting of our common stock to The NASDAQ Capital Market. These actions will result in dilution of the ownership interests of existing shareholders, which may further dilute common stock book value, and that dilution may be material. Such issuances may also serve to enhance existing management’s ability to maintain control of the Company because the shares may be issued to parties or entities committed to supporting existing management.

 

Our ability to grow and compete in the future will be adversely affected if adequate capital is not available.

 

The ability of our business to grow and compete depends on the availability of adequate capital, which in turn depends in large part on our cash flow from operations and the availability of equity and debt financing. Our cash flow from operations may not be sufficient or we may not be able to obtain equity or debt financing on acceptable terms or at all to implement our growth strategy. As a result, adequate capital may not be available to finance our current growth plans, take advantage of business opportunities or respond to competitive pressures, any of which could harm our business.

 

 
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If we are unable to manage future growth effectively, our profitability and liquidity could be adversely affected.

 

Our ability to achieve our desired growth depends on our execution in functional areas such as management, sales and marketing, finance and general administration and operations. To manage any future growth, we must continue to improve our operational and financial processes and systems and expand, train and manage our employee base and control associated costs. Our efforts to grow our business, both in terms of size and in diversity of customer bases served, will require rapid expansion in certain functional areas and put a significant strain on our resources. We may incur significant expenses as we attempt to scale our resources and make investments in our business that we believe are necessary to achieve long-term growth goals. If we are unable to manage our growth effectively, our expenses could increase without a proportionate increase in revenue, our margins could decrease, and our business and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

We incur significant costs to ensure compliance with U.S. reporting and corporate governance requirements.

 

We incur significant costs associated with our public company reporting requirements and with applicable U.S. corporate governance requirements and will incur substantial costs associated with our planned NASDAQ Capital Market listing (assuming our common stock is approved for listing on The NASDAQ Capital Market), including requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and other rules implemented by the SEC and The NASDAQ Capital Market (if applicable). These rules and regulations significantly increase our legal and financial compliance costs and make some activities more time consuming and costly. These applicable rules and regulations also make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance. We may also be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. As a result, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified individuals to serve on our Board of Directors or as executive officers.

 

For all of the foregoing reasons and others set forth herein, an investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 

 

None.

 

Item 2. Properties  

 

The Company has a back office agreement with Articulate, to utilize its premises in Sydney, Australia, on a month-to-month basis with a current rate of $11,000 per month. Pursuant to the agreement, the Company subleases approximately 700 square feet of office space.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

  

In the ordinary course of business, we may become a party to lawsuits involving various matters. The impact and outcome of litigation, if any, is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm our business. We believe the ultimate resolution of any such current proceeding will not have a material adverse effect on our continued financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 

   

Not applicable

  

 
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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is presently quoted on the OTC Pink Market, operated by OTC Markets Group Inc., under the symbol “GMGI”. At present, there is a very limited market for our common stock. The OTC Market is a network of security dealers who buy and sell stock. The dealers are connected by a computer network that provides information on current “bids” and “asks”, as well as volume information.

 

We have applied to list our common stock on The NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “GMGI”. No assurance can be given that our application will be accepted.

 

The following table sets forth the range of high and low sales prices for our common stock for each of the periods indicated as reported by the OTC Pink Market. These quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

12 Month Period Ended January 31, 2021

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter ended April 30, 2020

 

$ 1.92

 

 

$ 0.19

 

Quarter ended July 31, 2020

 

 

4.00

 

 

 

0.97

 

Quarter ended October 31, 2020

 

 

7.55

 

 

 

3.00

 

Quarter ended January 31, 2021

 

 

7.75

 

 

 

4.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6 Month Period Ended January 31, 2020

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter ended October 31, 2019

 

 

1.10

 

 

 

0.54

 

Quarter ended January 31, 2020

 

 

0.90

 

 

 

0.52

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 Month Period Ended July 31, 2019

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter ended October 31, 2018

 

$ 0.18

 

 

$ 0.09

 

Quarter ended January 31, 2019

 

 

0.21

 

 

 

0.12

 

Quarter ended April 31, 2019

 

 

0.59

 

 

 

0.16

 

Quarter ended July 31, 2019

 

 

1.01

 

 

 

0.33

 

 

Holders

 

According to the records of our transfer agent, as of April 30, 2021, there were approximately 92 record holders of our common stock. The number of record holders does not include beneficial owners of common stock whose shares are held in the names of banks, brokers, nominees, or other fiduciaries.

  

Dividends

 

We have never paid any cash dividends on our common stock. We currently anticipate that we will retain all future earnings for use in our business. Consequently, we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends in the future will depend upon our results of operations, as well as our short‑term and long‑term cash availability, working capital, working capital needs, and other factors as determined by our Board of Directors. Currently, except as may be provided by applicable laws, there are no contractual or other restrictions on our ability to pay dividends if we were to decide to declare and pay them.

 

 
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Recent sales of unregistered securities 

 

There have been no sales of unregistered securities during the quarter ended January 31, 2021 and from the period from February 1, 2021 to the filing date of this Report, which have not previously been disclosed in a Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q or in a Current Report on Form 8-K, except as follows:

 

Recent sales of unregistered securities during the quarter ended January 31, 2021

 

The following is a summary of transactions during the three months ended January 31, 2021 involving sales of our securities that were not registered under the Securities Act: 

 

On November 4, 2020, a consultant exercised options to purchase 133,334 shares of common stock for cash, pursuant to which the $8,000 aggregate exercise price of the options was paid to the Company and 133,334 shares were issued.  

 

On November 9, 2020, a consultant exercised options to purchase 133,334 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 1,318 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregate exercise price of the options ($8,000) and 132,016 shares were issued.  

 

On November 16, 2020, a consultant exercised options to purchase 133,334 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 1,276 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregate exercise price of the options ($8,000) and 132,058 shares were issued.  

 

On November 16, 2020, a consultant exercised options to purchase 66,667 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 5,104 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregated exercise price of the options ($32,000) and 61,563 shares were issued.  

 

On November 29, 2020, a consultant exercised options to purchase 133,334 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 3,099 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregated exercise price of the options ($22,000) and 130,235 shares were issued. 

 

From December 9, 2020, to January 7, 2021, ten holders of warrants to purchase an aggregate of 409,029 shares of the Company’s common stock exercised such warrants and paid an aggregate exercise price of $1,677,019 to the Company. In connection with such exercises the Company issued such warrant holders an aggregate of 409,029 shares of restricted common stock. 

 

During the quarter ended January 31, 2021, no shares of common stock were issued for services. 

 

Recent issuances of unregistered securities subsequent to our fiscal year ended January 31, 2021

 

On February 1, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 66,666 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 770 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregate exercise price of the options ($4,000) and 65,896 shares were issued on March 24, 2021.

 

On February 17, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 66,666 shares of common stock for cash, pursuant to which the $4,010 aggregate exercise price of the options was paid to the Company and 66,666 shares were issued on March 24, 2021.

 

On February 18, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 133,334 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 2,832 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregate exercise price of the options ($16,000) and 130,502 shares were issued on March 24, 2021.

