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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


(Mark One)

 

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from               to              

Commission File Number: 001‑36439

 


PRECIPIO, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)


 

 

 

Delaware

    

91‑1789357

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

 

4 Science Park, New Haven, CT

 

06511

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

(203) 787‑7888

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

Title of each class

Ticker  symbol(s)   

Name of each exchange on  which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share

PRPO

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes                 No      X

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act.

Yes                 No      X

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes      X         No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

Yes      X           No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act.

 

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act). Yes   ☐    No   ☒

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant based on the last reported closing price per share of Common Stock as reported on the Nasdaq Capital Market on the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter was approximately $19.8 million.

As of March 25, 2020, the number of shares of common stock outstanding was 8,870,129.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

The Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “2020 Proxy Statement”) is incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K to the extent stated herein. The 2020 Proxy Statement, or an amendment to this Form 10-K, will be filed with the SEC within 120 days after December 31, 2019. Except with respect to information specifically incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, the Proxy Statement is not deemed to be filed as a part hereof.

 

 

 

 

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PRECIPIO, INC.

Annual Report on Form 10‑K

For the Year Ended December 31, 2019

INDEX

 

 

 

 

 

Page No.

PART I. 

 

2

Item 1. 

Business

3

Item 1A. 

Risk Factors

10

Item 1B. 

Unresolved Staff Comments

26

Item 2. 

Properties

26

Item 3. 

Legal Proceedings

26

Item 4. 

Mine Safety Disclosures

28

PART II. 

 

29

Item 5. 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

29

Item 6. 

Selected Consolidated Financial Data

29

Item 7. 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

30

Item 7A. 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Price

37

Item 8. 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

38

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

38

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018

39

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

40

 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

41

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

42

 

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

44

Item 9. 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosures

90

Item 9A. 

Controls and Procedures

90

Item 9B. 

Other Information

91

PART III. 

 

92

Item 10. 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance   

92

Item 11. 

Executive Compensation

92

Item 12. 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

92

Item 13. 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

92

Item 14. 

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

92

PART IV. 

 

93

Item 15. 

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

93

Item 16. 

Form 10‑K Summary

97

 

 

 

Signatures 

 

97

 

 

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PART I.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (this “Annual Report”), including  the sections entitled “Risk Factors” “Management’s Discussion & Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Our Business” contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, which statements involve substantial risks and uncertainties. These statements are based on management’s current views, assumptions or beliefs of future events and financial performance and are subject to uncertainty and changes in circumstances. Readers of this report should understand that these statements are not guarantees of performance or results. Many factors could affect our actual financial results and cause them to vary materially from the expectations contained in the forward-looking statements. These factors include, among other things: our expected revenue, income (loss), receivables, operating expenses, supplier pricing, availability and prices of raw materials, insurance reimbursements, product pricing, foreign currency exchange rates, sources of funding operations and acquisitions, our ability to raise funds, sufficiency of available liquidity, future interest costs, future economic circumstances, business strategy, industry conditions and key trends, our ability to execute our operating plans, the success of our cost savings initiatives, competitive environment and related market conditions, expected financial and other benefits from our organizational restructuring activities, actions of governments and regulatory factors affecting our business, projections of future earnings, revenues, synergies, accretion or other financial items, any statements of the plans, strategies and objectives of management for future operations, retaining key employees and other risks as described in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). In some cases these statements are identifiable through the use of words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “target,” “can,” “could,” “may,” “should,” “will,” “would” or the negative of such terms and other similar expressions.

 

You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements we make are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to various assumptions, risks and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements for a number of reasons, including those described in Item 1A, “Risk Factors,” and other factors identified by cautionary language used elsewhere in this Annual Report.

 

We expressly disclaim any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

 

The following discussion should be read together with our financial statements and related notes contained in this Annual Report. Results for the year ended December 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of results that may be attained in the future.

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Item 1. Our Business

Business Description

Precipio, Inc., and its subsidiary, (collectively, “we”, “us”, “our”, the “Company” or “Precipio”) is a cancer diagnostics company providing diagnostic products and services to the oncology market. We have built and continue to develop a platform designed to eradicate the problem of misdiagnosis by harnessing the intellect, expertise and technologies developed within academic institutions, and delivering quality diagnostic information to physicians and their patients worldwide. We operate a cancer diagnostic laboratory located in New Haven, Connecticut and have partnered with various academic institutions to capture the expertise, experience and technologies developed within academia to provide a better standard of cancer diagnostics and aim to solve the growing problem of cancer misdiagnosis. We also operate a research and development facility in Omaha, Nebraska which focuses on development of various technologies, among them IV-Cell, HemeScreen and ICE-COLD-PCR, or ICP, the patented technology, described further below, which we exclusively licensed from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc., or Dana-Farber, at Harvard University. The research and development center focuses on the development of these technologies, which we believe will enable us to commercialize these and other technologies developed with our current and future academic partners. The facility in Omaha was also recently certified as a CLIA and CAP facility, and we have begun conducting several molecular tests internally that we had previously outsourced to other laboratories. Our platform also connects patients, physicians and diagnostic experts residing within academic institutions.

Industry

We believe that there is currently a significant problem with unaddressed rates of misdiagnosis across numerous disease states (particularly in blood-related cancers) due to an inefficient and commoditized industry. We believe that the diagnostic industry focuses primarily on competitive pricing and test turnaround times, at the expense of quality and accuracy. Increasingly complex disease states are met with eroding specialization rather than increased expertise. According to a study conducted by the National Coalition of Health, this results in an industry with cancer misdiagnosis rates up to 28%, which is failing to meet the needs of physicians, patients and the healthcare system as a whole. New technologies offer improved accuracy; however, many are either inaccessible or are not economically practical for clinical use. Despite much publicity of the industry transitioning from fee-per-service to value-based payments, this transition has not yet occurred in diagnostics. When a patient is misdiagnosed, physicians end up administering incorrect treatments, often creating adverse effects rather than improving outcomes. We believe that Insurance Providers, Medicare and Medicaid waste valuable dollars on the application of incorrect treatments and can incur substantial downstream costs. Most importantly however, patients pay the ultimate price of misdiagnosis with increased morbidity and mortality. According to a report by Pinnacle Health, the estimated cost of misdiagnosis within the healthcare system is $750 billion annually. We are of the view that the academic path of specialization produces the critical expertise necessary to correctly diagnose disease and that academic institutions have an unlocked potential to address this problem. Our solution is to create an exclusive platform that harnesses academic expertise and proprietary technologies to deliver the highest standard of diagnostic accuracy and patient care. Physicians, hospitals, payers and, most importantly, patients all benefit from more accurate diagnostics.

Market

As a services and technology commercialization company, we currently participate in two components within the U.S. domestic oncology diagnostics market. The first is the anatomic pathology services market, which is estimated to reach a $26.1 billion annual market by 2024 with a compound annual growth rate of 6.16%. The second component is the reagents market.

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Our Solution

Our Platform

Our platform is designed to provide physicians and their patients access to necessary academic expertise and technology in order to better provide diagnoses. To our knowledge, we are the only company focused on addressing the issue of diagnostic accuracy with an innovative, robust and scalable business model by:

·

Providing physicians and their patients access to world-class academic experts and technologies;

·

Leveraging the largest network of academic experts by adding numerous leading academic institutions to our platform;

·

Allowing payers to benefit from quality-based outcomes to their patients and increase the likelihood of cost savings; and

·

Enabling cross-collaboration between physicians and academic institutions to advance research and discovery.

Our agreements with various academic institutions are part of a unique platform that, to our knowledge, is not offered by other commercial laboratories. Our customers are oncologists who biopsy their patients in order to confirm or rule out the presence of cancer. After our customers send the samples to us, we conduct all the technical tests at our New Haven facility.  We then transmit the test results to the pathologists within our academic network who have access to our laboratory information system from their respective offices, enabling them to review and render their diagnostic interpretation of the test results for reporting. In partnership with an academic institution, we have developed a proprietary algorithm that is applied to each sample submitted to us for testing, resulting in our ability to render a more precise and accurate diagnosis. The final results are prepared by academic pathologists and integrated into the final report by us, and are then delivered electronically through our portal to the referring clinician. The patient’s insurance is billed for the services; we are paid for the technical work done at our laboratory; and academic institutions either bill the patient insurance or are paid by us for their diagnostic interpretation.

Our Technology

 

1.

IV-Cell

 

We have developed IV-Cell, a proprietary culture media that addresses the problem of selective culturing – by creating a universal media that enables simultaneous culturing of all 4 hematopoietic cell lineages. This ensures that no cell lineage is missed in the diagnostic process, and the technician is able to select any of the 4 lineages during the culturing process.

 

The diagnostic process of hematopoietic diseases involves chromosomal analysis by conducting cell-culture based tests by a cytogenetics laboratory to imitate in-vivo conditions. The four groups of cell lineages cultured are:

 

·

Myeloid cells – indicating myeloid neoplasms (MDS, AML, CML);

·

B-cells – indicating B-cell neoplasms (B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma);

·

T-cells – indicating T-cell neoplasms (T-cell lymphoma); and

·

Plasma cells – indicating plasma cell neoplasms (multiple myeloma)

 

The cytogeneticist must decide up front which cell lineage to select to be cultured. In most cases, due to specimen limitation, low cellularity, or cell viability, the cytogeneticist can select only one of the above cell lines to culture. Often, the initial clinical suspicion is not in line with the final diagnosis determined by the pathologist based on the rest of the work up. Our internal data has shown that this occurs in approximately 50% of bone marrow biopsies. If the wrong cell lineage is selected, the diagnosis may be compromised (or return a false negative diagnosis) because the lab will be culturing and investigating the wrong cells.

 

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IV-Cell was validated in our laboratory in parallel with existing commercially available reagents and has successfully demonstrated superior results. Subsequently, IV-Cell has been used at our laboratory for the past 2 years on >1,000 clinical specimens, producing superior diagnostic results. IV-Cell also produces chromosomes with an average band resolution of 500, approximately 25% higher than achieved with standard culture media.

 

We intend to commercialize this technology by providing major laboratories with access to the media. This can be achieved via a direct supply contract, whereby we will contract with a manufacturer (under license) to produce the media, and supply it to laboratories.

 

2.

 HemeScreen

 

Each year, an estimated 140,000 patients are diagnosed with diseases in the MPN or MDS blood cancer categories. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (the “NCCN”) guidelines require that these patients be tested for genetic mutations in four key genes:

 

·

JAK2 (V617F);

·

JAK2 (exon 12);

·

CALR; and

·

MPL

 

Precipio has developed and patented a proprietary screening panel for all 4 genes in one rapid scanning panel, HemeScreen. The test screens for the presence of these mutations in a very economic manner. Due to the improved economics, laboratories can reduce the batch requirements for the test while still enjoying a positive economic model and reducing the turnaround time for results, providing improved clinical service to physicians.

 

The clinical significance of these mutations is substantial to patient treatment. A positive result in either of the JAK2 mutations indicates the patient may be eligible for a targeted therapy. A positive result in the CALR or MPL gene indicates a good prognosis, meaning the disease is less aggressive, and the physician may therefore choose to treat the patient in a less aggressive manner. The results of these genetic tests are critical to determining a treatment plan, and therefore the importance, and the speed of which the results are delivered, may significantly impact patient care.

 

At the current reimbursement levels (approximately $600 for full panel at Medicare rates) and given the costs to run the tests, laboratories running the test in house must either batch samples to gain efficiency, or send the test out to another reference laboratory. Most hospital laboratories don’t have the volume and patient frequency to economically justify running the test, and therefore they send the test out. This has created an industry average turnaround time for results of between 2-4 weeks (depending on the lab providing the test).

   

Precipio offers two HemeScreen commercial options:

 

1.   Reference the send-out to Precipio. We offer an average of a 2-day turnaround time for the test, markedly better than the industry average of approximately 2 weeks.

 

2.   Precipio to provide the reagents on an RUO (Research Use Only) basis, and a laboratory can set up the test In-house test as an LDT (Laboratory Developed Test).

 

At an average reimbursement rate of approximately $600 per test, the US Market Revenue Potential is approximately $84 million per year, in addition to international demand.

 

3.

ICE-COLD-PCR

 

ICP technology was developed at Harvard and is licensed exclusively to us by Dana-Farber. ICP is a unique, proprietary, patented specimen enrichment technology that increases the sensitivity of molecular based tests from approximately 90-95% to 99.99%. Traditional molecular testing is done on tumor biopsies. These tests are typically conducted at disease onset, when the patient undergoes a biopsy. In the typical course of treatment, a patient is rarely re-

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biopsied, and therefore, genetic information is based solely on the initial biopsy. Tumors are known to shed cells into the patient’s bloodstream where they circulate alongside normal cells; however, existing testing methodologies are not sufficiently sensitive to differentiate between tumor and normal cells. The increased sensitivity provided by ICP allows for testing of genetic mutations that occur within tumors to be conducted on peripheral blood samples, termed liquid biopsies. This technical capability enables physicians to test for genetic mutations through a simple blood test rather than an invasive biopsy extracted from the actual tumor. The results of such tests can be used for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic decisions. The technology is encapsulated within a chemical (reagent) used during the specimen preparation process, which enriches (amplifies) the tumor DNA detected within the blood sample while suppressing the normal DNA. In addition to offering this technology as a clinical service, we are developing panels that will be sold as reagent kits to other laboratories to enable this testing in their facilities, thereby improving their test sensitivity and more accurate diagnoses via liquid biopsies. The business model of selling reagents to other laboratories expands the reach and impact of our technology while eliminating the reimbursement risks from running the tests in-house.

 

Gene sequencing is performed on tissue biopsies taken surgically from the tumor site in order to identify potential therapies that will be more effective in treating the patient. There are several limitations to this process. First, surgical procedures have several limitations, including:

 

·

Cost: surgical procedures are usually performed in a costly hospital environment;

·

Surgical access: various tumor sites are not always accessible (e.g. brain tumors), in which cases no biopsy is available for diagnosis;

·

Risk: patient health may not permit undergoing an invasive surgery; therefore, a biopsy cannot be obtained at all; and

·

Time: the process of scheduling and coordinating a surgical procedure often takes time, delaying the start of patient treatment.

 

Second, there are several tumor-related limitations that provide a challenge to obtaining such genetic information from a tumor:

 

·

Tumors are heterogeneous by nature: a tissue sample from one area of the tumor may not properly represent the tumor’s entire genetic composition; thus, the diagnostic results from a tumor may be incomplete and non-representative.

·

Metastases: in order to accurately test a patient with metastatic disease, ideally an individual biopsy sample should be taken from each site (if those sites are even known). These biopsies are very difficult to obtain; therefore, physicians often rely on biopsies taken only from the primary tumor site.

 

We license the ICP technology from Dana-Farber through a license agreement referred to herein as the License Agreement. The License Agreement grants us an exclusive license to the ICP technology, subject to a non-exclusive license granted to the U.S. government, in the areas of mutation detection using Sanger (di-deoxy) sequencing and mitochondrial DNA analysis for all research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic uses in humans, animals, viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants or fossilized material. The License Agreement also grants us a non-exclusive license in the areas of mutation detection using DHPLC, surveyor-endonuclease-based mutation detection and next generation sequencing techniques. We paid Dana-Farber an initial license fee and are required to make milestone payments with respect to the first five licensed products or services we develop using the licensed technology, as well as royalties ranging from high single to low double digits on net sales of licensed products and services for sales made by us and sales made to any distributors. The License Agreement remains in effect until we cease to sell licensed products or services under said agreement. Dana-Farber has the right to immediately terminate the License Agreement if (i) we cease to carry on our business with respect to licensed products and services, (ii) we fail to make any payments under the License Agreement (subject to a cure period), (iii) we fail to comply with due diligence obligations under the License Agreement (subject to a cure period), (iv) we default in our obligations to procure and maintain insurance as required by the License Agreement, (v) any of our officers is convicted of a felony relating to the manufacture, use, sale or importation of licensed products under the License Agreement, (vi) we materially breach any provision of the License Agreement (subject to a cure period), or (vii) we or Dana-Farber become insolvent. We may terminate the License Agreement for convenience upon 180 days’ prior written notice. 

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Our Products & Services

Our initial product offering consists of clinical diagnostic services harnessing the expertise of pathologists from premier academic institutions and the commercialization and application of our various technologies. Our clinical diagnostic services focus on the diagnosis of different hematopoietic or blood-related cancers and the delivery of an accurate diagnosis to oncologists, with demonstrated superior results through the harnessing of subspecialized academic pathologists. We intend to enter into additional partnerships with premiere academic institutions during 2020 that will further broaden and strengthen our academic expert network. Our cutting-edge liquid biopsy technology, ICP, enables detection of abnormalities in blood samples down to as low as .01%. Our proprietary cytogenetics media IV-Cell enables laboratories to arrive at more accurate results while reducing inventory and other operating costs. Our proprietary HemeScreen panel enables hospitals and laboratories to run an important genetic mutation test at a lower cost, resulting in faster results delivered to physicians and their patients. Our customers are oncologists, hospitals, reference laboratories, and pharma and biotech companies. These technologies enable our customers to achieve more accurate results for their patients, with improved economics as well as clinical outcomes.

 

We built and obtained CLIA and CAP certifications to operate our New Haven laboratory. The laboratory is approximately 3,000 square feet and has several sub-departments such as flow cytometry, immuno-histochemistry, cytogenetics, and molecular testing. The laboratory is currently operated by fourteen lab technicians/technologists and is supervised by a laboratory manager, technical director and a medical director. Our laboratory is inspected every two years by a Connecticut state-appointed inspector and/or CAP. Furthermore, the laboratory supervisors and medical director must conduct a self-inspection every two years (rotating with the state inspection) and must submit those results to the state department of health.

 

Our Strategy    

Our objective is to eradicate the problem of misdiagnosis by harnessing the intellect, expertise and technology developed within academic institutions and to deliver quality diagnostic information to physicians and their patients worldwide. To achieve this objective, our strategy is to focus our efforts on the following areas:

·

Clinical pathology services – we intend to continue building our platform by increasing the number of academic experts available on our platform and partnering with other academic institutions, allowing us to expand our portfolio of services to cover additional types of cancer.

 

·

ICE-COLD PCR – we believe we can commercialize and develop new applications for our ICP technology, including:

oDeveloping specific application panels for patient monitoring for treatment resistance and disease recurrence;

oBuilding focused diagnostic and screening panels for initial disease identification;

oLeveraging our platform customers to generate demand for repeat, localized, in-house liquid biopsy testing; and

oApplying ICP technology to other markets, such as pre-natal and companion diagnostics.

·

New product pipeline through outsourced research and development – we plan on utilizing our partnerships with academic institutions to gain access to newly-developed technologies. We also believe there is an opportunity to partner with biotechnology companies to introduce their products into the U.S. market through our platform. In the new line products the Company has developed its patented HemeScreen proprietary assay which substantially reduces the costs for running the assay, creating two key benefits as well as the IV-Cell.

 

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·

Academic partnerships – we intend to leverage the intellectual expertise and technologies developed within academic institutions. We believe we have validated this model through previous partnerships and are currently in the process of adding new academic partners.

Competition

Our principal competition in clinical pathology services comes largely from two groups. The first group consists of companies that specialize in oncology and offer directly competing services to our diagnostic services. These companies provide a high level of service focused on oncology and offer their services to oncologists and pathology departments within hospitals. Competitors in this group include Neogenomics (Genoptix), GenPath Diagnostics and Inform Diagnostics. The second group consists of large commercial companies that offer a wide variety of laboratory tests ranging from simple chemistry tests to complex genetic testing. Competitors in this group include LabCorp and Quest Diagnostics. We believe that companies in this industry primarily compete on price and rapid delivery of results. We have chosen to focus on the increased quality and accuracy of the results we provide. Within the liquid biopsy market, our competitors include Foundation Medicine, Guardant Health and Trovagene, Inc.

Competitive Advantage

We capitalize on the intellectual expertise and technologies developed by experts within academic institutions. While several industry papers report a case misdiagnosis rate as high as 28%, we believe that leveraging academic expertise can significantly reduce this rate. In an initial data set of over 100 clinical cases received and processed by us and with a diagnosis rendered by academic pathologists, we believe less than 1% have resulted in misdiagnosis. The diagnostic report provided by us was then requested by a patient or the patient’s physician for a second opinion to be conducted by another laboratory. In these instances, less than 1% were in disagreement with our report’s original diagnosis. Though less than 5% of all cancer patients are treated in academic centers that benefit from this specialized expertise, the majority of patients are diagnosed by commercial reference laboratories. These commercial laboratories and diagnostic companies have broad access to and serve over 95% of all cancer patients; however, their lack of specialized expertise results in significantly higher misdiagnosis rates. Academic institutions also invest heavily in the development of new technologies, most of which is used internally and does not benefit outside or commercial lab patients. Our platform provides all patients with access to these innovative technologies developed by us and in collaboration with other academic institutions we engage with.

Government Regulation

The healthcare industry is subject to extensive regulation by a number of governmental entities at the federal, state and local level. Laws and regulations in the healthcare industry are extremely complex and, in many instances, the industry does not have the benefit of significant regulatory or judicial interpretation. Our business is impacted not only by those laws and regulations that are directly applicable to us but also by certain laws and regulations that are applicable to our payors, vendors and referral sources. While our management believes we are in compliance with all of the existing laws and regulations applicable to us, such laws and regulations are subject to rapid change and often are uncertain in their application and enforcement. Further, to the extent we engage in new business initiatives, we must continue to evaluate whether new laws and regulations are applicable to us. There can be no assurance that we will not be subject to scrutiny or challenge under one or more of these laws or that any enforcement actions would not be successful. Any such challenge, whether or not successful, could have a material adverse effect upon our business and consolidated financial statements.

 

Our current active laboratory certifications can be found on http://www.precipiodx.com/accreditations.html. The laboratory operations are governed by Standard Operating Procedure manuals, or SOPs, which detail each aspect of the laboratory environment including the work flow, quality control, maintenance, and safety. These SOPs are reviewed and approved annually and signed off by the laboratory manager and medical director.

 

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Among the various federal and state laws and regulations that may govern or impact our current and planned operations are the following:

Reimbursement

 

As blood-related cancers are more likely to be developed later in life, the largest insurance provider is Medicare, which constitutes approximately 50% of our patients’ cases. Non-Medicare patients are typically insured by private insurance companies who provide patient coverage and pay for patients’ health-related costs. These private insurance companies will often adjust their rates according to the insurance rates annually published by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS. We, and other providers, typically bill according to the codes relevant to the tests we conduct.

Medicare and Medicaid Reimbursement

Many of the services that we provide are reimbursed by Medicare and state Medicaid programs and are therefore subject to extensive government regulation.

 

Medicare is a federally funded program that provides health insurance coverage for qualified persons age 65 or older, some disabled persons, and persons with end-stage renal disease and persons with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Medicaid programs are jointly funded by the federal and state governments and are administered by states under approved plans.

 

Medicaid provides medical benefits to eligible people with limited income and resources and people with disabilities, among others. Although the federal government establishes general guidelines for the Medicaid program, each state sets its own guidelines regarding eligibility and covered services. Some individuals, known as “dual eligibles”, may be eligible for benefits under both Medicare and a state Medicaid program. Reimbursement under the Medicare and Medicaid programs is contingent on the satisfaction of numerous rules and regulations, including those requiring certification and/or licensure. Congress often enacts legislation that affects the reimbursement rates under government healthcare programs.

 

Approximately 45% of our revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 was derived directly from Medicare, Medicaid or other government-sponsored healthcare programs. Also, we indirectly provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and other government-sponsored healthcare programs through managed care entities. Should there be material changes to federal or state reimbursement methodologies, regulations or policies, our direct reimbursements from government-sponsored healthcare programs, as well as service fees that relate indirectly to such reimbursements, could be adversely affected.

Healthcare Reform

In recent years, federal and state governments have considered and enacted policy changes designed to reform the healthcare industry. The most prominent of these healthcare reform efforts, the Affordable Care Act, has resulted in sweeping changes to the U.S. system for the delivery and financing of health care. As currently structured, the Affordable Care Act increases the number of persons covered under government programs and private insurance; furnishes economic incentives for measurable improvements in health care quality outcomes; promotes a more integrated health care delivery system and the creation of new health care delivery.

Research and Development Expenses

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we recorded $1.2 million and $1.1 million, respectively, of research and development expenses. More information regarding our research and development activities can be found in the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under Item 7 of this Annual Report.

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Employees

As of March 15, 2020,  Precipio employed fifty  (50)  employees on a full-time basis and one (1) employee on a part-time basis. Of the total, twelve (12) were in Finance, General and Administration, fifteen (15) were in laboratory operations, twelve  (12) were in Sales and Marketing, five  (5) were in Customer Service and Support and seven (7) were in Research & Development.

Executive Officers of the Registrant

Our executive officers, their ages as of March 27, 2020 and their respective positions are as follows:

 

Ilan Danieli, Chief Executive Officer, age 48

 

Mr. Danieli was the founder of Precipio Diagnostics LLC and was the Chief Executive Officer of Precipio Diagnostics LLC since 2011. Mr. Danieli assumed the role of Chief Executive Officer of Precipio, Inc. at the time of the Merger (as defined below). With over 20 years managing small and medium-size companies, some of his previous experiences include COO of Osiris, a publicly-traded company based in New York City with operations in the US, Canada, Europe and Asia; VP of Operations for Laurus Capital Management, a multi-billion dollar hedge fund; and in various other entrepreneurial ventures. Ilan holds an MBA from the Darden School at the University of Virginia, and a BA in Economics from Bar-Ilan University in Israel.

 

Carl R. Iberger, Chief Financial Officer, age 67 

 

Mr. Iberger was named Chief Financial Officer in October 2016. For the years 1990 through 2015, Mr. Iberger held the positions of Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President at Dianon Systems, DigiTrace Care Services and SleepMed, Inc. Mr. Iberger has significant diagnostic healthcare experience in mergers and acquisitions, private equity transactions, public offerings and executive management in high growth environments. Mr. Iberger holds a Masters Degree in Finance from Hofstra University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting from the University of Connecticut.

 

Compliance with Environmental Laws

 

We believe we are in compliance with current environmental protection requirements that apply to us or our business. Costs attributable to environmental compliance are not currently material.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We license the ICP technology from Dana-Farber through the License Agreement. The License Agreement grants us an exclusive license to the ICP technology, subject to a non-exclusive license granted to the U.S. government, in the areas of mutation detection using Sanger (di-deoxy) sequencing and mitochondrial DNA analysis for all research, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic uses in humans, animals, viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants or fossilized material. The Company has filed provisional patents for its proprietary HemeScreen and IV-Cell technologies.

Corporate History 

Precipio, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware on March 6, 1997. Our principal office is located at 4 Science Park, New Haven, Connecticut 06511.

Our internet address is www.precipiodx.com. Information found on our website is not incorporated by reference into this report. We make available free of charge through our website our Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, filings furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

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The following risks and uncertainties, together with all other information in this Annual Report on Form 10‑K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes, should be considered carefully. Any of the risk factors we describe below could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations, and could cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate or decline.