 

On March 1, 2021, the Company entered into two Business Consultant Agreements with Ontario Inc. and ANS Advisory. Pursuant to the agreements, Vladislav Slava Aizenshtat, acting on behalf of Ontario Inc. and Aaron Neill-Stevens, acting on behalf of ANS Advisory will each be issued $3,000 of shares of common stock per month beginning on March 1, 2021, payable in arears, based on the 7-day average price of the stock leading up to the end of the calendar month and to be issued within 7 days of month end. The Company also agreed to grant Vladislav Slava Aizenshtat, acting on behalf of Ontario Inc. warrants to purchase 120,000 shares of common stock and Aaron Neill-Stevens, acting on behalf of ANS Advisory warrants to purchase 120,000 shares of common stock. On March 22, 2021, the warrants were granted. The Warrants have an exercise price of $5.50 per share (and no cashless exercise rights), and are exercisable until the earlier of (a) March 22, 2023, and (b) the 20th day after the Company provides the holder of the warrants notice that the closing sales price of the Company’s common stock has closed at or above $11.00 per share for a period of ten consecutive trading days.

 

 
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On March 24, 2021, the Company issued 2,000 shares of common stock to Brett Goodman, the son of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, and 2,000 shares of restricted common stock to Jason Silver, pursuant to the terms of the August 10, 2020 Stock Purchase Agreement, for services provided.

 

On March 24, 2021, the Company issued 1,822 shares of common stock to a consultant for services provided.

 

On April 1, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 66,666 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 597 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregated exercise price of the options ($4,000) and 66,069 shares were issued.

 

On April 5, 2021, the Company issued 1,010 shares of restricted common stock to two consultants for services provided. Each consultant was issued 505 shares.

 

On April 5, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 100,000 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 5,077 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregated exercise price of the options ($33,000) and 94,923 shares were issued.

 

On April 5, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 53,334 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 2,708 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregated exercise price of the options ($17,600) and 50,626 shares were issued.

 

On April 7, 2021, a consultant exercised options to purchase 66,666 shares of common stock in a cashless exercise pursuant to which 572 shares were surrendered to the Company to pay for the aggregated exercise price of the options ($4,000) and 66,094 shares were issued.

 

The issuances and grants described above, to the extent not included on a Form S-8 registration statement, were exempt from registration pursuant to Section 4(a)(2), Rule 506 of Regulation D and/or Regulation S of the Securities Act, since the foregoing issuances and grants did not involve a public offering, the recipients took the securities for investment and not resale, we took appropriate measures to restrict transfer, and the recipients were (a) “accredited investors”; (b) had access to similar documentation and information as would be required in a Registration Statement under the Securities Act; (c) were non U.S. persons; and/or (d) were officers or directors of the Company. The securities are subject to transfer restrictions, and the certificates evidencing the securities contain an appropriate legend stating that such securities have not been registered under the Securities Act and may not be offered or sold absent registration or pursuant to an exemption therefrom. The securities were not registered under the Securities Act and such securities may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an exemption from registration under the Securities Act and any applicable state securities laws.

 

The cashless exercises of warrants were exempt pursuant to Section 3(a)(9) of the Securities Act, as no commission or other remuneration was paid or given directly or indirectly for soliciting the exchanges and the Company did not receive any compensation for the issuance of the shares of common stock in connection with such exercises.

 

We claim an exemption from registration provided by Section 4(a)(2) and/or Rule 506(b) of Regulation D of the Securities Act for the above cash warrant exercises. As the shares were acquired for investment only and not with a view towards, or for resale in connection with, the public sale or distribution thereof. The shares were offered without any general solicitation by the Company or its representatives. The shares have not been registered under the Securities Act and such securities may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an exemption from registration under the Securities Act and any applicable state securities laws.

 

Issuer Repurchases of Equity Securities

  

None.

  

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

  

Forward-looking statements

  

The following discussion of the Company’s historical performance and financial condition should be read together with the consolidated financial statements and related notes in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplemental Data” of this Report. This discussion contains forward-looking statements based on the views and beliefs of our management, as well as assumptions and estimates made by our management. These statements by their nature are subject to risks and uncertainties, and are influenced by various factors. As a consequence, actual results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. See “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this report for the discussion of risk factors and see “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” for information the forward-looking statements included below.

   

 
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Overview

 

We derive revenues primarily from licensing fees received from gaming operators located in the Asia Pacific (APAC) region that utilize the Company’s technology.

 

The Company’s goal is to expand our customer base globally and to integrate additional operators, launch additional synergistic products and appoint more distributors. Currently the Company has more than 1.5 million registered users across all gaming operators that utilize the Company’s technology and is currently integrating additional operators to expand this usage.

 

Our financial focus is on long-term, sustainable growth in revenue with the goal of marginal increases in expenses. The Company’s activity is highly scalable. We are highly encouraged by recent revenue growth, clearly demonstrating the acceptance and reputation of the Company’s GM-X System and its gaming content. We plan to continuously add new products to our offerings and anticipate revenue growth assuming we are successful therewith.

 

Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus, which causes the infectious disease known as COVID-19, was reported in Wuhan, China. The World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” on January 30, 2020 and a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. In March and April, many U.S. states and local jurisdictions began issuing ‘stay-at-home’ orders. Although to date we have not experienced any significant issues associated with the ongoing pandemic, the range of possible impacts on the Company’s business from the coronavirus pandemic could include: (i) changing demand for the Company’s products and services; (ii) rising bottlenecks in the Company’s supply chain; and (iii) increasing contraction in the capital markets. At this time, the Company believes that it is premature to determine the potential impact on the Company’s business prospects from these or any other factors that may be related to the coronavirus pandemic; however, it is possible that COVID-19 and the worldwide response thereto, may have a material negative effect on our operations, cash flows and results of operations.

  

Currently we believe that we have sufficient cash on hand, and availability to raise additional funding, or borrow additional funding, as needed, to support our operations for the foreseeable future; however, we will continue to evaluate our business operations based on new information as it becomes available and will make changes that we consider necessary in light of any new developments regarding the pandemic. 

 

The future impact of COVID-19 on our business and operations is currently unknown. The pandemic is developing rapidly and the full extent to which COVID-19 will ultimately impact us depends on future developments, including the duration and spread of the virus, as well as potential seasonality of new outbreaks.

  

Results of Operations

  

Revenues

  

The Company currently has two distinctive revenue streams.

  

1) The Company charges gaming operators for the use of its unique intellectual property (IP) and technology systems. Revenues derived from such charges were based on the usage of the systems by the clients. Total revenues recognized from the usage of our Gaming IP and technology systems in the years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months periods ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018 are shown in the following table:

 

 

 

Years Ended
January 31

 

 

Six Months Ended
January 31

 

 

Years Ended
July 31

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Related party

 

$ 2,248,877

 

 

$ 2,167,773

 

 

$ 1,087,816

 

 

$ 1,349,485

 

 

$ 2,429,442

 

 

$ 915,804

 

Third party

 

 

595,819

 

 

 

1,120,802

 

 

 

670,783

 

 

 

2,752

 

 

 

452,771

 

 

 

-

 

Total

 

 

2,844,696

 

 

 

3,288,575

 

 

 

1,758,599

 

 

 

1,352,237

 

 

 

2,882,213

 

 

 

915,804

 

  

The decrease in revenues for the fiscal year ended 2021, compared to the fiscal year ended 2020, is due to a marginal decrease in revenues from one of our customers.

 

The increase in revenues in the six-month transition period ended January 31, 2020, compared to the six-month period ended January 31, 2019, is attributable to an increase in registered end-users from our third-party customer.  

  

 
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The increase in revenues in fiscal year 2019, compared to fiscal year 2018, is attributable to the addition of a new distributor as well as the global expansion by one of our distributors.: (1) on July 1, 2018, Red Label Technology Pte Ltd and the Company entered into a License Agreement. Red Label desired to license the use of the GM-X System to support its business-to-business (B2B) business. During the year ended July 31, 2019, Red Label Technology Pte Ltd contributed to 16% of the total revenue; and (2) on July 1, 2018, Articulate Pty Ltd and the Company entered into an Addendum to License Agreement (the “Addendum”). Articulate requested that the Company provide system for usage in Malaysian Currency. The new market also contributed to 26% of the total revenue in fiscal year 2019.

   

2) Since June 2020, the Company has contracted with certain clients to offer third party gaming content and as such become a reseller of this gaming content. During the year ended January 31, 2021, $2,378,363 in revenues were derived from the reselling of gaming content. There were no such revenues in the previous years or periods. The Company believes that there is a significant opportunity to scale this new revenue stream with low related expenses and no capital expenditures and also to expand its global reach. The new revenue stream is highly scalable i.e., the running and support costs relative to the incremental revenues are low, and will reduce exponentially as a percentage of revenues as revenues grow. The Company plans to strive to roll out this new product offering to its existing client base and expects to scale up its revenues as a result.

 

Costs of goods sold 

 

The Company currently has two distinctive costs of goods sold.

  

1) The Company recognized the amortization of stock options granted to consultants under the 2018 Equity Incentive Plan as a cost of goods sold. This recognition is based on the fact that the stock options directly contributed to the revenues generated by the Company’s GM2 Asset. The amortization expenses of the consultants’ stock options recognized in the years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months periods ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018 are shown in the following table:

 

 

 

Years Ended
January 31

 

 

Six Months Ended
January 31

 

 

Years Ended
July 31

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Amortization expenses of consultants’ stock options

 

$ 275,780

 

 

$ (59,280 )

 

$ 57,224

 

 

$ 138,502

 

 

$ 21,998

 

 

$ 72,003

 

  

The increase in the option amortization expense in fiscal year 2021, compared to 2020 is attributable to the options issued during the year. The increase in the share price has also increased the option valuation based on the Black-Scholes valuation model and therefore increased the amortization expenses.

 

The decrease in the option amortization expenses in the six-month transition period ended 2020, compared to the six months ended January 31, 2019, and the fiscal year ended 2019, compared to the fiscal year ended July 31, 2018, is due to the adoption of new accounting standard ASU 2018-07, in which the Company was not required to re-value options at each reporting date.

 

2) From June 2020, due to the reselling of the gaming content, the cost of usage of the third-party content is recognized as a cost of goods sold. During the year ended January 31, 2021, $1,724,272 of costs were recognized. There were no such costs before.

 

General and administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of advertising and promotion expenses, travel expenses, website maintenance expenses, and administrative expenses. Total general and administrative expenses in the years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months periods ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018 are shown in the following table:

 

 

 

Years Ended
January 31

 

 

Six Months Ended
January 31

 

 

Years Ended
July 31

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

G&A expense

 

$ 566,593

 

 

$ 337,140

 

 

$ 149,177

 

 

$ 133,376

 

 

$ 321,339

 

 

$ 186,040

 

  

The increase in the general and administrative expenses in fiscal year 2021, compared to 2020, is mainly due to the marketing compensation granted to one of the Company’s customers. As per the Company’s Software Agreement with the customer, if the customer reaches a certain amount of usage (based on net income usage), the customer will be granted marketing compensation of 1% per month.

 

The general and administrative expenses remained consistent during the six-month transition period ended January 31, 2020, compared to the six-month period ended January 31, 2019.

 

 
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The increase in general and administrative expenses in fiscal year 2019, compared to fiscal year 2018, is attributable to the increase in travel expenses and advertising expenses. During the fiscal year 2019, there was a need for increased travel by management overseas to meet suppliers and attend trade shows. The Company also increased its marketing and awareness efforts, which resulted in higher advertising expenses.

   

General and administrative Expenses – Related Parties

 

General and administrative expenses from related parties consist primarily of amortization expenses due to stock options granted to Directors, back-office expenses, consulting expenses and salary expenses payable to the Company's CEO and CFO. The components of general and administrative expenses from related parties in the years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months periods ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018 are shown in the following table:

  

 

 

Years Ended
January 31

 

 

Six Months Ended
January 31

 

 

Years Ended
July 31

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Amortization expenses of Directors’ stock options

 

$ 1,630,403

 

 

$ 484,763

 

 

$ 392,101

 

 

$ 114,180

 

 

$ 206,842

 

 

$ 129,109

 

Back office expenses

 

 

132,000

 

 

 

99,000

 

 

 

66,000

 

 

 

20,200

 

 

 

53,200

 

 

 

27,600

 

Consulting & salary expenses

 

 

288,037

 

 

 

160,380

 

 

 

81,972

 

 

 

68,040

 

 

 

146,448

 

 

 

181,500

 

Total

 

 

2,050,440

 

 

 

744,143

 

 

 

540,073

 

 

 

202,420

 

 

 

406,490

 

 

 

338,209

 

  

During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the amortization expenses increased due to the stock options granted to three Independent Directors under the 2018 Equity Incentive Plan; the back office expenses increased due to the increasing cost per month from $5,500 to $11,000 since August 1, 2019; the consulting expenses increased due to the increasing number of Directors and the consulting services provided by Mr. Brett Goodman, a consultant, and the son of our CEO, who has been engaged in to assist the Company with building a Peer-to-Peer gaming system.

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, the increasing in stock option amortization expenses were due to the stock options granted to our CEO and CFO on September 19, 2019; and the increasing back office expenses were due to the increasing cost per month from $2,300 to $5,500 since December 1, 2018.

 

During the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, the increase in general and administrative expenses from related parties were mainly due to the increase in amortization expenses.

  

Compensation Expense – Acquisition Cost - Related Party

  

The acquisition cost was a result of an Asset Purchase Agreement entered into on February 28, 2018, with Luxor Capital, LLC (“Luxor”), which is wholly-owned by the Company’s Chief Executive Officer Anthony Brian Goodman. Pursuant to the Asset Purchase Agreement, the Company purchased certain Intellectual Property and Know-how (the “GM2 Asset”) and agreed that 50% of the revenues generated by the GM2 Asset during the 12-month period of March 1, 2018 to February 28, 2019 would be paid to Luxor. As of July 31, 2018, the Company estimated a number for the acquisition cost at $1,242,812.

 

 
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During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the acquisition cost was $0 and $6,791. The acquisition cost for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2020, was an adjustment to the estimated number.

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, the acquisition cost was $0 and $84,082, respectively. The acquisition cost for the six months ended January 31, 2019, was an adjustment to the estimated number.

 

During the years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, the acquisition cost was $90,873 and $1,242,812, respectively. The acquisition cost for the year ended July 31, 2019, was an adjustment to the estimated number.

  

Research and development expense

 

Research and development expense was incurred in connection with the building of the Company’s Proprietary Peer-to-Peer gaming system. During the year ended January 31, 2021, the research and development expense was $47,558. There was not research and development expense before.