Risks Related to Our Business and Strategy

There is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

Our independent registered public accounting firm has issued an opinion on our consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10‑K that states that the consolidated financial statements were prepared assuming we will continue as a going concern. Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America applicable for a going concern, which assume that we will realize our assets and discharge our liabilities in the ordinary course of business. We have incurred substantial operating losses and have used cash in our operating activities for the past few years. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we had a net loss of $13.2 million, negative working capital of $2.5 million and net cash used in operating activities of $9.1 million. We are not current in making payments to all lenders and vendors. Our consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments to the amounts and classification of assets and liabilities that may be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern. We also cannot be certain that additional financing, if needed, will be available on acceptable terms, or at all, and our failure to raise capital when needed could limit our ability to continue our operations. There remains substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for the next twelve months from the date the consolidated financial statements were issued.

To date, we have experienced negative cash flow from development of our diagnostic technology, as well as from the costs associated with establishing a laboratory and building a sales force to market our products and services. We expect to incur substantial net losses for the foreseeable future to further develop and commercialize our diagnostic technology. We also expect that our selling, general and administrative expenses will continue to increase due to the additional costs associated with market development activities and expanding our staff to sell and support our products. Our ability to achieve or, if achieved, sustain profitability is based on numerous factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the market acceptance of our products, competitive product development and our market penetration and margins. We may never be able to generate sufficient revenue to achieve or, if achieved, sustain profitability.

Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with further development and commercialization of our diagnostic technology and any future tests, we are unable to predict the extent of any future losses or when we will become profitable, if ever. We may never become profitable and you may never receive a return on an investment in our securities. An investor in our securities must carefully consider the substantial challenges, risks and uncertainties inherent in the development and commercialization of tests in the medical diagnostic industry. We may never successfully commercialize our diagnostic technology or any future tests, and our business may fail.

We will require significant additional financing to sustain our operations and without it we will not be able to continue operations. 

 

At December 31, 2019, we had a working capital deficit of $2.5 million. We had an operating cash flow deficit of $9.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and a net loss of $13.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. We do not currently have sufficient financial resources to fund our operations or those of our subsidiary. Therefore, we need additional funds to continue these operations.

 

To facilitate ongoing operations and product development, on September 7, 2018, the Company entered into a purchase agreement with Lincoln Park (the “LP Purchase Agreement” or “Equity Line”), pursuant to which Lincoln Park has agreed to purchase up to an aggregate of $10,000,000 of common stock of the Company (subject to certain limitations) from time to time over the term of the LP Purchase Agreement.

 

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On December 20, 2018 the Company obtained shareholder approval of the $10,000,000 Lincoln Park Purchase Agreement. Per the terms of the LP Purchase Agreement, we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase up to $10,000,000 worth of shares of our common stock under our agreement over a 24-month period generally in amounts up to 30,000 shares of our common stock, which may be increased to up to 36,666 shares of our common stock depending on the market price of our common stock at the time of sale and subject to a maximum commitment by Lincoln Park of $1,000,000 per regular purchase, on any business day on which the closing price of our common stock is not less than the Floor Price, defined as the lower of (i) $1.50 per share (subject to adjustment for any reorganization, recapitalization, non-cash dividend, stock split, reverse stock split or other similar transaction as provided in the LP Purchase Agreement) and (ii) $0.10 per share.  

 

The extent we rely on Lincoln Park as a source of funding will depend on a number of factors including, the prevailing market price of our common stock and the extent to which we are able to secure working capital from other sources. If obtaining sufficient funding from Lincoln Park were to prove unavailable or prohibitively dilutive, we will need to secure another source of funding in order to satisfy our working capital needs. Even if we sell all $10,000,000 under the Purchase Agreement to Lincoln Park, we may still need additional capital to fully implement our business, operating and development plans. Should the financing we require to sustain our working capital needs be unavailable or prohibitively expensive when we require it, the consequences could be a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition and prospects. As of the date the consolidated financial statements were issued, we have already received an aggregate of  $9.3 million, including approximately $1.4 million from the sale of 328,590 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park during 2018, $6.6 million from the sale of 2,778,077 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park during 2019, and $1.3 million from the sale of 900,012 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park from January 1, 2020 through the date the consolidated financial statements were issued.

We will need to raise substantial additional capital to commercialize our diagnostic technology, and our failure to obtain funding when needed may force us to delay, reduce or eliminate our product development programs or collaboration efforts or force us to restrict or cease operations.

As of December 31, 2019, we had cash of $0.8 million and our working capital was approximately negative $2.5 million. Due to our recurring losses from operations and the expectation that we will continue to incur losses in the future, we will be required to raise additional capital to complete the development and commercialization of our current product candidates and to pay off our obligations. To date, to fund our operations and develop and commercialize our products, we have relied primarily on equity and debt financings. When we seek additional capital, we may seek to sell additional equity and/or debt securities or to obtain a credit facility, which we may not be able to do on favorable terms, or at all. Our ability to obtain additional financing will be subject to a number of factors, including market conditions, our operating performance and investor sentiment. If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue the development and/or commercialization of one or more of our product candidates, restrict or cease our operations or obtain funds by entering into agreements on unattractive terms.

We have incurred losses since our inception and expect to incur losses for the foreseeable future. We cannot be certain that we will achieve or sustain profitability.

We have incurred losses since our inception and expect to incur losses in the future. As of December 31, 2019, we had a net loss of $13.2 million, negative working capital of $2.5 million and net cash used in operating activities of $9.1 million. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we have experienced negative cash flow from development of our diagnostic technology, as well as from the costs associated with establishing a laboratory and building a sales force to market our products and services. We expect to incur substantial net losses for the foreseeable future to further develop and commercialize our diagnostic technology. We also expect that our selling, general and administrative expenses will continue to increase due to the additional costs associated with market development activities and expanding our staff to sell and support our products. Our ability to achieve or, if achieved, sustain profitability is based on numerous factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the market acceptance of our products, competitive product development and our market penetration and margins. We may never be able to generate sufficient revenue to achieve or, if achieved, sustain profitability.

 

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Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with further development and commercialization of our diagnostic technology and any future tests, we are unable to predict the extent of any future losses or when we will become profitable, if ever. We may never become profitable and you may never receive a return on an investment in our securities. An investor in our securities must carefully consider the substantial challenges, risks and uncertainties inherent in the development and commercialization of tests in the medical diagnostic industry. We may never successfully commercialize our diagnostic technology or any future tests, and our business may fail.

 

We are subject to concentrations of revenue risk and concentrations of credit risk in accounts receivable.

 

We have had several customers who have individually represented 10% or more of our total revenue, or whose accounts receivable balances individually represented 10% or more of our total accounts receivable.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, two customers represented approximately 30% of our total revenue and for the year ended December 31, 2018 one customer accounted for 33% of our total revenue.  We expect to maintain the relationship with these customers, however, the loss of, or significant decrease in demand from, any of our top customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

At December 31, 2019, two customers accounted for approximately 29% of our total accounts receivable and at December 31, 2018 one customer accounted for 23% of our total accounts receivable.  The business risks associated with this concentration, including increased credit risks for these and other customers and the possibility of related bad debt write-offs, could negatively affect our margins and profits. Additionally, the loss of any of our top customers, whether through competition or consolidation, or a disruption in sales to such a customer, could result in a decrease of the Company’s future sales, earnings and cash flows.  Generally, we do not require collateral or other securities to support our accounts receivable and while we are directly affected by the financial condition of our customers, management does not believe significant credit risks exist at December 31, 2019.

We have been, and may continue to be, subject to costly litigation.

We have been, and may continue to be, subject to legal proceedings. Due to the nature of our business and our lack of sufficient capital resources to pay our obligations on a timely basis, we may be subject to a variety of regulatory investigations, claims, lawsuits and other proceedings in the ordinary course of our business. The results of these legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty due to the uncertainty inherent in litigation, including the effects of discovery of new evidence or advancement of new legal theories, the difficulty of predicting decisions of judges and juries and the possibility that decisions may be reversed on appeal. Such litigation has been, and in the future, could be, costly, time-consuming and distracting to management, result in a diversion of resources and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

In addition, we may settle some litigation through the issuance of equity securities which may result in significant dilution to our stockholders.

The commercial success of our product candidates will depend upon the degree of market acceptance of these products among physicians, patients, health care payers and the medical community and on our ability to successfully market our product candidates.

Our products may never gain significant acceptance in the marketplace and, therefore, may never generate substantial revenue or profits for us. Our ability to achieve commercial market acceptance for our existing and future products will depend on several factors, including:

·

our ability to convince the medical community of the clinical utility of our products and their potential advantages over existing diagnostics technology;

·

the willingness of physicians and patients to utilize our products; and

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the agreement by commercial third-party payers and government payers to reimburse our products, the scope and amount of which will affect patients’ willingness or ability to pay for our products and will likely heavily influence physicians’ decisions to recommend our products.

In addition, physicians may rely on guidelines issued by industry groups, such as the NCCN, medical societies, such as the College of American Pathologists, or CAP, or other key oncology-related organizations before utilizing any diagnostic test. Although we have a study underway to demonstrate the clinical utility of our existing products, none of our products are, and may never be, listed in any such guidelines.

 

We believe that publications of scientific and medical results in peer-reviewed journals and presentations at leading conferences are critical to the broad adoption of our products. Publication in leading medical journals is subject to a peer-review process, and peer reviewers may not consider the results of studies involving our products sufficiently novel or worthy of publication. The failure to be listed in physician guidelines or to be published in peer-reviewed journals could limit the adoption of our products. Failure to achieve widespread market acceptance of our products would materially harm our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

If we cannot compete successfully with our competitors, including new entrants in the market, we may be unable to increase or sustain our revenue or achieve and sustain profitability.

The medical diagnostic industry is intensely competitive and characterized by rapid technological progress. We face significant competition from competitors ranging in size from diversified global companies with significant research and development resources to small, specialized firms whose narrower product lines may allow them to be more effective in deploying related PCR technology in the genetic diagnostic industry. Our closest competitors fall largely into two groups, consisting of companies that specialize in oncology and offer directly competing services to our diagnostic services, offering their services to oncologists and pathology departments within hospitals, as well as large commercial companies that offer a wide variety of laboratory tests that range from simple chemistry tests to complex genetic testing. The technologies associated with the molecular diagnostics industry are evolving rapidly and there is intense competition within such industry. Certain molecular diagnostics companies have established technologies that may be competitive to our product candidates and any future tests that we develop. Some of these tests may use different approaches or means to obtain diagnostic results, which could be more effective or less expensive than our tests for similar indications. Moreover, these and other future competitors have or may have considerably greater resources than we do in terms of technology, sales, marketing, commercialization and capital resources. These competitors may have substantial advantages over us in terms of research and development expertise, experience in clinical studies, experience in regulatory issues, brand name exposure and expertise in sales and marketing as well as in operating central laboratory services. Many of these organizations have financial, marketing and human resources greater than ours; therefore, there can be no assurance that we can successfully compete with present or potential competitors or that such competition will not have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial position or results of operations.

 

We are currently engaged in a study, which commenced in July 2017, to demonstrate the impact of academic pathology expertise on diagnostic accuracy. There is no assurance that this study, or other studies or trials we may conduct, will demonstrate favorable results. If the results of this study, or other studies or trials we may conduct, demonstrate unfavorable or inconclusive results, customers may choose our competitors’ products over our products and our commercial opportunities may be reduced or eliminated.

 

We believe that many of our competitors spend significantly more on research and development-related activities than we do. Our competitors may discover new diagnostic tools or develop existing technologies to compete with our diagnostic technology. Our commercial opportunities will be reduced or eliminated if these competing products are more effective, are more convenient or are less expensive than our product candidates.

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We may not be able to develop new products or enhance the capabilities of our systems to keep pace with rapidly changing technology and customer requirements, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results.

Our success depends on our ability to develop new products and applications for our diagnostic technology in existing and new markets, while improving the performance and cost-effectiveness of our systems. New technologies, techniques or products could emerge that might offer better combinations of price and performance than our current or future products and systems. Existing or future markets for our products, as well as potential markets for our diagnostic product candidates, are characterized by rapid technological change and innovation. It is critical to our success that we anticipate changes in technology and customer requirements and successfully introduce new, enhanced and competitive technologies to meet our customers’ and prospective customers’ needs on a timely and cost-effective basis. At the same time, however, we must carefully manage the introduction of new products. If customers believe that such products will offer enhanced features or be sold for a more attractive price, they may delay purchases until such products are available. We may also have excess or obsolete inventory of older products as we transition to new products and our experience in managing product transitions is very limited. If we do not successfully innovate and introduce new technology into our product lines or effectively manage the transitions to new product offerings, our revenues and results of operations will be adversely impacted.

 

Competitors may respond more quickly and effectively than we do to new or changing opportunities, technologies, standards or customer requirements. We anticipate that we will face increased competition in the future as existing companies and competitors develop new or improved products and as new companies enter the market with new technologies.

 

We currently depend on the services of pathologists at a single academic partner and the loss of the services of these pathologists would adversely impact our ability to develop, commercialize and deliver our products.

We currently depend on the services of pathologists at a single academic partner to review and render their diagnostic interpretation of our test results and to prepare the final diagnostic results that we integrate into our final report for our customers. Although we are in the process of adding new academic partners, it would be difficult to replace the services provided by the pathologists at our current partner if their services became unavailable to us for any reason prior to adding other academic partners. If this academic partner does not successfully carry out its contractual duties or obligations and meet expected deadlines; if this partner needs to be replaced, or if the quality or accuracy of the services provided by the pathologists at this partner were compromised for any reason, we would likely not be able to provide our services in a manner expected by our customers, and our financial results and the commercial prospects for our products could be harmed. The loss of the services of these pathologists would severely harm our ability to develop, commercialize and deliver our products, and our business, financial condition and operating results would be materially adversely affected.