 

Professional fees 

 

Professional fees consisted primarily of SEC filing fees, legal fees and accounting and audit fees. The professional fees in the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months periods ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, and the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018 are shown in the following table:

 

 

 

Years Ended
January 31

 

 

Six Months Ended
January 31

 

 

Years Ended
July 31

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Professional fees

 

$ 159,091

 

 

$ 57,507

 

 

$ 26,944

 

 

$ 30,068

 

 

$ 60,631

 

 

$ 67,687

 

 

The increase in the professional fees in fiscal year 2021 compared to 2020 is attributable to the corporate actions during the year including the change of fiscal year, stock reverse split and fees in connection with the filing of our NASDAQ uplisting application, which increased the legal service fees for the current year compared to the prior period.

 

The professional fees remained consistent during the six-month transition period ended January 31, 2020, compared to the six-month period ended January 31, 2019, and fiscal year ended July 31, 2019 compared to the fiscal year ended July 31, 2018, due to the fact that audit costs and legal fees also remained fairly consistent over those periods. 

   

Bad Debt Expense

 

During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, bad debt expenses were $0 and $179,396. There was no bad debt expense recorded during this year.

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, bad debt expenses were $10,839 and $0, respectively. As of January 31, 2020, the Company had an accounts receivable of $10,839 from Globaltech Software Services LLC, a Company from which our CEO previously had an interest but does not have an interest as of this date. The amount was over one year past due, so the Company decided to record a bad debt expense for the total amount of $10,839.

 

 
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During the years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, bad debt expenses were $168,557 and $0, respectively. As of July 31 2019, the Company had an accounts receivable of $433,115 for Red Label Technology Pte Ltd. While management is confident that Red Label Technology will settle the debt, it has recorded a bad debt expense in the amount of $168,557.

  

Interest Expense   

 

During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, interest expenses were $11,852 and $63,583, respectively. The decrease of interest expense is mainly due to the decrease in the outstanding balance of notes payable.

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, interest expenses were $26,227 and $7,994 respectively. The principal reason for the increase in the interest expense was that the Company issued a Promissory Note of $1,031,567 to Luxor on April 1, 2019. The interest rate for the Promissory Note was 6% per annum. 

 

During the years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, interest expenses were $45,350 and $162,041 respectively. The principal reason for the decrease in the interest expense was that the Company did not issue any convertible notes during this year, and therefore did not incur any interest expenses due to derivative liabilities.  

 

Gain (loss) on derivative liability - note conversion feature 

 

During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the loss on derivative liability was $0 and $3,182, respectively. The loss on derivative liability during last year was mainly due to the fair value change of derivative liabilities. The Company has settled all the derivative liabilities on January 31, 2020 and thus has no gains or losses on derivative liabilities this year.

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, loss on derivative liability was $0 and $1,899, respectively. The decrease in the expense was mainly due to the settlement of the convertible notes and fair value change of derivative liabilities. 

 

During the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, loss on derivative liability was $5,081 and $165,514, respectively. The decrease in the expense was mainly due to the settlement of the convertible notes. 

 

Gain (loss) on extinguishment of debt 

 

There was no gain or loss on extinguishment of debt for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020.  

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, loss on extinguishment of debt was $0 and $106. The loss was due to the settlement of convertible notes (Convertible Note #46) with LG Capital Funding, LLC. 

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt was $106 for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2019 as compared to gain on extinguishment of debt of $129 for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2018.  

 

Interest income

 

During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, interest income was $1,611 and $26,779, respectively. The decrease in interest income is due to the decrease in the interest from the Wells Fargo bank.  

 

 
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During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, interest income was $18,659 and $0, respectively. The interest income was from interest on amounts held in the Company’s Wells Fargo Saving account which the Company opened in February 2019.

 

During the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, interest income was $8,120 and $0, respectively.

  

Foreign Exchange Gain (loss)  

 

We had $8,996 of foreign exchange gain during the year ended January 31, 2021. The foreign exchange gain was due to the fluctuation of the Euro against the US dollar, and as a result of certain suppliers billing the Company in Euros.

 

Net Income (loss) 

 

During the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, net income was $398,080 and $1,982,892, respectively. The decrease in net income is mainly due to the increase in the option amortization expenses, which increased by $1.4 million for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2021, compared to prior period.

 

During the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019, net income was $966,774 and $753,790. The increase in net income was due to the increase in revenues and the decrease in acquisition costs and costs of goods sold.

 

The Company had net income of $1,769,908 for the financial year ending July 31, 2019 and had a loss of $1,318,373 for the previous year ending July 31, 2018. The increase in net income was due to the increase in revenues and the decrease in acquisition costs, the decrease in interest expenses and the lower derivative expenses as stated above.

  

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

 

 

As of January 31,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$ 11,706,349

 

 

$ 1,856,505

 

Working capital

 

 

13,261,937

 

 

 

2,473,198

 

Shareholders’ equity

 

 

13,261,937

 

 

 

2,473,198

 

  

 

 

Years Ended
January 31

 

 

Six Months Ended
January 31

 

 

Years Ended
July 31

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

Cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

$ 1,878,043

 

 

$ 1,599,319

 

 

$ 986,723

 

 

$ 839,338

 

 

$ 1,451,934

 

 

$ 302,716

 

Cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

 

192

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

 

7,971,610

 

 

 

(861,313 )

 

 

(861,313 )

 

 

(167,420 )

 

 

(167,420 )

 

 

118,698

 

  

 
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The Company had $11,706,349 of cash on hand at January 31, 2021 and total assets of $13,814,547 (all of which were current assets). The Company had total working capital of $13,261,937 as of January 31, 2021. The Company had total liabilities (which were all current liabilities) of $552,610 as of January 31, 2021, which included $208,521 of accounts payable to related parties, $115,314 of consideration payable to Anthony Brian Goodman, the CEO of the Company, for the acquisition of Global Technology Group Pty Ltd, $78,913 of accounts payable and accrued liabilities, and $149,640 of customer deposits.

  

We do not currently have any additional commitments or identified sources of additional capital from third parties or from our officers, directors or majority stockholders. Additional financing may not be available on favorable terms, if at all.

 

In the future, we may be required to seek additional capital by selling additional debt or equity securities, or otherwise be required to bring cash flows in balance when we approach a condition of cash insufficiency. We also plan to sell equity in connection with an underwritten offering pursuant to which we plan to uplist our common stock on The NASDAQ Capital Market, which offering may not be completed on favorable terms, if at all. The sale of additional equity or debt securities, if accomplished, may result in dilution to our then stockholders. Financing may not be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, or at all. In the event we are unable to raise additional funding and/or obtain revenues sufficient to support our expenses, we may be forced to scale down our operations, which could cause our securities to decline in value.

 

See “Note 5 – Notes Payable”, for a description of outstanding notes payable; “Note 7 – Customer Deposits”, for a description of customer deposits; and “Note 8 – Related Party Transactions”, for a description of related party transactions, each included herein under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

 

The Company generated cash from operating activities of $1,878,043, $1,599,319, $986,723, $839,338, $1,451,934 and $302,716 during the calendar years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019 and during the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Cash flows from operating activities include net income adjusted for certain non-cash expenses, and changes in operating assets and liabilities. Significant non-cash expenses for the period include stock-based compensation and imputed interest. The $1,878,043 cash generated during this year was due primarily to $398,080 of net income, and non-cash expenses relating to stock-based compensation (including options issued for services and stock issued for services) which were $1,906,183 during the year ended January 31, 2021. 

 

Net cash provided by investment activities was $192 for the year ended January 31, 2021. There was no cash provided by investing activities for the year ended January 31, 2020. The $192 of cash provided by investment activities during the 2021 fiscal year was due to the acquisition of Global Technology Group Pty Ltd. More details as discussed in “Note 6 – Asset Acquisition – Related Party” to the consolidated financial statements included herein under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”.

  

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities was $7,971,610, $(861,313), $(861,313), $(167,420), $(167,420) and $118,698 for the calendar years ended January 31, 2021, and 2020, the six months ended January 31, 2020 and 2019 and for the fiscal years ended July 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The $7,971,610 cash provided during this year was due primarily to the sales of equity securities in August 2020 and January 2021 through private placements and warrant exercises as discussed in “Note 9 – Equity” to the consolidated financial statements included herein under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data”.

 

 
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Material Events and Uncertainties

 

Our operating results are difficult to forecast. Our prospects should be evaluated in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties commonly encountered by comparable development stage companies.

 

There can be no assurance that we will successfully address such risks, expenses, and difficulties.

 

Off‑Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements including arrangements that would affect our liquidity, capital resources, market risk support and credit risk support or other benefits.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amount of net sales and expenses for each period. The following represents a summary of our critical accounting policies, defined as those policies that we believe are the most important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations and that require management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates about the effects of matters that are inherently uncertain.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation to employees in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 718, “Compensation-Stock Compensation”. ASC 718 requires companies to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments, including stock options, based on the grant date fair value of the award and to recognize it as compensation expense over the period the employee is required to provide service in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. Stock option forfeitures are recognized at the date of employee termination.

 

See also the summary of accounting policies below under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” under “Note 2 – Summary of Accounting Policies.”

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

 

 
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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

GOLDEN MATRIX GROUP, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

 

Page

 

Index to Financial Statements

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

F-1

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

F-2

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

F-3

 

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity (Deficit)

 

F-4

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

F-5

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-6

 

 

 
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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and 

 Stockholders of Golden Matrix Group, Inc.

  

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

  

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Golden Matrix Group, Inc. (the Company) as of January 31, 2021 and 2020, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for the year ended January 31, 2021, six-month transition period ended January 31, 2020, and each of the two years in the period ended July 31, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the financial statements). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of January 31, 2021 and 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the year ended January 31, 2021, six-month transition period ended January 31, 2020, and each of the two years in the period ended July 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

  

Basis for Opinion

  

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

  

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

  

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

  

Critical Audit Matters

  

The critical audit matters communicated below are matters arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matters below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or on the accounts or disclosures to which they relate.

  

Revenue Recognition

  

As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, when another party is involved in providing goods or services to the Company’s clients, a determination is made as to who is acting in the capacity as the principal in the sales transaction. 

  

Auditing management’s evaluation of agreements with customers involves significant judgment, given the fact that some agreements require management’s evaluation of principal versus agent.

  

To evaluate the appropriateness and accuracy of the assessment by management, we evaluated management’s assessment in relationship to the relevant agreements.  

 

M&K CPAS, PLLC

  

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

 

Houston, TX  

 

April 30, 2021

 

 
F-1

Table of Contents

  

GOLDEN MATRIX GROUP, INC

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

 

 

January  31,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$ 11,706,349

 

 

$ 1,856,505

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

1,040,410

 

 

 

791,340

 

Accounts receivable – related parties

 

 

656,805

 

 

 

1,058,874

 

Prepaid expenses

 

 

410,983

 

 

 

-

 

Total current assets

 

 

13,814,547

 

 

 

3,706,719

 

Total assets

 

$ 13,814,547

 

 

$ 3,706,719

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

$ 78,913

 

 

$ 25,621

 

Accounts payable – related parties

 

 

208,521

 

 

 

660,682

 

Advances from shareholders

 

 

99

 

 

 

1,000

 

Accrued interest

 

 

123

 

 

 

41,964

 

Customer deposit

 

 

149,640

 

 

 

-

 

Consideration payable – related party

 

 

115,314

 

 

 

-

 

Settlement payable – related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

290,000

 

Convertible notes payable, net of discounts

 

 

-

 

 

 

30,000

 

Convertible notes payable, net- in default

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,000

 

Promissory note-related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

174,254

 

Total current Liabilities

 

 

552,610

 

 

 

1,233,521

 

Total liabilities

 

$ 552,610

 

 

$ 1,233,521

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, Series A: $0.00001 par value; 19,999,000 shares authorized, none outstanding

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Preferred stock, Series B: $0.00001 par value, 1,000 shares authorized,1,000 and 1,000 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Common stock:  $0.00001 par value; 40,000,000 and 40,000,000 shares authorized; 22,741,665 and 18,968,792 shares issued and outstanding respectively

 

$ 227

 

 

$ 190

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

38,320,729

 

 

 

27,944,652

 

Stock payable

 

 

7,420

 

 

 

-

 

Stock payable – related party

 

 

7,420

 

 

 

-

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

(978 )

 

 

(683 )

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(25,072,881 )

 

 

(25,470,961 )

Total shareholders’ equity

 

 

13,261,937

 

 

 

2,473,198

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

 

$ 13,814,547

 

 

$ 3,706,719

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-2

Table of Contents

  

GOLDEN MATRIX GROUP. INC.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

Years Ended July 31,

 

 

 

January 31, 2021

 

 

January 31, 2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues-related party

 

$ 2,248,877

 

 

$ 1,087,816

 

 

$ 2,429,442

 

 

$ 915,804

 

Revenues

 

 

2,974,182

 

 

 

670,783

 

 

 

452,771

 

 

 

-

 

Cost of goods sold

 

 

(2,000,052 )

 

 

(57,224 )

 

 

(21,998 )

 

 

(72,003 )

Gross profit

 

 

3,223,007

 

 

 

1,701,375

 

 

 

2,860,215

 

 

 

843,801

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

G&A expense

 

 

566,593

 

 

 

149,177

 

 

 

321,339

 

 

 

186,040

 

G&A expense- related party

 

 

2,050,440

 

 

 

540,073

 

 

 

406,490

 

 

 

338,209

 

Compensation expense - Acquisition cost - related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

90,873

 

 

 

1,242,812

 

Professional fees

 

 

159,091

 

 

 

26,944

 

 

 

60,631

 

 

 

67,687

 

Research and development expense

 

 

47,558

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Bad debt expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,839

 

 

 

168,557

 

 

 

-

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

2,823,682

 

 

 

727,033

 

 

 

1,047,890

 

 

 

1,834,748

 

Gain (Loss) from operations

 

 

399,325

 

 

 

974,342

 

 

 

1,812,325

 

 

 

(990,947 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

 

(11,852 )

 

 

(26,227 )

 

 

(45,350 )

 

 

(162,041 )

Interest Earned

 

 

1,611

 

 

 

18,659

 

 

 

8,120

 

 

 

-

 

Foreign exchange gain

 

 

8,996

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Gain (Loss) on extinguishment of debt

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(106 )

 

 

129

 

Loss on derivative liability

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(5,081 )

 

 

(165,514 )

Total other expense

 

 

(1,245 )

 

 

(7,568 )

 

 

(42,417 )

 

 

(327,426 )

Net income (Loss)

 

$ 398,080

 

 

$ 966,774

 

 

$ 1,769,908

 

 

$ (1,318,373 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings (loss) per common share - basic

 

$ 0.02

 

 

$ 0.05

 

 

$ 0.09

 

 

$ (0.17 )

Net earnings (loss) per common share - diluted

 

$ 0.01

 

 

$ 0.03

 

 

$ 0.06

 

 

$ (0.17 )

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding - basic

 

 

19,953,819

 

 

 

18,968,792

 

 

 

18,764,007

 

 

 

7,729,719

 

Weighted average number of common shares outstanding - diluted

 

 

31,588,555

 

 

 

27,862,743

 

 

 

27,593,734

 

 

 

7,729,719

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-3

Table of Contents

 

GOLDEN MATRIX GROUP, INC.