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We face risks related to health pandemics and other widespread outbreaks of contagious disease, including the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, which could significantly disrupt our operations and impact our financial results.

Our business could be disrupted and materially adversely affected by the recent outbreak of COVID-19. In December 2019, an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a strain of novel coronavirus, COVID-19, began in China. As of March 2020, that outbreak has led to numerous confirmed cases worldwide, including in the United States. The outbreak and government measures taken in response have also had a significant impact, both direct and indirect, on businesses and commerce. Global health concerns, such as coronavirus, could also result in social, economic, and labor instability in the countries in which we or the third parties with whom we engage operate. The future progression of the outbreak and its effects on our business and operations are uncertain. We cannot presently predict the scope and severity of any potential business shutdowns or disruptions.  There can be no assurance that we will be able to avoid any impact from the spread of COVID-19 or its consequences, including downturns in global economies and financial markets that could affect our future operating results.

We may experience temporary disruptions and delays in processing biological samples at our facilities.

We may experience delays in processing biological samples caused by software and other errors. Any delay in processing samples could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We depend upon a limited number of key personnel, and if we are not able to retain them or recruit additional qualified personnel, the commercialization of our product candidates and any future tests that we develop could be delayed or negatively impacted.

Our success is largely dependent upon the continued contributions of our officers and employees. Our success also depends in part on our ability to attract and retain highly qualified scientific, commercial and administrative personnel. In order to pursue our test development and commercialization strategies, we will need to attract and hire additional personnel with specialized experience in a number of disciplines, including assay development, laboratory and clinical operations, sales and marketing, billing and reimbursement. There is intense competition for personnel in the fields in which we operate. If we are unable to attract new employees and retain existing employees, the development and commercialization of our product candidates and any future tests could be delayed or negatively impacted. If any of them becomes unable or unwilling to continue in their respective positions, and we are unable to find suitable replacements, our business and financial results could be materially negatively affected.

We will need to increase the size of our organization, and we may experience difficulties in managing growth.

We are a small company with 50 full-time employees as of March 15, 2020. Future growth will impose significant added responsibilities on members of management, including the need to identify, attract, retain, motivate and integrate highly skilled personnel. We may increase the number of employees in the future depending on the progress of our development of diagnostic technology. Our future financial performance and our ability to commercialize our product candidates and to compete effectively will depend, in part, on our ability to manage any future growth effectively. To that end, we must be able to:

·

integrate additional management, administrative, manufacturing and regulatory personnel;

·

maintain sufficient administrative, accounting and management information systems and controls; and

·

hire and train additional qualified personnel.

We may not be able to accomplish these tasks, and our failure to accomplish any of them could harm our financial results.

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We currently have limited experience in marketing products. If we are unable to establish marketing and sales capabilities and retain the proper talent to execute on our sales and marketing strategy, we may not be able to generate product revenue.

We have developed limited experience in marketing our products and services. We intend to continue to develop our in-house marketing organization and sales force, which will require significant capital expenditures, management resources and time. We will have to compete with other diagnostic companies to recruit, hire, train and retain marketing and sales personnel.

 

If we are unable to further grow our internal sales, marketing and distribution capabilities, we may pursue collaborative arrangements regarding the sales and marketing of our product candidates or future products, however, we may not be able to establish or maintain such collaborative arrangements, or if we are able to do so, they may not have effective sales forces. Any revenue we receive will depend upon the efforts of such third parties, which may not be successful. We may have little or no control over the marketing and sales efforts of such third parties and our revenue from product sales may be lower than if we had commercialized our product candidates ourselves. We also face competition in our search for third parties to assist us with the sales and marketing efforts of our product candidates.

Cybersecurity risks could compromise our information and expose us to liability, which may harm our ability to operate effectively and may cause our business and reputation to suffer.

Cybersecurity refers to the combination of technologies, processes and procedures established to protect information technology systems and data from unauthorized access, attack, or damage. We rely on our information systems to provide security for processing, transmission and storage of confidential information about our patients, customers and personnel, such as names, addresses and other individually identifiable information protected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, (“HIPAA”), other privacy laws. Cyber-attacks are increasingly more common, including in the health care industry. The regulatory environment surrounding information security and privacy is increasingly demanding, with the frequent imposition of new and changing requirements. Compliance with changes in privacy and information security laws and with rapidly evolving industry standards may result in our incurring significant expense due to increased investment in technology and the development of new operational processes.

 

We have not experienced any known attacks on our information technology systems that compromised any confidential information. We maintain our information technology systems with safeguard protection against cyber-attacks including passive intrusion protection, firewalls and virus detection software. However, these safeguards do not ensure that a significant cyber-attack could not occur. Although we have taken steps to protect the security of our information systems and the data maintained in those systems, it is possible that our safety and security measures will not prevent the systems’ improper functioning or damage or the improper access or disclosure of personally identifiable information such as in the event of cyber-attacks.

 

Security breaches, including physical or electronic break-ins, computer viruses, attacks by hackers and similar breaches can create system disruptions or shutdowns or the unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. If personal information or protected health information is improperly accessed, tampered with or disclosed as a result of a security breach, we may incur significant costs to notify and mitigate potential harm to the affected individuals, and we may be subject to sanctions and civil or criminal penalties if we are found to be in violation of the privacy or security rules under HIPAA or other similar federal or state laws protecting confidential personal information. In addition, a security breach of our information systems could damage our reputation, subject us to liability claims or regulatory penalties for compromised personal information and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our ability to use net operating loss carryforwards to offset future taxable income for U.S. federal tax purposes is subject to limitation and risk that could further limit our ability to utilize our net operating losses.

Under U.S. federal income tax law, a corporation’s ability to utilize its net operating losses, or NOLs, to offset future taxable income may be significantly limited if it experiences an “ownership change” as defined in Section 382 of

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the Internal Revenue Code, as amended. In general, an ownership change will occur if there is a cumulative change in a corporation’s ownership by “5‑percent shareholders” that exceeds 50 percentage points over a rolling three-year period. A corporation that experiences an ownership change will generally be subject to an annual limitation on the use of its pre-ownership change NOLs equal to the value of the corporation immediately before the ownership change, multiplied by the long-term tax-exempt rate (subject to certain adjustments). The annual limitation for a taxable year generally is increased by the amount of any “recognized built-in gains” for such year and the amount of any unused annual limitation in a prior year. On December 22, 2017, a law commonly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, or the TCJ Act, was enacted in the United States. Certain provisions of the TCJ Act impact the ability to utilize NOLs generated in 2018 and forward; any limitation to our annual use of NOLs could require us to pay a greater amount of U.S. federal (and in some cases, state) income taxes, which could reduce our after-tax income from operations for future taxable years and adversely impact our financial condition. Beginning in 2018, under the Act, federal loss carryforwards have an unlimited carryforward period, however such losses can only offset 80% of taxable income in any one year.

Reimbursement and Regulatory Risks Relating to Our Business

Governmental payers and health care plans have taken steps to control costs.

Medicare, Medicaid and private insurers have increased their efforts to control the costs of health care services, including clinical testing services. They may reduce fee schedules or limit/exclude coverage for certain types of tests that we perform. Medicaid reimbursement varies by state and is subject to administrative and billing requirements and budget pressures. We expect efforts to reduce reimbursements, impose more stringent cost controls and reduce utilization of testing services will continue. These efforts, including changes in laws or regulations, may have a material adverse impact on our business.

Changes in payer mix could have a material adverse impact on our net sales and profitability.

Testing services are billed to physicians, patients, government payers such as Medicare, and insurance companies. Tests may be billed to different payers depending on a particular patient’s medical insurance coverage. Government payers have increased their efforts to control the cost, utilization and delivery of health care services as well as reimbursement for laboratory testing services. Further reductions of reimbursement for Medicare and Medicaid services or changes in policy regarding coverage of tests or other requirements for payment, such as prior authorization or a physician or qualified practitioner’s signature on test requisitions, may be implemented from time to time. Reimbursement for the laboratory services component of our business is also subject to statutory and regulatory reduction. Reductions in the reimbursement rates and changes in payment policies of other third party payers may occur as well. Such changes in the past have resulted in reduced payments as well as added costs and have decreased test utilization for the clinical laboratory industry by adding more complex new regulatory and administrative requirements. As a result, increases in the percentage of services billed to government payers could have an adverse impact on our net sales.

Our laboratories require ongoing CLIA certification.

The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, or CLIA, extended federal oversight to virtually all clinical laboratories by requiring that they be certified by the federal government or by a federally-approved accreditation agency. The CLIA requires that all clinical laboratories meet quality assurance, quality control and personnel standards. Laboratories must also undergo proficiency testing and are subject to inspections.

 

The sanctions for failure to comply with the CLIA requirements include suspension, revocation or limitation of a laboratory’s CLIA certificate, which is necessary to conduct business, cancellation or suspension of the laboratory’s approval to receive Medicare and/or Medicaid reimbursement, as well as significant fines and/or criminal penalties. The loss or suspension of a CLIA certification, imposition of a fine or other penalties, or future changes in the CLIA law or regulations (or interpretation of the law or regulations) could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

We believe that we are in compliance with all applicable laboratory requirements, but no assurances can be given that our laboratories will pass all future certification inspections.

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Failure to comply with HIPAA could be costly.

HIPAA and associated regulations protect the privacy and security of certain patient health information and establish standards for electronic health care transactions in the United States. These privacy regulations establish federal standards regarding the uses and disclosures of protected health information. Our laboratories are subject to HIPAA and its associated regulations. If we fail to comply with these laws and regulations we could suffer civil and criminal penalties, fines, exclusion from participation in governmental health care programs and the loss of various licenses, certificates and authorizations necessary to operate our patient testing business. We could also incur liabilities from third party claims.

Our failure to comply with any applicable government laws and regulations or otherwise respond to claims relating to improper handling, storage or disposal of hazardous chemicals that we use may adversely affect our results of operations.

Our research and development and commercial activities involve the controlled use of hazardous materials and chemicals. We are subject to federal, state, local and international laws and regulations governing the use, storage, handling and disposal of hazardous materials and waste products. If we fail to comply with applicable laws or regulations, we could be required to pay penalties or be held liable for any damages that result and this liability could exceed our financial resources. We cannot be certain that accidental contamination or injury will not occur. Any such accident could damage our research and manufacturing facilities and operations, resulting in delays and increased costs.

We may become subject to the Anti-Kickback Statute, Stark Law, False Claims Act, Civil Monetary Penalties Law and may be subject to analogous provisions of applicable state laws and could face substantial penalties if we fail to comply with such laws.

There are several federal laws addressing fraud and abuse that apply to businesses that receive reimbursement from a federal health care program. There are also a number of similar state laws covering fraud and abuse with respect to, for example, private payers, self-pay and insurance. Currently, we receive a substantial percentage of our revenue from private payers and from Medicare. Accordingly, our business is subject to federal fraud and abuse laws, such as the Anti-Kickback Statute, the Stark Law, the False Claims Act, the Civil Monetary Penalties Law and other similar laws. Moreover, we are already subject to similar state laws. We believe we have operated, and intend to continue to operate, our business in compliance with these laws. However, these laws are subject to modification and changes in interpretation, and are enforced by authorities vested with broad discretion. Federal and state enforcement entities have significantly increased their scrutiny of healthcare companies and providers which has led to investigations, prosecutions, convictions and large settlements. We continually monitor developments in this area. If these laws are interpreted in a manner contrary to our interpretation or are reinterpreted or amended, or if new legislation is enacted with respect to healthcare fraud and abuse, illegal remuneration, or similar issues, we may be required to restructure our affected operations to maintain compliance with applicable law. There can be no assurances that any such restructuring will be possible or, if possible, would not have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial position, or cash flows.

 

Anti-Kickback Statute

 

A federal law commonly referred to as the “Anti-Kickback Statute” prohibits the knowing and willful offer, payment, solicitation or receipt of remuneration, directly or indirectly, in return for the referral of patients or arranging for the referral of patients, or in return for the recommendation, arrangement, purchase, lease or order of items or services that are covered, in whole or in part, by a federal healthcare program such as Medicare or Medicaid. The term “remuneration” has been broadly interpreted to include anything of value such as gifts, discounts, rebates, waiver of payments or providing anything at less than its fair market value. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act, or the PPACA, amended the intent requirement of the Anti-Kickback Statute such that a person or entity can be found guilty of violating the statute without actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate the statute. Further, the PPACA now provides that claims submitted in violation of the Anti-Kickback Statute constitute false or fraudulent claims for purposes of the federal False Claims Act, or FCA, including the failure to timely return an overpayment. Many states have adopted similar prohibitions against kickbacks

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and other practices that are intended to influence the purchase, lease or ordering of healthcare items and services reimbursed by a governmental health program or state Medicaid program. Some of these state prohibitions apply to remuneration for referrals of healthcare items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including commercial payors and self-pay patients.

 

Stark Law

 

Section 1877 of the Social Security Act, or the Stark Law, prohibits a physician from referring a patient to an entity for certain “designated health services” reimbursable by Medicare if the physician (or close family members) has a financial relationship with that entity, including an ownership or investment interest, a loan or debt relationship or a compensation relationship, unless an exception to the Stark Law is fully satisfied. The designated health services covered by the law include, among others, laboratory and imaging services. Some states have self-referral laws similar to the Stark Law for Medicaid claims and commercial claims.