Consolidated Statement of Shareholders’ Equity (Deficit)

 

 

 

Preferred Stock- Series B

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Additional

Paid-in

 

 

Stock

 

 

Stock Payable

Related

 

 

Accumulated Other Comprehensive

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Total Shareholders’

Equity

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Payable

 

 

Party

 

 

Loss

 

 

Deficit

 

 

(Deficit)

 

Balance at July 31, 2017

 

 

1,000

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

940,647

 

 

$ 9

 

 

$ 25,352,197

 

 

$ 1,600

 

 

 

-

 

 

$ (683 )

 

$ (26,889,270 )

 

$ (1,536,147 )

Issuance of shares for convertible notes conversion

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

6,974,976

 

 

 

70

 

 

 

536,935

 

 

 

(1,600 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

535,405

 

Issuance of shares for convertible notes conversion – related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,666,667

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

299,983

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

300,000

 

Issuance of shares for subscription agreement

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,000,000

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

119,980

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

120,000

 

Issuance of shares for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

4,533,333

 

 

 

45

 

 

 

236,655

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

236,700

 

Issuance of shares for settlement of accounts payable –related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,370,409

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

119,986

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

120,000

 

Fair value of options/warrants issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

201,112

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

201,112

 

Net income

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(1,318,373 )

 

 

(1,318,373 )

Balance at July 31, 2018

 

 

1,000

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

17,486,032

 

 

$ 175

 

 

$ 26,866,848

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

$ (683 )

 

$ (28,207,643 )

 

$ (1,341,303 )

Issuance of shares for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

86,667

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

30,099

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

30,100

 

Issuance of shares for settlement of convertible note-related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,396,093

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

209,400

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

209,414

 

Issuance of shares for settlement of conversion note

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

5,311

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

5,311

 

Fair value of options/warrants issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

228,840

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

228,840

 

Imputed interest

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,440

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

16,440

 

Gain on extinguishment of debt-related party

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

114,618

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

114,618

 

Net income

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,769,908

 

 

 

1,769,908

 

Balance at July 31, 2019

 

 

1,000

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

18,968,792

 

 

$ 190

 

 

$ 27,471,556

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

$ (683 )

 

$ (26,437,735 )

 

$ 1,033,328

 

Fair value of options/warrants issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

449,325

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

449,325

 

Settlement of derivative liability

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

15,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

15,000

 

Imputed interest

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

8,771

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

8,771

 

Net income

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

966,774

 

 

 

966,774

 

Balance at January 31, 2020

 

 

1,000

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

18,968,792

 

 

$ 190

 

 

$ 27,944,652

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

$ (683 )

 

$ (25,470,961 )

 

$ 2,473,198

 

Shares issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

66,667

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

37,000

 

 

 

7,420

 

 

 

7,420

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

51,840

 

Shares issued for private placement

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,936,058

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

8,468,845

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

8,468,864

 

Shares issued on exercise of options

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

133,334

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

7,998

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

8,000

 

Shares issued on cashless exercise of options

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,633,175

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

(16 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

FV of option/warrants issued for services

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,906,183

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,906,183

 

Reverse split

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

3,639

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Imputed interest

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

9,776

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

9,776

 

Acquisition of GTG

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(53,709 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(53,709 )

Cumulative Translation adjustment

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(295 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(295 )

Net profit for the quarter

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

398,080

 

 

 

398,080

 

Balances January 31, 2021

 

 

1,000

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

22,741,665

 

 

$ 227

 

 

$ 38,320,729

 

 

$ 7,420

 

 

$ 7,420

 

 

$ (978 )

 

$ (25,072,881 )

 

$ 13,261,937

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

 
F-4

Table of Contents

 

GOLDEN MATRIX GROUP, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

Years Ended July 31,

 

 

 

January 31, 2021

 

 

January 31, 2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

 

$ 398,080

 

 

$ 966,774

 

 

$ 1,769,908

 

 

$ (1,318,373 )

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to cash provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized loss on derivative liabilities-note conversion feature

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

5,081

 

 

 

165,514

 

Fair value of stock option issued for services

 

 

275,780

 

 

 

57,224

 

 

 

21,998

 

 

 

49,200

 

Fair value of shares issued for services

 

 

51,840

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

30,100

 

 

 

201,112

 

Stock based compensation

 

 

1,630,403

 

 

 

392,101

 

 

 

206,842

 

 

 

107,300

 

Loss (Gain) on extinguishment of debt

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

106

 

 

 

(129 )

Imputed Interest

 

 

9,776

 

 

 

8,771

 

 

 

16,440

 

 

 

-

 

Compensation expense-Acquisition-related parties

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

90,873

 

 

 

1,242,812

 

Penalty on convertible notes payable

 

 

-

 

 

 

2,000

 

 

 

8,600

 

 

 

11,800

 

Bad debt expense

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,839

 

 

 

168,557

 

 

 

-

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Increase) decrease in accounts receivable, net

 

 

(249,070 )

 

 

(526,782 )

 

 

(423,110 )

 

 

(10,005 )

(Increase) decrease in accounts receivable – related parties

 

 

(512,627 )

 

 

(60,316 )

 

 

(647,109 )

 

 

(299,788 )

(Increase) decrease in prepaid expense

 

 

(349,765 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

(1,000 )

(Decrease) increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

 

557,943

 

 

 

(15,483 )

 

 

26,713

 

 

 

(11,698 )

(Decrease) increase in accounts payable – related parties

 

 

(42,116 )

 

 

134,141

 

 

 

150,324

 

 

 

111,233

 

(Decrease) increase in customer deposit

 

 

149,640

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

(Decrease) increase in  accrued interest

 

 

(41,841 )

 

 

17,454

 

 

 

25,611

 

 

 

54,738

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$ 1,878,043

 

 

$ 986,723

 

 

$ 1,451,934

 

 

$ 302,716

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash received from Investment in Global Technology Group Pty Ltd– related party

 

 

192

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Net cash provided by investing activities

 

$ 192

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from notes payable 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

38,000

 

Proceeds from sale of stock

 

 

8,468,864

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

120,000

 

Proceeds from option exercise

 

 

8,000

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Repayments on shareholder loans – related party

 

 

(1,000 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Repayments on notes payable

 

 

(40,000 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Repayments on settlement payable

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

(17,420 )

 

 

(39,302 )

Repayments on settlement payable – related party

 

 

(290,000 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

(150,000 )

 

 

-

 

Repayments on promissory note – related party

 

 

(174,254 )

 

 

(861,313 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

$ 7,971,610

 

 

$ (861,313 )

 

$ (167,420 )

 

$ 118,698

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash

 

 

(1 )

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

9,849,844

 

 

 

125,410

 

 

 

1,284,514

 

 

 

421,414

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

 

 

1,856,505

 

 

 

1,731,095

 

 

 

446,581

 

 

 

25,167

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

 

$ 11,706,349

 

 

$ 1,856,505

 

 

$ 1,731,095

 

 

$ 446,581

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental cash flows disclosures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest paid

 

$ 43,918

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

$ 3,419

 

Tax paid

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Settlement of derivative liability

 

$ -

 

 

$ 15,000

 

 

$ 5,311

 

 

$ 160,440

 

Common stock issued for conversion of debt

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 674,961

 

Common stock issued for conversion of debt – related party

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 209,414

 

 

$ -

 

Debt discount from derivative liability

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 3,300

 

 

$ 49,800

 

Settlement payable

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 448,012

 

 

$ 47,919

 

Shares issued for settlement of accounts payable - related party

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 120,000

 

Extinguishment of contingent liability – related party

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 1,031,567

 

 

$ -

 

Gain on extinguishment of contingent liability – related party

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ 114,618

 

 

$ -

 

Accounts payable settled with accounts receivable – related party

 

$ 914,696

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

Cashless exercise of options

 

$ 16

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

$ -

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statement

 

 
F-5

Table of Contents

  

GOLDEN MATRIX GROUP, INC. 

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF BUSINESS AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

Golden Matrix Group, Inc. (“GMGI” or “Company”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 4, 2008, under the name Ibex Resources Corp. The Company’s business at the time was mining and exploration of mineral properties. On September 15, 2009, the Company changed its name to Source Gold Corp. in order to reflect the focus of the Company. In April 2016, the Company changed its name to Golden Matrix Group, Inc., reflected the changing direction of the Company’s business to software technology. GMGI has a global presence with offices in Las Vegas Nevada and Sydney Australia. GMGI’s sophisticated social gaming software supports multiple languages including English and Chinese.

 

On May 12, 2020, the Board of Directors approved a change in the Company’s fiscal year from July 31 to January 31, effectively immediately. Accordingly, in addition to financial statements as of and for the year ended January 31,2021, these financial statements contain six month transitional financial statements as of and for the period ending January 31, 2020.

  

Acquisition of GTG 

 

On December 22, 2020, the Company entered into a Share Purchase Agreement with Anthony Brian Goodman, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and director, and the sole director and owner of Global Technology Group Pty Ltd, a company incorporated in Australia (“GTG”). Under the terms of the Share Purchase Agreement, Mr. Goodman agreed to sell 100% of the shares in GTG to the Company for a total of 85,000 GBP. Given that the entities were under common control, all of the transactions performed by GTG were done at the direction of Mr. Goodman, and substantially all of the fair value of gross assets acquired is concentrated in a group of similar identifiable assets, management determined that the assets acquired do not represent a business. Accordingly, the assets and liabilities of GTG have been recorded at their historical cost basis at the merger date, and are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. As of January 31, 2021, the consideration has not been paid.

  

Henceforth, all references to the “Company” shall mean and include Golden Matrix Group, Inc. and its subsidiary, following the closing of the Share Purchase Agreement.

  

The accompanying consolidated financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). 

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES 

 

Going Concern

  

In connection with the preparation of its financial statements for the fiscal years ended January 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company’s management evaluated the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern in accordance with the ASU 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements–Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40), which requires an assessment of relevant conditions or events, considered in the aggregate, that are known or reasonably knowable by management on the issuance dates of the financial statements which indicated the probable likelihood that the Company will be unable to meet its obligations as they become due within one year after the issuance date of the financial statements. 

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a basis that assumes the Company will continue as a going concern and contemplates the continuity of operations, realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business.

  

 
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Table of Contents

 

As part of its evaluation, management assessed known events, trends, commitments, and uncertainties, which included the profitability of the Company and the cash flow generated by its operations, and the amount of capital recently and/or in the process of being raised.

  

Working capital at January 31, 2021 improved by $10,788,739 from the previous year.

  

As a result of the private placement and warrant exercise in August 2020 and January 2021, 1,936,058 shares of common stock were issued raising net proceeds received of $8,468,864.

  

For the fiscal year ending January 31, 2021, the Company had $11,706,349 in its operating bank accounts and the Company generated $1,878,043 cash provided by operations.

  

Based on its evaluation, management believes that it has completely mitigated the circumstance that led to a doubt with respect to the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern which existed at the time of the filing of the Company’s Transition Report on Form 10-KT for the transition period from August 1, 2019 to January 31, 2020.

  

Principles of Consolidation

  

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Global Technology Group Pty Ltd. (after December 22, 2020). All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

  

Common Control Asset Acquisition

  

A common-control transaction is a transfer of net assets or an exchange of equity interests between entities under the control of the same parent. On January 19, 2021, the Company acquired 100% ownership of Global Technology Group Pty Ltd (GTG), an Australian Company, wholly owned by Mr. Goodman. Mr. Goodman is also a controlling party of the Company via his stock holding in Luxor Capital, which has a controlling vote of greater than 50%. As such the acquisition of GTG was a common control acquisition.

  

The accounting and reporting for a transaction between entities under common control is addressed in the “Transactions Between Entities Under Common Control” subsections of Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 805-50. ASC 805-50 requires that the receiving entity recognize the net assets received at their historical carrying amounts.

  

Use of Estimates

  

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the balance sheet. Significant items subject to such estimates and assumptions include contingent liability, stock-based compensation, warrant valuation and collectability of accounts receivable. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

  

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

  

The allowance for doubtful accounts reflects our best estimate of probable losses inherent in the accounts receivable balance. The Company determines the allowance based on known troubled accounts, historical experience, and other currently available evidence. As of January 31, 2021 and 2020, the allowance for doubtful accounts was $168,557 and $179,396, respectively. During the year ended January 31, 2021, there was no bad debt expense recorded.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

 

 
F-7

Table of Contents

  

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

  

The Company measures its financial assets and liabilities at fair value. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset, or paid to transfer a liability, in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. A three-tier fair value hierarchy prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). These tiers include:

  

 

·

Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets; and

 

 

 

 

·

Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable, such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and

 

 

 

 

·

Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions, such as valuations derived from valuation techniques in which one more significant inputs or significant value drivers are unobservable.

  

Our financial instruments mainly include cash, accounts receivable, prepaid expenses, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, customer deposits, consideration payable and advances from shareholder. The carrying values of these financial instruments approximate their fair value due to their short-term nature.

  

Share-Based Compensation 

 

The Stock-based compensation expense is recorded as a result of stock options granted in return for services rendered. Previously, the share-based payment arrangements with employees were accounted for under Accounting Standards Update (ASU) 718, while nonemployee share-based payments issued for goods and services are accounted for under ASC 505-50. ASC 505-50 differs significantly from ASC 718. On June 20, 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued ASU 2018-07, which simplifies the accounting for share-based payments granted to nonemployees for goods and services. Under the ASU, most of the guidance on such payments to nonemployees would be aligned with the requirements for share-based payments granted to employees. The Company has adopted the new standard and has made some adjustment with regard to the share-based compensation costs in July 2019. Under ASU 2018-07, the measurement of equity-classified nonemployee share-based payments is generally fixed on the grant date, and the options are no longer revalued on each reporting date. The expenses related to the share-based compensation are recognized on each reporting date. The amount is calculated as the difference between total expenses incurred and the total expenses already recognized.