 

Violation of the Stark Law may result in prohibition of payment for services rendered, a refund of any Medicare payments for services that resulted from an unlawful referral, $15,000 civil monetary penalties for specified infractions, criminal penalties, and potential exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs, and potential false claims liability. The repayment provisions in the Stark Law are not dependent on the parties having an improper intent; rather, the Stark Law is a strict liability statute and any violation is subject to repayment of all amounts arising out of tainted referrals. If physician self-referral laws are interpreted differently or if other legislative restrictions are issued, we could incur significant sanctions and loss of revenues, or we could have to change our arrangements and operations in a way that could have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, damage to our reputation, results of operations and financial condition.

 

False Claims Act

 

The FCA prohibits providers from, among other things, (1) knowingly presenting or causing to be presented, claims for payments from the Medicare, Medicaid or other federal healthcare programs that are false or fraudulent; (2) knowingly making, using or causing to be made or used, a false record or statement to get a false or fraudulent claim paid or approved by the federal government; or (3) knowingly making, using or causing to be made or used, a false record or statement to avoid, decrease or conceal an obligation to pay money to the federal government. The “qui tam” or “whistleblower” provisions of the FCA allow private individuals to bring actions under the FCA on behalf of the government. These private parties are entitled to share in any amounts recovered by the government, and, as a result, the number of “whistleblower” lawsuits that have been filed against providers has increased significantly in recent years. Defendants found to be liable under the FCA may be required to pay three times the actual damages sustained by the government, plus civil penalties ranging between $5,500 and $11,000 for each separate false claim.

 

There are many potential bases for liability under the FCA. The government has used the FCA to prosecute Medicare and other government healthcare program fraud such as coding errors, billing for services not provided, and providing care that is not medically necessary or that is substandard in quality. The PPACA also provides that claims submitted in connection with patient referrals that result from violations of the Anti-Kickback Statute constitute false claims for the purpose of the FCA, and some courts have held that a violation of the Stark law can result in FCA liability, as well. In addition, a number of states have adopted their own false claims and whistleblower provisions whereby a private party may file a civil lawsuit in state court. We are required to provide information to our employees and certain contractors about state and federal false claims laws and whistleblower provisions and protections.

 

Civil Monetary Penalties Law

 

The Civil Monetary Penalties Law prohibits, among other things, the offering or giving of remuneration to a Medicare or Medicaid beneficiary that the person or entity knows or should know is likely to influence the beneficiary’s selection of a particular provider or supplier of items or services reimbursable by a federal or state healthcare program. This broad provision applies to many kinds of inducements or benefits provided to patients, including complimentary items, services or transportation that are of more than a nominal value. This law could affect how we have to structure our operations and activities.

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Intellectual Property Risks Related to Our Business

We cannot be certain that measures taken to protect our intellectual property will be effective.

We rely upon trade secrets, copyright and trademark laws, non-disclosure agreements and other contractual confidentiality provisions to protect our confidential and proprietary information that we are not seeking patent protection for various reasons. Such measures, however, may not provide adequate protection for our trade secrets or other proprietary information. If such measures do not protect our rights, third parties could use our technology and our ability to compete in the market would be reduced.

We depend on certain technologies that are licensed to us. We do not control these technologies and any loss of our rights to them could prevent us from selling some of our products.

 

We have entered into license agreements with third parties for certain licensed technologies that are, or may become, relevant to the products we market, or plan to market, including our license agreement with Dana-Farber pursuant to which we license our ICP technology. In addition, we may in the future elect to license third party intellectual property to further our business objectives and/or as needed for freedom to operate for our products. We do not and will not own the patents, patent applications or other intellectual property rights that are the subject of these licenses. Our rights to use these technologies and employ the inventions claimed in the licensed patents, patent applications and other intellectual property rights are or will be subject to the continuation of and compliance with the terms of those licenses.

 

We might not be able to obtain licenses to technology or other intellectual property rights that we require. Even if such licenses are obtainable, they may not be available at a reasonable cost or multiple licenses may be needed for the same product (e.g., stacked royalties). We could therefore incur substantial costs related to royalty payments for licenses obtained from third parties, which could negatively affect our gross margins. Further, we could encounter delays in product introductions, or interruptions in product sales, as we develop alternative methods or products.

 

In some cases, we do not or may not control the prosecution, maintenance, or filing of the patents or patent applications to which we hold licenses, or the enforcement of these patents against third parties. As a result, we cannot be certain that drafting or prosecution of the licensed patents and patent applications by the licensors have been or will be conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations or will result in valid and enforceable patents and other intellectual property rights. 

 

Third parties may assert ownership or commercial rights to inventions we develop.

 

Third parties may in the future make claims challenging the inventorship or ownership of our intellectual property. For example, third parties that have been introduced to or have benefited from our inventions may attempt to replicate or reverse engineer our products and circumvent ownership of our inventions. In addition, we may face claims that our agreements with employees, contractors, or consultants obligating them to assign intellectual property to us are ineffective, or in conflict with prior or competing contractual obligations of assignment, which could result in ownership disputes regarding intellectual property we have developed or will develop and interfere with our ability to capture the commercial value of such inventions. Litigation may be necessary to resolve an ownership dispute, and if we are not successful, we may be precluded from using certain intellectual property, or may lose our exclusive rights in that intellectual property. Either outcome could have an adverse impact on our business.

 

Third parties may assert that our employees or consultants have wrongfully used or disclosed confidential information or misappropriated trade secrets.

 

Although we try to ensure that our employees and consultants do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that we or our employees, consultants or independent contractors have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed intellectual property, including trade secrets or other proprietary information, of a former employer or other third parties. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable

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intellectual property rights or personnel. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management and other employees.

 

The testing, manufacturing and marketing of medical diagnostic devices entails an inherent risk of product liability and personal injury claims.

 

To date, we have experienced no product liability or personal injury claims, but any such claims arising in the future could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Potential product liability or personal injury claims may exceed the amount of our insurance coverage or may be excluded from coverage under the terms of our policy or limited by other claims under our umbrella insurance policy. Additionally, our existing insurance may not be renewed by us at a cost and level of coverage comparable to that presently in effect, if at all. In the event that we are held liable for a claim against which we are not insured or for damages exceeding the limits of our insurance coverage, such claim could have a material adverse effect on our cash flow and thus potentially a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

All of our diagnostic technology development and our clinical services are performed at two laboratories, and in the event either or both of these facilities were to be affected by a termination of the lease or a man-made or natural disaster, our operations could be severely impaired.

 

We are performing all of our diagnostic services in our CLIA laboratory located in New Haven, Connecticut and our research and development operations are based in our facility in Omaha, Nebraska. Despite precautions taken by us, any future natural or man-made disaster at these laboratories, such as a fire, earthquake or terrorist activity, could cause substantial delays in our operations, damage or destroy our equipment and testing samples or cause us to incur additional expenses.

 

In addition, we are leasing the facilities where our laboratories operate. We are currently in compliance with all and any lease obligations, but should the leases terminate for any reason, or if at any time either of the laboratories is moved due to conditions outside our control, it could cause substantial delay in our diagnostics operations, damage or destroy our equipment and biological samples or cause us to incur additional expenses. In the event of an extended shutdown of either laboratory, we may be unable to perform our services in a timely manner or at all and therefore would be unable to operate in a commercially competitive manner. This could harm our operating results and financial condition.

 

Further, if we have to use a substitute laboratory while our facilities were shut down, we could only use another facility with established state licensure and accreditation under CLIA. We may not be able to find another CLIA-certified facility and comply with applicable procedures, or find any such laboratory that would be willing to perform the tests for us on commercially reasonable terms. Additionally, any new laboratory opened by us would be subject to certification under CLIA and licensure by various states, which would take a significant amount of time and result in delays in our ability to continue our operations.

An impairment in the carrying value of our intangible assets could negatively affect our results of operations.

 

A significant portion of our assets are intangible assets which are reviewed at least annually for impairment. If we do not realize our business plan, our intangible assets may become impaired resulting in an impairment loss in our results of operations.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

The price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly, which could negatively affect us and holders of our common stock.

There has been, and continues to be, a limited public market for our common stock, and an active trading market for our common stock has not and may never develop or, if developed, be sustained. The trading price of our

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common stock may be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations in response to various factors, some of which are beyond our control. These factors include:

These factors include:

·

actual or anticipated fluctuations in  our financial condition and operating results:

·

actual or anticipated changes in our growth rate relative to our competitors;

·

competition from existing products or new products that may emerge;

·

announcements by us, our academic institution partners, or our competitors of significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures, collaborations, or capital commitments;

·

failure to meet or exceed financial estimates and projections of the investment community or that we provide to the public and the revision of any financial estimates and projections that we provide to the public;

·

issuance of new or updated research or reports by securities analysts;

·

fluctuations in the valuation of companies perceived by investors to be comparable to us;

·

share price and volume fluctuations attributable to inconsistent trading volume levels of our shares;

·

additions, transitions or departures of key management or scientific personnel;

·

disputes or other developments related to proprietary rights, including patents, litigation matters, and our ability to obtain patent protection for our technologies;

·

changes to reimbursement levels by commercial third-party payors and government payors, including Medicare, and any announcements relating to reimbursement levels;

·

Government shut-down or partial shut-downs impacting the financial markets, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission and other related agencies;

·

announcement or expectation of additional debt or equity financing efforts;

·

sales of our common stock by us, our insiders, or our other stockholders; and

·

general economic and market conditions

These and other market and industry factors may cause the market price and demand for our common stock to fluctuate substantially, regardless of our actual operating performance, which may limit or prevent investors from readily selling their shares of our common stock and may otherwise negatively affect the liquidity of our common stock. In addition, the stock market in general has experienced price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of these companies. In the past, when the market price of a stock has been volatile, holders of that stock have instituted securities class action litigation against the company that issued the stock. If any of our stockholders brought a lawsuit against us, we could incur substantial costs defending the lawsuit. Such a lawsuit could also divert the time and attention of our management.

 

The price of our stock may be vulnerable to manipulation.

 

We believe our common stock has been the subject of significant short selling by certain market participants. Short sales are transactions in which a market participant sells a security that it does not own. To complete the transaction, the market participant must borrow the security to make delivery to the buyer. The market participant is then obligated to replace the security borrowed by purchasing the security at the market price at the time of required replacement. If the price at the time of replacement is lower than the price at which the security was originally sold by the market participant, then the market participant will realize a gain on the transaction. Thus, it is in the market participant’s interest for the market price of the underlying security to decline as much as possible during the period prior to the time of replacement.

 

Because our unrestricted public float has been small relative to other issuers, previous short selling efforts have impacted, and may in the future continue to impact, the value of our stock in an extreme and volatile manner to our detriment and the detriment of our shareholders. Efforts by certain market participants to manipulate the price of our common stock for their personal financial gain may cause our stockholders to lose a portion of their investment, may make it more difficult for us to raise equity capital when needed without significantly diluting existing stockholders, and may reduce demand from new investors to purchase shares of our stock.

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If we cannot continue to satisfy NASDAQ listing maintenance requirements and other rules, our securities may be delisted, which could negatively impact the price of our securities. 

Although our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market, we may be unable to continue to satisfy the listing maintenance requirements and rules. If we are unable to satisfy The NASDAQ Stock Market, or NASDAQ, criteria for maintaining our listing, our securities could be subject to delisting.

 

On March 26, 2019, we were notified by the Listing Qualifications Staff of The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC that we did not meet the minimum closing bid price requirement of $1 for continued listing, as set forth in Nasdaq Listing Rule 5550(a)(2) (the “Bid Price Requirement”).  On April 25, 2019 we filed a Certificate of Amendment with the Secretary of State of Delaware, pursuant to which we effected a 1-for-15 reverse stock split (the “Reverse Stock Split”) of our issued and outstanding common stock. The Reverse Stock Split became effective as of 5:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on April 26, 2019, and our common stock began trading on a split-adjusted basis on the Nasdaq Capital Market at the market open on April 29, 2019.  On May 15, 2019, we received notification from NASDAQ that the Company’s stock price was in compliance with the Bid Price Requirement, and that the matter is now closed.

 

If NASDAQ delists our securities, we could face significant consequences, including:

·

a limited availability for market quotations for our securities;

·

reduced liquidity with respect to our securities;

·

a determination that our common stock is a “penny stock,” which will require brokers trading in our common stock to adhere to more stringent rules and possibly result in reduced trading;

·

activity in the secondary trading market for our common stock;

·

limited amount of news and analyst coverage; and

·

a decreased ability to issue additional securities or obtain additional financing in the future.

In addition, we would no longer be subject to NASDAQ rules, including rules requiring us to have a certain number of independent directors and to meet other corporate governance standards.

Increased costs associated with corporate governance compliance may significantly impact our results of operations.

As a public company, we incur significant legal, accounting, and other expenses due to our compliance with regulations and disclosure obligations applicable to us, including compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as rules implemented by the SEC, and NASDAQ. The SEC and other regulators have continued to adopt new rules and regulations and make additional changes to existing regulations that require our compliance. In July 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or the Dodd-Frank Act, was enacted. There are significant corporate governance and executive compensation related provisions in the Dodd-Frank Act that have required the SEC to adopt additional rules and regulations in these areas. Stockholder activism, the current political environment, and the current high level of government intervention and regulatory reform may lead to substantial new regulations and disclosure obligations, which may lead to additional compliance costs and impact, in ways we cannot currently anticipate, the manner in which we operate our business. Our management and other personnel devote a substantial amount of time to these compliance programs and monitoring of public company reporting obligations, and as a result of the new corporate governance and executive compensation related rules, regulations, and guidelines prompted by the Dodd-Frank Act, and further regulations and disclosure obligations expected in the future, we will likely need to devote additional time and costs to comply with such compliance programs and rules. These rules and regulations will cause us to incur significant legal and financial compliance costs and will make some activities more time-consuming and costly.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires that we maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting. We are continuing to develop and refine our disclosure controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file with the SEC is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms, and that information required to be disclosed in reports under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our principal executive and financial officers. Our current controls and any new controls that we develop may become

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inadequate, and weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting may be discovered in the future. Any failure to develop or maintain effective controls could adversely affect the results of periodic management evaluations and annual independent registered public accounting firm attestation reports regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, which we may be required to include in our periodic reports that we file with the SEC under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and could harm our operating results, cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations, or result in a restatement of our prior period financial statements. If we are not able to demonstrate compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, that our internal control over financial reporting is perceived as inadequate, or that we are unable to produce timely or accurate financial statements, investors may lose confidence in our operating results, and the price of our common stock could decline.