  

Income Taxes

  

The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to temporary differences between the financial statements carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and loss carry-forwards and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in tax rules on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in operations in the year of change. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is “more likely-than-not” that a deferred tax asset will not be realized.

  

Earnings (Loss) Per Common Share

  

Basic net earnings (loss) per common share are computed by dividing net earnings (loss) available to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net earnings (loss) per common share is determined using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period, adjusted for the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents. In periods when losses are reported, the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding excludes common stock equivalents, because their inclusion would be anti-dilutive.

  

The dilutive effect of outstanding stock options and warrants is reflected in diluted earnings per share by application of the treasury stock method. The dilutive effect of outstanding convertible securities is reflected in diluted earnings per share by application of the if-converted method.

  

The following is a reconciliation of basic and diluted earnings (loss) per common share for the fiscal year ended January 31, 2021, six months ended January 31, 2020, and fiscal years ended 2019 and 2018:

 

 

 

Year Ended

January 31, 2021

 

 

Six Months Ended

January 31, 2020

 

 

For the Years Ended

July 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings (loss) per common share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss) available to common shareholders

 

$ 398,080

 

 

$ 966,774

 

 

$ 1,769,908

 

 

$ (1,318,373 )

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

19,953,819

 

 

 

18,968,792

 

 

 

18,764,007

 

 

 

7,729,719

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings (loss) per common share

 

$ 0.02

 

 

$ 0.05

 

 

$ 0.09

 

 

$ (0.17 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted earnings (loss) per common share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss) available to common shareholders

 

$ 398,080

 

 

$ 966,774

 

 

$ 1,769,908

 

 

$ (1,318,373 )

Denominator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

19,953,819

 

 

 

18,968,792

 

 

 

18,764,007

 

 

 

7,729,719

 

Preferred shares

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

-

 

Warrants/Options

 

 

11,633,736

 

 

 

8,838,440

 

 

 

8,774,216

 

 

 

-

 

Convertible Debt

 

 

-

 

 

 

54,511

 

 

 

54,511

 

 

 

-

 

Adjusted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

31,588,555

 

 

 

27,862,743

 

 

 

27,593,734

 

 

 

7,729,719

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted earnings (loss) per common share

 

$ 0.01

 

 

$ 0.03

 

 

$ 0.06

 

 

$ (0.17 )

 

For the year ended July 31, 2018, the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding excludes common stock equivalents, because their inclusion would be anti-dilutive.

  

Revenues

  

The Company currently has two distinctive revenue streams: one is generated via usage of the Company’s software and the other is a royalty charged on the use of third party gaming content.

  

1. For the usage of the Company’s software, the Company charges gaming operators for the use of its unique IP and technology systems.

  

2. For the royalty charged on the use of third party gaming content, the Company acquires the third-party gaming content for a fixed cost and resells the content at a margin.

  

 
F-8

Table of Contents

 

According to Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Topic 606, Revenue Recognition, our company recognizes revenues with the following steps:

  

Step 1: Identify the contract with a customer

  

Step 2: Identify the separate performance obligations in the contract.

  

Step 3: Determine the transaction price.

  

Step 4: Allocate the transaction price to the separate performance obligations in the contract.

  

Step 5: Recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation.

  

For the usage of the Company’s software, the Company provides services to the counterparty which include licensing the use of its unique IP and technology systems. The counterparty pays consideration in exchange for those services which include a variable amount depending on the Software Usage. The Company only recognizes the revenue at the month end when the usage occurs and the revenue is based on the actual Software Usage of its customers.

  

For the royalty charged on the use of third party gaming content, the Company acts as a distributor of the third-party gaming content which is utilized by the client. The counterparty pays consideration in exchange for the gaming content utilized. The Company only recognizes the revenue at the month end when the usage of the gaming content occurs and the revenue is based on the actual usage of the gaming content.

  

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

  

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). Under such guidance, lessees are required to recognize all leases (with the exception of short-term leases) on the balance sheet as a lease liability, which is a lessee’s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis and a right-of-use asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use, or control the use of, a specified asset for the lease term. The new standard was effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within that reporting period, with early application permitted. The new standard was adopted using a modified retrospective approach. The Company does not have any lease agreements or have any contracts that contain lease elements.

  

On June 20, 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, which simplifies the accounting for share-based payments granted to nonemployees for goods and services. Under the ASU, most of the guidance on such payments to nonemployees would be aligned with the requirements for share-based payments granted to employees.

  

For public business entities (PBEs), the amendments in ASU 2018-07 are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods therein. Early adoption is permitted if financial statements have not yet been issued (for PBEs), but no earlier than an entity’s adoption date of ASC 606. If early adoption is elected, all amendments in the ASU that apply must be adopted in the same period. In addition, if early adoption is elected in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period.

  

The Company adopted ASU 2018-07 in the 2019 fiscal year, and has adjusted the share-based compensation costs during that fiscal year. The Company's management believes the new standard can best represent the Company’s operating results. The Company does not believe that any other recently issued effective pronouncements, or pronouncements issued but not yet effective, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying financial statements.

 

 
F-9

Table of Contents

  

Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Consolidated Financial Statements.

  

The outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (“COVID-19”), which was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020, and the related responses by public health and governmental authorities to contain and combat its outbreak and spread has severely impacted the U.S. and world economies. Decreased demand for our products and services caused by COVID-19 could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Separately, economic recessions, including those brought on by the COVID-19 outbreak may have a negative effect on the demand for our products, services and our operating results. The range of possible impacts on the Company’s business from the coronavirus pandemic could include, but are not limited to: (i) changing demand for the Company’s products and services; (ii) the closure of, or reduction in the number of persons who may be present in, establishments using the Company’s technology (resulting in a decrease in demand for such technology); (iii) travel restrictions and stay at home orders; (iv) recessions and other economic contractions which may decrease the amount of discretionary spending available to consumers and/or the amount such consumers are willing to spend; and (v) increasing contraction in the capital markets. At this time, the Company believes that it is premature to determine the potential impact on the Company’s business prospects from these or any other factors that may be related to the coronavirus pandemic.

 

NOTE 3 – ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE – RELATED PARTY

  

Accounts receivable-related party are carried at their estimated collectible amounts. Trade accounts receivable are periodically evaluated for collectability based on past credit history with customers and their current financial condition. The Company has accounts receivable from one related party: Articulate Pty Ltd. (“Articulate”), which is wholly-owned by Anthony Brian Goodman, CEO of the Company and his wife Marla Goodman, which totals $656,805.

 

NOTE 4 – PREPAID EXPENSES

  

The prepaid expenses mainly include credits from our supplier, retainer paid to our corporate attorney, prepaid national press releases, subscription of investor relation feeds, and a one-year Gaming License fee. 

 

NOTE 5 – NOTES PAYABLE

  

Convertible Notes Payable

  

Convertible notes payable at January 31, 2021 and 2020 consisted of the following:

 

 

 

January 31,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Convertible Note #2

 

 

-

 

 

 

30,000

 

Convertible Note #59

 

 

-

 

 

 

10,000

 

Notes payable, principal

 

$ -