 

We are required to comply with certain of the SEC rules that implement Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which requires management to certify financial and other information in our quarterly and annual reports and provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. This assessment needs to include the disclosure of any material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting identified by our management or our independent registered public accounting firm. During the evaluation and testing process, if we identify one or more material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting or if we are unable to complete our evaluation, testing, and any required remediation in a timely fashion, we will be unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective.

 

These developments could make it more difficult for us to retain qualified members of our Board of Directors, or qualified executive officers. We are presently evaluating and monitoring regulatory developments and cannot estimate the timing or magnitude of additional costs we may incur as a result. To the extent these costs are significant, our general and administrative expenses are likely to increase.

We have not paid dividends on our common stock in the past and do not expect to pay dividends on our common stock for the foreseeable future. Any return on investment may be limited to the value of our common stock.

No cash dividends have been paid on our common stock.  We expect that any income received from operations will be devoted to our future operations and growth.  We do not expect to pay cash dividends on our common stock in the near future.  Payment of dividends would depend upon our profitability at the time, cash available for those dividends, and other factors as our board of directors may consider relevant.  If we do not pay dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on an investor’s investment will only occur if our stock price appreciates.  Investors in our common stock should not rely on an investment in our company if they require dividend income.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they change their recommendations regarding our stock adversely, our stock price and trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our common stock relies in part on the research and reports that equity research analysts publish about us and our business. We do not control these analysts. The price of our common stock could decline if one or more equity research analysts downgrade our common stock or if they issue other unfavorable commentary or cease publishing reports about us or our business.

The sale or issuance of our common stock to Lincoln Park may cause significant dilution and the sale of the shares of common stock acquired by Lincoln Park, or the perception that such sales may occur, could cause the price of our common stock to fall. 

 

On September 7, 2018, we entered into the LP Purchase Agreement pursuant to which Lincoln Park has agreed to purchase up to an aggregate of $10,000,000 of our common stock (subject to certain limitations) from time to time over the term of the LP Purchase Agreement.

 

On December 20, 2018 we obtained shareholder approval of the $10,000,000 Lincoln Park Purchase Agreement. Per the terms of the LP Purchase Agreement, we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase up to $10,000,000 worth of shares of our common stock under our agreement over a 24-month period

 

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The extent we rely on Lincoln Park as a source of funding will depend on a number of factors including, the prevailing market price of our common stock and the extent to which we are able to secure working capital from other sources. The purchase price for the shares that we may sell to Lincoln Park under the Purchase Agreement will fluctuate based on the price of our common stock. Depending on market liquidity at the time, sales of such shares may cause the trading price of our common stock to fall. We generally have the right to control the timing and amount of any future sales of our shares to Lincoln Park. Additional sales of our common stock, if any, to Lincoln Park will depend upon market conditions and other factors to be determined by us. We may ultimately decide to sell to Lincoln Park all, some or none of the additional shares of our common stock that may be available for us to sell pursuant to the Purchase Agreement. If and when we do sell shares to Lincoln Park, after Lincoln Park has acquired the shares, Lincoln Park may resell all, some or none of those shares at any time or from time to time in its discretion. Therefore, sales to Lincoln Park by us could result in substantial dilution to the interests of other holders of our common stock. Additionally, the sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock to Lincoln Park, or the anticipation of such sales, could make it more difficult for us to sell equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and at a price that we might otherwise wish to effect sales.

 

As of the date the consolidated financial statements were issued, we have already received an aggregate of $9.3 million, including approximately $1.4 million from the sale of 328,590 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park during 2018, $6.6 million from the sale of 2,778,077 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park during 2019, and $1.3 million from the sale of 900,012 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park from January 1, 2020 through the date the consolidated financial statements were issued.

 

The issuance of our common stock to creditors or litigants may cause significant dilution to our stockholders and cause the price of our common stock to fall

 

We may seek to settle outstanding obligations to vendors, debtholders or litigants in any litigation through the issuance of our common stock or other security to such persons. Such issuances may cause significant dilution to our stockholders and cause the price of our common stock to fall.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

Item 2. Properties

We currently lease approximately 7,630 square feet of laboratory and office space in New Haven, Connecticut, which we occupy under a lease expiring in December 2021 with annual rental payments of $0.2 million. We also lease approximately 5,300 square feet of laboratory space in Omaha, Nebraska, which we occupy under a lease expiring in May 2022 with annual rental payments of less than $0.1 million. We believe that these facilities are adequate to meet our current and planned needs.  We believe that if additional space is needed in the future, we could find alternate space at competitive market rates as needed.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings    

The healthcare industry is subject to numerous laws and regulations of federal, state and local governments. These laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, matters such as licensure, accreditation, government healthcare program participation requirement, reimbursement for patient services and Medicare and Medicaid fraud and abuse. Government activity has increased with respect to investigations and allegations concerning possible violations of fraud and abuse statutes and regulations by healthcare providers.

Violations of these laws and regulations could result in expulsion from government healthcare programs together with the imposition of significant fines and penalties, as well as significant repayments for patient services previously billed. Management believes that the Company is in compliance with fraud and abuse regulations, as well as other applicable government laws and regulations. While no material regulatory inquiries have been made, compliance

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with such laws and regulations can be subject to future government review and interpretation, as well as regulatory actions unknown or unasserted at this time.

The outcome of legal proceedings and claims brought against us are subject to significant uncertainty. Therefore, although management considers the likelihood of such an outcome to be remote, if one or more of these legal matters were resolved against us in the same reporting period for amounts in excess of management’s expectations, our financial statements for such reporting period could be materially adversely affected. In general, the resolution of a legal matter could prevent us from offering our services or products to others, could be material to our financial condition or cash flows, or both, or could otherwise adversely affect our operating results.

The Company is delinquent on the payment of outstanding accounts payable for certain vendors and suppliers who have taken or have threatened to take legal action to collect such outstanding amounts.

On February 21, 2017, XIFIN, Inc. (“XIFIN”) filed a lawsuit against us in the District Court for the Southern District of California alleging breach of written contract and seeking recovery of approximately $0.27 million owed by us to XIFIN for damages arising from a breach of our obligations pursuant to a Systems Services Agreement between us and XIFIN, dated as of February 22, 2013, as amended and restated on September 1, 2014. A liability of $0.1 million was reflected in accounts payable within the accompanying consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2018. On April 19, 2019, the Company executed a settlement agreement with XIFIN pursuant to which the Company paid to XIFIN an agreed amount of $40,000 as settlement in consideration for total release from all outstanding amounts due and payable by the Company to XIFIN. The settlement amount was paid in full by the Company on April 19, 2019.

CPA Global provides us with certain patent management services. On February 6, 2017, CPA Global claimed that we owe approximately $0.2 million for certain patent maintenance services rendered. CPA Global has not filed claims against us in connection with this allegation.  A liability of less than $0.1 million has been recorded and is reflected in accounts payable within the accompanying consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2019 and 2018.

On February 17, 2017, Jesse Campbell (“Campbell”) filed a lawsuit individually and on behalf of others similarly situated against us in the District Court for the District of Nebraska alleging we had a materially incomplete and misleading proxy relating to a potential merger and that the merger agreement’s deal protection provisions deter superior offers. As a result, Campbell alleges that we have violated Sections 14(a) and 20(a) of the Exchange Act and Rule 14a‑9 promulgated thereafter. The Company filed a motion to dismiss all claims, which motion was fully briefed on November 27, 2017. The Court granted the Company’s motion in full on May 3, 2018 and dismissed the lawsuit. The Eighth Circuit reversed the decision of the District Court and remanded the case back to the District Court. The parties filed a notice with the Court on May 22, 2019, announcing that they had reached a settlement in principle.  On June 21, 2019, the parties filed a stipulation of settlement, in which defendants are released from all claims and expressly deny that that they have committed any act or omission giving rise to any liability.  The stipulation includes a settlement payment of $1.95 million, which will be primarily funded by our insurance.  On July 10, 2019, the Court entered an order preliminarily approving the settlement.  The settlement remains subject to final approval by the Court. The Company’s insurance policy includes a deductible of approximately $0.8 million and the Company has previously paid approximately $0.5 million in legal fees in connection with the litigation which have been applied to the deductible leaving approximately $0.3 million to be paid by the Company and approximately $1.7 million to be paid by the insurance company. During the third quarter of 2019, both the Company and the insurance company paid their respective amounts to an escrow account where the funds will be held until they are approved for distribution at a fairness hearing of the Court which took place on November 4, 2019. As of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the Company is waiting for the Court to render its judgement which is still outstanding.

On March 21, 2018, Bio-Rad Laboratories filed a lawsuit against us in the Superior Court Judicial Branch of the State of Connecticut for Summary Judgment in Lieu of Complaint requiring us to pay cash owed to Bio-Rad in the amount of $39,000 that was recorded in accounts payable within the accompanying consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2018.  The obligation was paid in full during the second quarter 2019, resulting in no remaining amount due to Bio-Rad.

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Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not Applicable.

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information. Since June 30, 2017, the trading date following the consummation of the Merger, our common stock has traded on the NASDAQ Capital Market under the symbol “PRPO.”

The following table sets forth the high and low closing prices for our common stock during each of the quarters of 2019 and 2018 as reported on the market exchange noted above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

High

    

Low

Quarter Ended March 31, 2020

 

 

  

 

 

  

First Quarter (through March 25, 2020)

 

$

2.29

 

$

0.68

Year Ended December 31, 2019

 

 

  

 

 

  

First Quarter

 

$

3.90

 

$

1.83

Second Quarter

 

$

9.15

 

$

1.89

Third Quarter

 

$

4.08

 

$

2.18

Fourth Quarter

 

$

2.60

 

$

1.81

Year Ended December 31, 2018

 

 

  

 

 

  

First Quarter

 

$

19.50

 

$

7.15

Second Quarter

 

$

8.19

 

$

5.43

Third Quarter

 

$

7.58

 

$

4.92

Fourth Quarter

 

$

6.03

 

$

2.25

 

Performance Graph.   We are a smaller reporting company, as defined by Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act, and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

Holders.   At March 25, 2020, there were 8,870,129 shares of our common stock outstanding and approximately 57 holders of record.

Dividends. No cash dividends have been paid on our common stock. We expect that any income received from operations will be devoted to our future operations and growth. We do not expect to pay cash dividends on our common stock in the near future. Payment of dividends would depend upon our profitability at the time, cash available for those dividends, and other factors as our board of directors may consider relevant. If we do not pay dividends, our common stock may be less valuable because a return on an investor’s investment will only occur if our stock price appreciates. Investors in our common stock should not rely on an investment in our company if they require dividend income.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.  We made no purchases of our common stock during the year ended December 31, 2019. Therefore, tabular disclosure is not presented.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities.  Not applicable.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

We are a smaller reporting company, as defined by Rule 12b‑2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Forward-Looking Information

This Annual Report on Form 10‑K, including this Management’s Discussion and Analysis, contains forward-looking statements. These statements are based on management’s current views, assumptions or beliefs of future events and financial performance and are subject to uncertainty and changes in circumstances. Readers of this report should understand that these statements are not guarantees of performance or results.  Many factors could affect our actual financial results and cause them to vary materially from the expectations contained in the forward-looking statements. These factors include, among other things: our expected revenue, income (loss), receivables, operating expenses, supplier pricing, availability and prices of raw materials, insurance reimbursements, product pricing, sources of funding operations and acquisitions, our ability to raise funds, sufficiency of available liquidity, future interest costs, future economic circumstances, business strategy, industry conditions, our ability to execute our operating plans, the success of our cost savings initiatives, competitive environment and related market conditions, expected financial and other benefits from our organizational restructuring activities, actions of governments and regulatory factors affecting our business, retaining key employees and other risks as described in our reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In some cases these statements are identifiable through the use of words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “project,” “target,” “can,” “could,” “may,” “should,” “will,” “would” or the negative versions of these terms and other similar expressions.

You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements we make are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to various assumptions, risks and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those suggested by these forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially from those suggested by the forward-looking statements that we make for a number of reasons, including those described in Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors,” of this Annual Report on Form 10‑K.

We expressly disclaim any obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

Overview

We are a cancer diagnostics company providing diagnostic products and services to the oncology market. We have built and continue to develop a platform designed to eradicate the problem of misdiagnosis by harnessing the intellect, expertise and technologies developed within academic institutions, and delivering quality diagnostic information to physicians and their patients worldwide. We operate a cancer diagnostic laboratory located in New Haven, Connecticut and have partnered with various academic institutions to capture the expertise, experience and technologies developed within academia to provide a better standard of cancer diagnostics and aim to solve the growing problem of cancer misdiagnosis. We also operate a research and development facility in Omaha, Nebraska which focuses on development of various technologies, among them IV-Cell, HemeScreen and ICE-COLD-PCR, or ICP, the patented technology described further below, which we exclusively licensed from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc., or Dana-Farber, at Harvard University. The research and development center focuses on the development of these technologies, which we believe will enable us to commercialize these and other technologies developed with our current and future academic partners. The facility in Omaha was also recently certified as a CLIA and CAP facility, and we have begun bringing in house several molecular tests that the Company had previously referenced out to other laboratories. Our platform also connects patients, physicians and diagnostic experts residing within academic institutions.

The following discussion should be read together with our financial statements and related notes contained in this Annual Report.  Results for the year ended December 31, 2019 are not necessarily indicative of results that may be attained in the future.

Recent Developments

On March 16, 2020, the Company announced that it had completed a non-cash transaction with Poplar Healthcare to establish a strategic partnership that includes the acquisition of the customer base OncoMetrix, Poplar’s

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hematopathology division. Precipio will assume responsibility for OncoMetrix’s customer base and associated revenues which should provide a substantial improvement to the Company’s laboratory economies of scale. As part of the transaction, three sales representatives of OncoMetrix have transitioned to Precipio. The transition of the customer base involved no exchange of cash or equity with Poplar Healthcare.  

 

Going Concern

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) applicable for a going concern, which assume that the Company will realize its assets and discharge its liabilities in the ordinary course of business. The Company has incurred substantial operating losses and has used cash in its operating activities for the past several years. As of December 31, 2019, the Company had a net loss of $13.2 million, negative working capital of $2.5 million and net cash used in operating activities of $9.1 million. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern over the next twelve months from the date the consolidated financial statements were issued is dependent upon a combination of achieving its business plan, including generating additional revenue, and raising additional financing to meet its debt obligations and paying liabilities arising from normal business operations when they come due.

To meet its current and future obligations the Company has entered into a purchase agreement with Lincoln Park (the “LP Purchase Agreement” or “Equity Line”), pursuant to which Lincoln Park has agreed to purchase from the Company up to an aggregate of $10.0 million of common stock of the Company (subject to certain limitations) from time to time over the term of the LP Purchase Agreement. The extent we rely on Lincoln Park as a source of funding will depend on a number of factors including, the prevailing market price of our common stock and the extent to which we are able to secure working capital from other sources. As of the date the consolidated financial statements were issued, we have already received approximately $9.3 million in aggregate, including approximately $1.4 million from the sale of 328,590 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park during 2018, $6.6 million from the sale of 2,778,077 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park during 2019 and $1.3 million from the sale of 900,012 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park from January 1, 2020 through the date the consolidated financial statements were issued, leaving the company an additional $0.7 million to draw upon.

 

Notwithstanding the aforementioned circumstances, there remains substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for the next twelve months from the date the consolidated financial statements were issued.  There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to successfully achieve its initiatives summarized above in order to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern and do not include any adjustments that might result should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern as a result of the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

Net Sales. Net sales were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dollars in Thousands

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 

 

Change

 

 

    

2019

    

2018

    

$

    

%

 

Service revenue, net, less allowance for doubtful accounts

 

$

3,083

 

$

2,751

 

$

332

 

12

%

Clinical research grants

 

 

 —

 

 

100

 

 

(100)

 

(100)

%

Other

 

 

44

 

 

13

 

 

31

 

238

%

Net Sales

 

$

3,127

 

$

2,864

 

$

263

 

 9

%

 

Net sales for the year ended December 31, 2019 were $3.1 million, an increase of $0.3 million, or 9%, as compared to the same period in 2018.  During the year ended December 31, 2019, patient diagnostic service revenue had an increase of $0.9 million as compared to the same period in 2018 due to an increase in cases processed. We billed 1,672 cases during the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to 1,345 cases during the same period in 2018, or a 24% increase in cases. The increase in volume is the result of increased sales personnel.  This increase was offset by a

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decrease of $0.5 million in contract diagnostic service revenue and a decrease of $0.1 million in clinical research grants and other revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to 2018.

Cost of Sales. Cost of sales includes material and supply costs for the patient tests performed and other direct costs (primarily personnel costs and rent) associated with the operations of our laboratory and the costs of projects related to clinical research grants (personnel costs and operating supplies). Cost of sales increased by $0.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to the same period in 2018.  The increase included an increase in patient diagnostic costs offset by a decrease in contract diagnostic and clinical grant costs which are in line with the changes in related revenues discussed above.

Gross Profit. Gross profit and gross margins were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Dollars in Thousands

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 

 

Margin %

 

 

    

2019

    

2018

    

2019

    

2018

 

Gross Profit

 

$

219

 

$

225

 

 7

%  

 8

%

 

Gross margin was 7% of total net sales, for the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to 8% of total net sales for the same period in 2018 and the gross profit was approximately $0.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

Operating Expenses. Operating expenses primarily consist of personnel costs, professional fees, travel costs, facility costs and depreciation and amortization, including any goodwill or intangible asset impairment.  Our operating expenses decreased by $2.9 million to $11.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to $14.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. This decrease is the result of a decrease in goodwill and intangible asset impairment of $3.1 million, a decrease in legal and other professional fees of $1.0 million and a decrease in amortization of acquired intangibles of $0.1 million. The decreases were partially offset by a $0.7 million increase  in sales and marketing costs, which is primarily increased personnel costs related to our increase in patient diagnostic service revenues, an increase of $0.2 million in stock compensation costs and an increase of $0.2 million in other general and administrative costs.

 Other Income (Expense). Other expense, net was $2.3 million and $2.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and included interest expense of $0.5 million and $0.3 million, respectively, income from warrant revaluations of $0.4 million and $1.9 million, respectively, derivative revaluations expense of $0.4 million and income of $0.3 million, respectively, a loss on modification of warrants $1.1 million and zero, respectively and a loss on litigation of $0.3 million and zero respectively. Additionally, the Company had a loss on issuance of convertible notes of $1.9 million and $1.3 million, respectively, gains on settlements of liabilities of $1.4 million and $0.3 million, respectively, and a loss on extinguishment of debt of less than $0.1 million and a gain from extinguishment of debt of $0.4 million, respectively.

During the year ended December 31 2018, other expense also included a loss on extinguishment of convertible notes of $2.9 million and a loss on settlement of equity instruments of $0.4 million.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

The consolidated financial statements have been prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) applicable for a going concern, which assume that we will realize our assets and discharge our liabilities in the ordinary course of business. We have incurred substantial operating losses and have used cash in our operating activities for the past several years. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we had a net loss of $13.2 million and negative working capital of $2.5 million. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon a combination of achieving our business plan, including generating additional revenue, and raising additional financing to meet our debt obligations and paying liabilities arising from normal business operations when they come due.

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Our working capital positions at December 31, 2019 and 2018 were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dollars in Thousands

 

    

December 31, 2019

    

December 31, 2018

    

Change

Current assets (including cash of $848 and $381 respectively)

 

$

1,878

 

$

1,793

 

$

85

Current liabilities

 

 

4,334

 

 

13,765

 

 

(9,431)

Working capital

 

$

(2,456)

 

$

(11,972)

 

$

9,516

During the year ended December 31, 2019 we received gross proceeds of $6.6 million from sale of 2,778,077 shares of our common stock, $1.6 million from the exercise of 310,200 warrants and $2.1 million from the issuance of convertible notes. We also converted $7.6 million of convertible notes, including interest, into 2,511,173 shares of our common stock.

Notwithstanding the aforementioned circumstances, there remains substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for the next twelve months from the date the consolidated financial statements were issued.  There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully achieve our initiatives summarized above in order to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming we will continue as a going concern and do not include any adjustments that might result should we be unable to continue as a going concern as a result of the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Analysis of Cash Flows - Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

Net Change in Cash. Cash increased by $0.5 million during the year ended December 31, 2019, compared to a decrease of less than $0.1 million during the year ended December 31, 2018.

Cash Flows Used in Operating Activities. The cash flows used in operating activities of $9.1 million during the year ended December 31, 2019 included a net loss of $13.2 million, an increase in accounts receivable of $0.8 million, a decrease in accounts payable of $1.9 million and a decrease in operating lease liabilities of $0.2 million. These were partially offset by a decrease in other assets of $0.4 million and non-cash adjustments of $6.6 million. The non-cash adjustments to net loss include, among other things, depreciation and amortization, changes in provision for losses on doubtful accounts, warrant and derivative revaluations, stock based compensation, gains on settlements of liabilities, impairment of intangible assets and losses on the issuance of convertible notes.   The cash flows used in operating activities in the year ended December 31, 2018 included  net loss of $15.7 million, an increase in accounts receivable of $0.5 million and an increase in inventories of less than $0.1 million. These were partially offset a decrease in other assets of $0.1 million, an increase in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities of $0.6 million and by non-cash adjustments of $8.8 million. The non-cash adjustments to net loss include, among other things, depreciation and amortization, impairment of goodwill, changes in provision for losses on doubtful accounts, warrant and derivative revaluations, stock based compensation, and gains or losses on settlements of liabilities or debt and extinguishments of debt and convertible notes.

Cash Flows Used In Investing Activities. Cash flows used in investing activities were $0.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, resulting from purchases of property and equipment.

Cash Flows Provided by Financing Activities. Cash flows provided by financing activities totaled $9.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019,  which included proceeds of $6.6 million from the issuance of common stock, $1.6 million from the exercise of warrants and $2.1 million from the issuance of convertible notes. These proceeds were partially offset by payments on our long-term debt and convertible notes of $0.5 million and payments for our finance lease obligations and deferred financing costs of approximately $0.1 million. Cash flows provided by financing activities totaled $6.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2018, which included proceeds of $2.0 million from the issuance of common stock, $0.3 million from the issuance of long-term debt, $3.8 million from the issuance of convertible notes and $1.3 million from the exercise of warrants. These proceeds were partially offset by payments on our long-term debt of $0.4 million and payments for our capital lease obligations and deferred financing costs of $0.2 million.

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

At each of December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

At December 31, 2019, our contractual obligations and other commitments were as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

Payments Due By Period

(in thousands)

 

Total

    

Less Than 1 Year

    

1-3 Years

    

3-5 Years

    

More than 5 Years

Long term debt and convertible notes(1)

 

$

2,676

 

$

2,431

 

$

70

 

$

70

 

$

105

Finance lease obligations(2)

 

 

200

 

 

62

 

 

70

 

 

55

 

 

13

Operating lease obligations(2)

 

 

583

 

 

242

 

 

289

 

 

52

 

 

 —

Purchase obligations(3)

 

 

1,229

 

 

341

 

 

470

 

 

368

 

 

50

 

 

$

4,688

 

$

3,076

 

$

899

 

$

545

 

$

168


(1)

See Note 5 - "Long-Term Debt" and Note  6 – “Convertible Notes” to our accompanying consolidated financial statements included with this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

(2)

See Note 8 -  "Leases" to our accompanying consolidated financial statements included with this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

(3)

These amounts represent purchase commitments, including all open purchase orders.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations are based upon the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The Company’s significant accounting policies are more fully described in Note 2 of the notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included with this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Certain accounting estimates are particularly important to the understanding of the Company’s financial position and results of operations and require the application of significant judgment by the Company’s management and can be materially affected by changes from period to period in economic factors or conditions that are outside the control of management. The Company’s management uses its judgment to determine the appropriate assumptions to be used in the determination of certain estimates. Those estimates are based on historical operations, future business plans and projected financial results, the terms of existing contracts, the observance of trends in the industry, information provided by customers and information available from other outside sources, as appropriate. The following discusses the Company’s critical accounting policies and estimates:

Revenue Recognition

The Company derives its revenues from diagnostic testing - histology, flow cytometry, cytology and molecular testing; clinical research from bio-pharma customers, state and federal grant programs; and from biomarker testing from bio-pharma customers.

Service revenues are comprised of patient diagnostic services for cancer as well as contract diagnostic services for pharmacogenomics trials.   Service revenue is recognized upon completion of the testing process and when the diagnostic result is delivered to the ordering physician and/or customer.  Net patient service revenue is reported at the estimated net realizable amounts from patients, third-party payers and others for services rendered, including retroactive adjustment under reimbursement agreements with third-party payers. Revenue under third-party payer agreements is

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subject to audit and retroactive adjustment. Provisions for third-party payer settlements are provided in the period in which the related services are rendered and adjusted in the future periods, as final settlements are determined.

Revenue from clinical research grant is recognized over time as the service is being performed using a proportional performance method. The Company uses an "efforts based" method of assessing performance. If the arrangement requires the performance of a specified number of similar acts (i.e. test), then revenue is recognized in equal amounts as each act is completed.

Other revenues are comprised of the Company’s ICP technology kits sales to bio-pharma customers and contracted project based technology evaluations.

For the year ended December 31, 2019, service revenue represented 99% of our consolidated revenues and other revenues represented 1%.    There was no revenue attributable to clinical grants during 2019. For the year ended December 31, 2018,  service revenue represented 96% of our consolidated revenues, the revenue attributable to clinical grants represented 3%  and other revenues represented 1%.

Allowance for Contractual Discounts

We are reimbursed by payers for services we provide. Payments for services covered by payers average less than billed charges. We monitor revenue and receivables from payers and record an estimated contractual allowance for certain revenue and receivable balances as of the revenue recognition date to properly account for anticipated differences between amounts estimated in our billing system and amounts ultimately reimbursed by payers. Accordingly, the total revenue and receivables reported in our financial statements are recorded at the amounts expected to be received from these payers. For service revenue, the contractual allowance is estimated based on several criteria, including unbilled claims, historical trends based on actual claims paid, current contract and reimbursement terms and changes in customer base and payer/product mix. The billing functions for the remaining portion of our revenue are contracted and fixed fees for specific services and are recorded without an allowance for contractual discounts.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

The allowance for doubtful accounts is based on estimates of losses related to receivable balances. The risk of collection varies based upon the service, the payer (commercial health insurance and government) and the patient’s ability to pay the amounts not reimbursed by the payer. We estimate the allowance for doubtful accounts based upon several factors including the age of the outstanding receivables, the historical experience of collections, adjusting for current economic conditions and, in some cases, evaluating specific customer accounts for the ability to pay. Collection agencies are employed and legal action is taken when we determine that taking collection actions is reasonable relative to the probability of receiving payment on amounts owed. Management judgment is used to assess the collectability of accounts and the ability of our customers to pay. Judgment is also used to assess trends in collections and the effects of systems and business process changes on our expected collection rates. We review the estimation process quarterly and make changes to the estimates as necessary. When it is determined that a customer account is uncollectible, that balance is written off against the existing allowance.

Accounts Receivable

Accounts Receivable results from diagnostic services provided to self-pay and insured patients, project based testing services and clinical research.  The services provided by the Company are generally due within 30 days from the invoice date.  Accounts receivable are reduced by an allowance for doubtful accounts. In evaluating the collectability of accounts receivable, the Company analyzes and identifies trends for each of its sources of revenue to estimate the appropriate allowance for doubtful accounts. For receivables associated with self-pay patients, including patients with insurance and a deductible and copayment, the Company records an allowance for doubtful accounts in the period of services on the basis of past experience of patients unable or unwilling to pay for service fee for which they are financially responsible. For receivables associated with services provided to patients with third-party coverage, the Company analyzes contractually due amounts and provides an allowance, if necessary. The difference between the standard rates and the amounts actually collected after all reasonable collection efforts have been exhausted is charged

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against the allowance for doubtful accounts.  Service revenues account for all reported accounts receivable as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.

Stock-Based Compensation

Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date, based on the estimated fair value of the award, and is recognized as expense over the grantee’s requisite vesting period on a straight-line basis. For the purpose of valuing stock options granted to our employees, directors and officers, we use the Black-Scholes option pricing model. We granted options to purchase an aggregate of 292,604 and 224,365 shares of common stock during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. To determine the risk-free interest rate, we utilized the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of the grant with a term consistent with the expected term of our awards. The expected term of the options granted is in accordance with Staff Accounting Bulletins 107 and 110, and is based on the average between vesting terms and contractual terms. The expected dividend yield reflects our current and expected future policy for dividends on our common stock. The expected stock price volatility for our stock options was calculated by examining the trading history for our common stock. We will continue to analyze the expected stock price volatility and expected term assumptions and will adjust our Black-Scholes option pricing assumptions as appropriate

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and Goodwill

We assess the recoverability of our long-lived assets, which include property and equipment and definite-lived intangible assets, whenever significant events or changes in circumstances indicate impairment may have occurred. If indicators of impairment exist, projected future undiscounted cash flows associated with the asset are compared to our carrying amount to determine whether the asset’s value is recoverable. Any resulting impairment is recorded as a reduction in the carrying value of the related asset in excess of fair value and a charge to operating results. We did not recognize any impairment charges related to definite-lived intangible assets for the years ending December 31, 2019 and 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2019, we recorded impairment of $1.6 million related to in-process research and development which had been accounted for as an indefinite-lived intangible asset.

Goodwill is not amortized, but is assessed for impairment on an annual basis or more frequently if impairment indicators exist. We have the option to perform a qualitative assessment of goodwill to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of its reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, including goodwill and other intangible assets. If we were to conclude that this is the case, then we must perform a goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of the reporting unit to its carrying value. An impairment charge is recorded to the extent the reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, with the impairment loss recognized not to exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. For the year ended December 31, 2018, goodwill impairment charges were $4.7 million, resulting in no goodwill outstanding at December 31, 2019 and 2018.

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016‑02, Leases-Topic 842. The new standard amends the recognition of lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases currently classified as operating leases and amends disclosure requirements associated with leasing arrangements. The new standard was adopted, effective January 1, 2019, using a modified retrospective transition, and thus did not adjust comparative periods. The new standard provides a number of optional practical expedients in transition.  The Company has elected the “package of practical expedients”, which permits it not to reassess under the new standard its prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification and initial direct costs.  The Company did not elect the use-of-hindsight practical expedient. As a result of the adoption of Topic 842 the Company recognized approximately $0.7 million of lease liabilities and corresponding right-of-use (“ROU”) assets in its consolidated balance sheet on the date of initial application. See Note 8 – Leases for additional information, included with this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07 “Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718)”, which expands the scope of Topic 718 to include share based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from non-employees. The Company adopted this guidance on January 1, 2019. The adoption of this guidance was not material to our consolidated financial statements.

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Recently Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13 “Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments”, which replaces current methods for evaluating impairment of financial instruments not measured at fair value, including trade accounts receivable and certain debt securities, with a current expected credit loss model. This ASU is effective for the Company for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2022. We are currently assessing the potential impact that the adoption of this ASU will have on our consolidated financial statements

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15 “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal Use Software (Subtopic 350-40)”, which aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a cloud computing hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal use software. This ASU is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. We are currently assessing the potential impact that the adoption of this ASU will have on our consolidated financial statements.

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13 “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820)”, which modifies certain disclosure requirements in Topic 820, such as the removal of the need to disclose the amount of and reason for transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy, and several changes related to Level 3 fair value measurements. This ASU is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019. We are currently assessing the potential impact that the adoption of this ASU will have on our consolidated financial statements.

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12 “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes”, which is intended to improve consistent application and simplify the accounting for income taxes. This ASU removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and clarifies and amends existing guidance. This standard is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim reporting periods within those annual reporting periods, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adoption of this ASU and does not expect the adoption of this new standard to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

Impact of Inflation

We do not believe that price inflation or deflation had a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations during the periods presented.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure about Market Risk

We are a smaller reporting company, as defined by Rule 12b‑2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Stockholders and Board of Directors of

Precipio, Inc.

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Precipio, Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Explanatory Paragraph – Going Concern

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As more fully described in Note 1, the Company has a significant working capital deficiency, has incurred significant losses and needs to raise additional funds to meet its obligations and sustain its operations. These conditions raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 1. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

Adoption of New Accounting Standards

 

As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has changed its method of accounting for leases in 2019 due to the adoption of ASU No. 2016-12, Leases (Topic 842), as amended, effective January 1, 2019, using the modified retrospective approach.

Basis for Opinion

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

/s/ Marcum LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2016.

Hartford, CT

March 27, 2020

38

PRECIPIO, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

(Dollars in thousands, except share data)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

2019

    

2018

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash

 

$

848

 

$

381

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

574

 

 

690

Inventories

 

 

184

 

 

197

Other current assets

 

 

272

 

 

525

Total current assets

 

 

1,878

 

 

1,793

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, NET

 

 

431

 

 

496

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating lease right-of-use assets

 

 

519

 

 

 —

Intangibles, net

 

 

16,658

 

 

19,291

Other assets

 

 

25

 

 

25

Total assets

 

$

19,511

 

$

21,605

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current maturities of long-term debt, less debt issuance costs

 

$

321

 

$

263

Current maturities of convertible notes, less debt discounts and debt issuance costs

 

 

142

 

 

4,377

Current maturities of finance lease liabilities

 

 

52

 

 

57

Current maturities of operating lease liabilities

 

 

209

 

 

 —

Accounts payable

 

 

1,936

 

 

5,169

Accrued expenses

 

 

1,639

 

 

1,940

Deferred revenue

 

 

35

 

 

49

Other current liabilities

 

 

 —

 

 

1,910

Total current liabilities

 

 

4,334

 

 

13,765

LONG TERM LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt, less current maturities and debt issuance costs

 

 

198

 

 

253

Finance lease liabilities, less current maturities

 

 

119

 

 

155

Operating lease liabilities, less current maturities

 

 

317

 

 

 —

Common stock warrant liabilities

 

 

1,338

 

 

1,132

Derivative liabilities

 

 

 —

 

 

62

Deferred tax liability

 

 

 —

 

 

70

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

 —

 

 

45

Total liabilities

 

 

6,306

 

 

15,482

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Note 9)

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock - $0.01 par value, 15,000,000 shares authorized at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, 47 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, liquidation preference of $42 at December 31, 2019

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 150,000,000 shares authorized at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, 7,898,117 and 2,298,738 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively

 

 

79

 

 

23

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

74,065

 

 

53,796

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(60,939)

 

 

(47,696)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

13,205

 

 

6,123

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

19,511

 

$

21,605

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

39

PRECIPIO, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

For the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

(Dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

2019

    

2018

SALES:

 

 

  

 

 

  

Service revenue, net

 

$

4,051

 

$

3,335

Clinical research grants

 

 

 —

 

 

100

Other

 

 

44

 

 

13

Revenue, net of contractual allowances and adjustments

 

 

4,095

 

 

3,448

less allowance for doubtful accounts

 

 

(968)

 

 

(584)

Net sales

 

 

3,127

 

 

2,864

COST OF SALES:

 

 

  

 

 

  

Service revenue

 

 

2,908

 

 

2,549

Clinical research grants

 

 

 —

 

 

90

Total cost of sales

 

 

2,908

 

 

2,639

Gross profit

 

 

219

 

 

225

OPERATING EXPENSES:

 

 

  

 

 

  

Operating expenses

 

 

9,623

 

 

9,452

Impairment of intangible assets and goodwill

 

 

1,590

 

 

4,685

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES

 

 

11,213

 

 

14,137

OPERATING LOSS

 

 

(10,994)

 

 

(13,912)

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):

 

 

  

 

 

  

Interest expense, net

 

 

(473)

 

 

(269)

Warrant revaluation

 

 

416

 

 

1,918

Loss on modification of warrants

 

 

(1,128)

 

 

 —

Derivative revaluation

 

 

(415)

 

 

267

Gain on settlement of liability, net

 

 

1,437

 

 

263

(Loss) gain on extinguishment of debt

 

 

(20)

 

 

376

Loss on extinguishment of convertible notes

 

 

 —

 

 

(2,903)

Loss on litigation

 

 

(266)

 

 

 —

Loss on issuance of convertible notes

 

 

(1,870)

 

 

(1,328)

Loss on settlement of equity instruments

 

 

 —

 

 

(385)

Total other expenses

 

 

(2,319)

 

 

(2,061)

LOSS BEFORE INCOME TAXES

 

 

(13,313)

 

 

(15,973)

INCOME TAX BENEFIT

 

 

70

 

 

279

NET LOSS

 

 

(13,243)

 

 

(15,694)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deemed dividends related to beneficial conversion feature of preferred stock and fair value of consideration issued to induce conversion of preferred stock

 

 

 —

 

 

(4,222)

TOTAL DIVIDENDS

 

 

 —

 

 

(4,222)

NET LOSS AVAILABLE TO COMMON STOCKHOLDERS

 

$

(13,243)

 

$

(19,916)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BASIC AND DILUTED LOSS PER COMMON SHARE

 

$

(2.33)

 

$

(13.82)

BASIC AND DILUTED WEIGHTED-AVERAGE SHARES OF COMMON STOCK OUTSTANDING

 

 

5,695,159

 

 

1,441,113

 

See notes to consolidated financial statements.

40

PRECIPIO, INC. AND SUBSIDIARY

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

For the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred Stock

 

Common Stock

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding

 

Par

    

Outstanding

    

Par

 

Paid-in

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

    

Shares

    

Value

    

Shares

    

Value

    

Capital

    

Deficit

    

Total

Balance, January 1, 2018

 

4,935

 

$

 —

 

679,774

 

$

 7

 

$

44,560

 

$

(31,542)

 

$

13,025

Net loss

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(15,694)

 

 

(15,694)

Conversion of preferred stock into common stock

 

(4,888)

 

 

 —

 

431,022

 

 

 4

 

 

(4)

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Conversion of convertible notes into common stock

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

384,896

 

 

 4

 

 

2,352

 

 

 —

 

 

2,356

Issuance of common stock in connection with purchase agreements

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

428,050

 

 

 5

 

 

2,003

 

 

 —

 

 

2,008

Issuance of common stock in exchange for cancelation of other current liabilities

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

120,983

 

 

 1

 

 

1,896

 

 

 —

 

 

1,897

Issuance of common stock upon exercise of warrants

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

252,486

 

 

 2

 

 

1,269

 

 

 —

 

 

1,271

Issuance of common stock for consulting services

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

1,527

 

 

 —

 

 

39

 

 

 —

 

 

39

Warrant modification recorded as debt discount in conjunction with convertible note issuance

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

11

 

 

 —

 

 

11

Beneficial conversion feature on issuance of convertible notes

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

2,118

 

 

 —

 

 

2,118

Write-off beneficial conversion feature in conjunction with convertible note extinguishment

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(1,029)

 

 

 —

 

 

(1,029)

Write-off debt discounts (net of debt premiums) in conjunction with convertible note conversions

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(210)

 

 

 —

 

 

(210)

Write-off debt derivative liability in conjunction with convertible note conversions

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

301

 

 

 —

 

 

301

Liability recorded related to equity purchase agreement repricing

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(460)

 

 

(460)

Non-cash stock-based compensation

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

490

 

 

 —

 

 

490

Balance, December 31, 2018

 

47

 

$

 —

 

2,298,738

 

$

23

 

$

53,796

 

$

(47,696)

 

$

6,123

Net loss

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(13,243)

 

 

(13,243)

Conversion of convertible notes into common stock

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

2,511,173

 

 

25

 

 

7,528

 

 

 —

 

 

7,553

Issuance of common stock in connection with purchase agreements

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

2,778,077

 

 

28

 

 

6,600

 

 

 —

 

 

6,628

Proceeds upon issuance of common stock from exercise of warrants

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

310,200

 

 

 3

 

 

1,572

 

 

 —

 

 

1,575

Write-off warrant liability in conjunction with warrant exercises

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

2,364

 

 

 —

 

 

2,364

Beneficial conversion feature on issuance of convertible notes